Need non gelatine mousse

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by ozarkrose, Apr 8, 2005.

  1. ozarkrose

    ozarkrose

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    Has anyone used a tapioca starch to stabilize a mousse? I need something that is pipeable but will hold its shape.
     
  2. m brown

    m brown

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    i use chocolate or coco butter to stabelize a mousse, you can also use a combination of pate a bomb, meringue, whipped cream and fruit pruee.
    there are whipped cream stabilizers that can help.
    best!
     
  3. 100folds

    100folds

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    Why tapioca?
    Ive used Agar agar before for vegarians because gelatin is made from meat bones or rather the cartiledge.
    Anyways, agar agar comes in a powder and you use it like you would use gelatin. It is made from seaweed and was used in japanese cuisine for jellies and sauces. When using it be certain that your acid ratio is being taken into account because the acid will effect the stabilization. Just like gelatin, if acid is present you have to add more agar agar. Let your mixture bloom, heat slightly and add to your cream.
    With tapioca, I would be concerned about the texture. The balls seem to form no matter what. Maybe blitz ut before setting into mold but that might effect the hold of it. Your safest bet is the agar agar. You should be able to find it in any china town you visit. At least that is where mine came from.
    Good luck, if any questions let me know.

    100 folds
     
  4. ozarkrose

    ozarkrose

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    Thanks for the tip on agar agar, but as tapioca is readily available at the moment I'll try it first. I'll order the other and try it too; china town is 1,ooo + miles either direction!
     
  5. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Where do you live and what kind of mousse are you making? You might be surprised at what you can find at your local Asian grocer. They're everywhere these days.

    In addition to agar-agar, you can use cocoa butter, a meringue, or a cream stabilizer made by Oetker available at European grocers.
     
  6. ozarkrose

    ozarkrose

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    I live in Fayetteville Arkansas, and although I imagine there is an Asian store around, I cannot remember seeing one (except for the one in Springdale with the bars on the windows because of the scary neighborhood, and you're asking "why were you in that scary of a neighborhood?" HA!).
    I made a savory smoked salmon mousse (no egg) filling for a canape which had a shaved cucumber for the edging. I didn't want the rubbery texture of gelatine so they could bite through the whole piece, and I also thought, if the cucumber leaked at all, a starch might help absorb that. I worked great, but I also plan to try the agar too as the flavor might go well.
     
  7. cape chef

    cape chef

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    No, but a Swiss meringue might do the trick.
     
  8. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Oh you're making canapes! How many canape butters can you make with the leftovers in your fridge? :D LOL!

    Just use cream cheese if it's going to be outdoors and too hot.

    I thought because this was a pastry forum that this was a sweet thing.
     
  9. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Trying to throw off the pastry chefs, eh?

    I guess a white chocolate stabilizer is outta the question, then.
     
  10. ozarkrose

    ozarkrose

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    Weellll, I thought Pastry Chefs would know more specifically what I wanted as the texture needed to be exactly what I wanted (know what I mean?). That is what I LOVE about baking. It is the perfect blend of art and science. I am fooling around with less fat and texture seems to come more into focus. Not to say I'm a minimalist (HA, how novelle!)
    I think the play on textures is something that is inherient in pastry. Isn't it kind of funny that we are seeing "famous" (yes, in quotes) chefs now using this method for the main courses?