Need knives for home use

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by Qwertyuiop, Sep 23, 2018.

  1. Qwertyuiop

    Qwertyuiop

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    I think you guys aren't gonna like my asnwer but I think I'm just gonna do the victorinox knives.

    I rather use the money toward equipments since I'm moving out on my own next year springtime. I don't really have anything and I rather build a nice amount of equipments to cook different food at home and cookbooks as well
     
    Jason Drückenmiller likes this.
  2. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    I find that choice quite acceptable considering your needs and future plans. Keep it sharp and cook to your heart’s delight. You can always buy a different knife later.
     
    Jason Drückenmiller likes this.
  3. Jason Drückenmiller

    Jason Drückenmiller

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    Agreed with @brianshaw, this is kind of where we were leading you is to choose the equipment to sharpen the knives and go for cheaper knives to practice and really discover what you want to move with next.....nothing wrong with Victorinox at all....good knives, especially at the "bang for your buck" category. They sharpen easily and keep a decent edge.....Now go get some stones and a sink bridge, and some new cooking equipment :)
     
  4. Qwertyuiop

    Qwertyuiop

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    thanks guys

    Definitely going to be a spending budget on kitchen alone lol... I only got one of those cooking pots/pans set from my mom that she bought some years ago that she never use.. some brand I never heard of called heritage, hopefully they hold up well enough

    pretty much need everything else but I'm not sure what are the best brand for certain items for an advanced home cook kitchen

    same goes for cookbooks ... too many books to know which ones are good
     
  5. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    You are starting the way many of us started. Focus on survival cooking first - the basics - and you’ll soon figure out what gear you need to buy or replace. Enjoy the process and pay attention to your evolution!
     
    millionsknives likes this.
  6. Qwertyuiop

    Qwertyuiop

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    i have easily enough money to trick out my kitchen but I'm not the type the buy the most expensive items if it does the same job from a cheaper version item... I don't buy the cheapest or most expensive unless it absolutely necessary and no comparsion then I will buy the expensive... I'm geared toward best valued items
     
  7. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    I’m likeminded for most things! You’ll do well with that kind of attitude!!
     
  8. Qwertyuiop

    Qwertyuiop

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    thanks :)

    i just hope i don't get ripped off on items that I could have gotten something cheaper or something that got better performance lol

    you guys got any recommendation on cookbooks?
     
  9. rick alan

    rick alan

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    We have a forum for cook books.
     
  10. Qwertyuiop

    Qwertyuiop

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    Will post a thread there soon
     
  11. Qwertyuiop

    Qwertyuiop

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    should I buy the victorinox knife now at amazon canada it on sale for $42 from regular price of $70

    or wait until black friday? because I forgot about black friday and thought maybe a canadian online knives store do black friday as well and get a deal on a knife.... is it possible?
     
  12. Knifeman

    Knifeman

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    Depends upon your budget? I have an assortment of knives from a range of brands. Mercer isn't bad for a more economical brand. I would use them over Victorinox. MAC is awesome, but more spendy. Zelite is another brand I am liking. I like the Japanese style knives and hybrids more than the more European brands. Knives are very user specific. I even have a Cutco knife I use at times, simply because I like it for a specific cutting task. Nobody can criticise a person's choice of knives if that's what that person likes. I never buy sets cause I find that I prefer different brands for specific knives. I have for example a MAC MTH-80 Chef Knife, a Zelite Infinity Chef Knife, a Zwilling paring knife, a Cutco hardy slicer, a Shun santoku knife. All of these see rotation depending upon what I am doing. The MAC probably sees the most regular use, then the Zelite and Shun.
     
  13. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Well I hope you got your Vic, it is arguably the best-in-class out there. All you need for stones is a 1K to begin with, and a King 300 when it comes to doing some thinning.
     
  14. Ruppert Green

    Ruppert Green

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    In my opinion, first of all, you need to think about ergonomics.
    Ergonomics is all about comfort. Special features of a knife with proper ergonomics:

    1) The handle is comfortable in the hand and pleasant to the touch. Do not hesitate to look through the entire range of the store. "Your" knife will be a continuation of the hand, will merge into one;
    2) The knife is properly balanced. Ideally, the center of gravity is at the junction of the handle and the blade. A small margin in the direction of the blade is possible, but not vice versa;
    3) butt edges smoothed to avoid rubbing corns.

    I think this article can be useful: https://www.ergochef.com/ErgoEngineering.php
     
  15. galley swiller

    galley swiller

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    re: Post #34:

    That "article" is a pretty vivid example of self-serving justification for selling the product.

    I'm not too much of a fan of so-called "ergo" handles. I feel that a user needs to work at using a pinch grip (thumb and forefinger on the faces of the blade forward of any bolster and the other 3 fingers loosely wrapped around the handle) as the primary grip used when cutting. You get significantly more control, there's less stress put on the fingers and it's a grip which is much less stressful to hold in long prep sessions.

    Depending on the size and shape of the bolster area, ergo handles can be much harder to hold in a pinch grip. For any chef's knife, give me a handle which is a straight in-line-continuation-with-the-spine and I can get an easy and secure pinch grip almost every time.

    I also took a look at that line of knives being offered. "X50CrMoV15" steel? That's just plain old 4116 steel from Thuyssen-Krupp. Fairly pedestrian. And an 18 degree edge? Ugh! Kullenschiff "hollow-grind"? What that really means is that the blade needs to be thickened so that there's enough metal to allow for the grinding of the kullens. And that means wedging. Heat treated to hRc 56 to 58? That's a yawner. Most blades with good Japanese steel are heat treated to at LEAST hRc 58 and usually to hRc 60 or better.

    Balance? A pinch grip solves that problem immediately.

    As for sharp edges of the spine or the heel of the blade, it's pretty standard practice to take the "edge" off by a light sanding of the edge. Using a manicurist's emery file board (available in dollar stores) can do that in about a minute or 2 (of course, there's the amount of time spent in the store looking through the cosmetics section just to find the @#%& sticks). Otherwise, that's a non-issue.

    GS
     
  16. rick alan

    rick alan

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    I'll second GS's assessment of the article. So-called ergo handles tend to favor hammers more than kitchen knives, a product designed solely to create a market out of the unwary

    Where a knife balances is not terribly important, unless it serves an auxiliary function, like outdoor knives being handle-heavy to reduce the tendency of slipping out of hand while moving around and about. I personally like the feel of a handle-heavy knife but only for the relatively light weight slicer.

    A thin light knife with a lot of flat to the edge, a thin edge at that, and exceptional steel that can take a very sharp edge and hold it, this is what performance knives are really about. Virtually any coffin-shaped handle works really well with them, except Vic handles which are poorly done, don't understand why they fell so short there.
     
  17. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    Another agreement. Everything in that piece of ad copy mislabeled an "article" is mediocre, dubious, or deceptive.
     
  18. snapshot2020

    snapshot2020

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    I would advise getting a cheap 8 inch Chef knife to use to learn to sharpen it.
     
  19. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    Actually I don't agree with this. Cheap knives are very difficult to sharpen, as a rule, so you end up learning a lot of bad habits.
     
  20. snapshot2020

    snapshot2020

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    You will have to explain to me why you think the cheap knives are hard to sharpen, is it because they have hard stainless steel used in their blades? if one has the correct stones to use hard steel is no more a problem then softer steel.
    And how would one get any bad habits sharping these cheaper type knives?