Need some help...Please!

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by wisk, Aug 4, 2005.

  1. wisk

    wisk

    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    10
    I have a question that I really do not know the answer to.

    Next year, I plan to market and sell a roasted garlic honey spread at local farmers markets and through local sales. However, I do not want to have to refriderate it until it is opened like the stuff you would find at a gracery store.

    My spread will be mayo based.

    so my question... will I have to can the spread like I would can jam so it can stay at room temp until opened? and if so, how long would I have to keep it in the boiling water?

    wouldnt heating mayo brake it?
     
  2. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,296
    Likes Received:
    877
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Please check with, at least, your county extension office has they might have a deeper answer to this question that most of us here at CT could give you, and check with your local health department. You may be getting into a whole world that you would rather not. There are many hoops you have to jump through to be able to sell such products legally. And believe me you want to make sure you are on the up and up. There aren't a whole lot of nasties that can survive canning, but the ones that can, will kill. If you aren't licensed to sell such products you open yourself up to a world of trouble if you make someone sick or kill them with your product. Not only can you be held financial responsible, criminal charges could be filed. Yes, I know that other people do it, but they are foolish, if they aren't licensed.
     
  3. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,743
    Likes Received:
    346
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    You need to hire a consultant to

    1) Locate a production/packaging facility
    2) Create your ingredient labeling (called an ingredient deck)
    3) Help make sure you're in compliance with local/state/fed laws

    There's lots more of course, but those are the three main things.

    Depending on the scope of the business, a lot of work goes into these things. For example, yYou may need to recall the product in which case you need a way to pinpoint the actual batch that's being recalled. This requires proper labeling of cases and making sure all products on the box match up yadayada. Nabisco recently recalled millions of dollars of product because they were put in the wrong package. Nothing wrong with the product or the package, it's just that the package didn't match the contents. It was peanut butter Oreos in a regular Oreo package. Pretty bad if a kid with a peanut allergy manages to take a bite out of one. Not only is that against the law, it could kill someone.
     
  4. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

    Messages:
    7,375
    Likes Received:
    64
    Exp:
    Professional Caterer
    where are you located? I JUST dealt with this 5 minutes ago....a fresh salsa maker wanted to sell product at my farmer's market. The requirements for my market are that you have a certified kitchen, Hep A's and if sampling product do it in a safe manner...ie...no chips in a big bowl for everyone to touch. The contract requires product liability ins., there's no limit specification.

    Garlic honey spread....I'd talk to a university with food science dept or nutrition dept to see if they would help you out. There are places that make product to spec around here. Sounds interesting. Farmer's Markets are a different animal than most venues but your still selling to the public.
    Can't tell you how many I turn away every year that want to sell their baked goods made at home.....etc......
    6 this week, I don't remember writing this into my job discription......