Need an all purpose knife

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by beardedcrow, Oct 1, 2012.

  1. beardedcrow

    beardedcrow

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    Hello everyone,

    I am a sushi chef, and have a Shun yanagi 270mm vg007?

    Anyways my knife is decent at cutting fish, but not for maki or other foods as it's too sharp and chips

    I was looking at kiritsuke but not sure this is for me.

    Can anyone help me out?

    Budget is roughly $300
     
  2. beardedcrow

    beardedcrow

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    BTW I'm used to single bevel knives.

    I've been using water stones for a few years, but no expert.
     
  3. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    When you say single bevel, is that chisel point or vee point?
     
  4. beardedcrow

    beardedcrow

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    Chisel or wedge.

    Basically sushi knives.

    BTW, Shun sells these knives with 3 bevels, why I'm not sure, took months to fix.
     
  5. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Your Shun is VG-10, VG-10 is somewhat more chip prone than other alloys, and Shun isn't the least chippy of san-mai VG-10s, cutting maki and temaki is fairly light duty and shouldn't result in chipping.  Shouldn't shmouldn't.  It does, and here we are.

    The good news is that it's not hard to move to something better than Shun.  LOTS of better knives than Shun.  LOTS.  "LOTS" as in any good knife.

    There's no theoretical reason a kiritsuke -- which combines some of the advantages of usuba, yanagi, and gyuto -- won't work for you.  But that doesn't mean it will.   You might be better off with a more extensive kit.  Most of the sushi men I know use the three knife combo of yanagiba, deba and usuba -- each as appropriate; some use a suji for slicing during the day and reserve their yanagibas for the high-rolling dinner crowd.  

    Unfortunately I don't have enough experience with traditional Japanese edges to give you much guidance.  Get in touch with Jon Broida (who owns Japanese Knife Imports) either by PM or phone.  He can help you, no doubt.  

    Now that you know how little I know, take it FWIW that I'd probably go carbon over stainless for your purposes anyway.  But talk to Jon. 

    BDL 
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2012
  6. beardedcrow

    beardedcrow

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    Thanks for the informative reply!

    I will research gyotos when I can.

    Yes my shun was a gift and I personally wouldn't spend this much on a shun.
     
  7. jbroida

    jbroida

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    just fyi, i'm in japan until october 20th, so while i am responding as best i can, there can sometimes be delays.
     
  8. beardedcrow

    beardedcrow

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    So at work my headchef brought a slicer to show me, I must say I think this isthe knife suited for me.

    Will be reading on slicers for now. His was 270mm
     
  9. 808jono202

    808jono202

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    I was going to say for a true all purpose, I LOVE a cleaver, or Japanese vegetable knife(Nakiri). Great for almost everything i can think of, with the exception of hacking at heavy bones. . . but I don't think that is something you would have to deal with regularly.

    Single edged blade(iirc), great for using the tip for fine work, middle for typical work/prep, the length is great for slicing, and being wide and flat, is great to use as a spatula to help cary things to the bowl/wok/where ever. . .

     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2012
  10. beardedcrow

    beardedcrow

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    Beautiful cleaver though!

    Ordered a 270mm slicer.
     
  11. rdm magic

    rdm magic

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    Which slicer?
     
  12. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Good luck with your new suji.  I hope it not only does what you want, but does all those things beautifully. 

    Paranthetically, I must say that a nakiri is one of the worst choices for an all-rounder in a sushi-ya which I could imagine.  But those are my imaginings.  What's your reasoning Jon?  Do you use anything as short as a nakiri for a lot of slicing and other fish prep?

    FWIW and without getting into ambiguous single and double bevel/edge terminology:  MOST nakiri are sharpened on both sides in the typical "V" and not sharpened almost entirely on one side in Japanese, "chisel" or "hamaguri" fashion. 

    BDL
     
  13. beardedcrow

    beardedcrow

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    Misono Swedish slicer 270mm.

    I know it'll be double bevel, but I will grind other side to make it single bevel.
     
  14. rdm magic

    rdm magic

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    I may be wrong, but isn't there more to a single bevel than just grinding away the other side? Something about it being more like \( than \| I believe 
     
  15. scubadoo97

    scubadoo97

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    Yes in traditional Japanese single beveled like a yanagiba it has a concave back
     
  16. beardedcrow

    beardedcrow

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    Honestly I have no issues with my food sticking to the backside of my gyuto eith one bevel flattened.
     
  17. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    So, if one flattens a V, does that mean you grind half of the knife away to create the chisel edge \|/ ?
     
  18. beardedcrow

    beardedcrow

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    Probably a MM. It will take months but I've done a few that way.

    I was taught by some old Japanese guys long ago.
     
  19. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    The easiest way to turn a "V" edge into a chisel is to sharpen primarily on one side, doing just enough work on the other side to chase the burr.  It's a fairly gradual process and you don't waste a lot of metal that way. 

    In my opinion you don't get enough benefit in terms of absolute sharpness and lose too much durability when you sharpen a relatively thin knife -- like most sujis, and Masamoto Sweden in particular -- with too much asymmetry.  But to each his own. 

    BDL
     
  20. beardedcrow

    beardedcrow

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    I'm not sure if it's just me, I prefer single bevels as I used a yanagi for 6-7 years.

    I usually use a 10,000 grit stone to remove other bevel which takes a very long time but it was how I was taught.
    I might be doing the wrong thing to these knives but they certainly work for me.

    I have a gyuto for when I need it, I just need a knife similar to a thin yanagi but a little more durable.
    My headchef has the misono Swedish slicer with the other bevel removed and it's a wonderful knife!

    Cuts fish like a yanagi but can also cut through bone!