Neckerchief

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by magic_chef, Jul 15, 2002.

  1. magic_chef

    magic_chef

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    Hi,

    I am not a chef yet, but I am going the help in a kitchen from next week onwards, to see if this is what I want. I have to bring a uniform, neckerchief and a good pair of shoes (I guess I wear clogs like everybody else in this forum).

    My question, is there anybody who can tell me how to tie the neckerchief the way all Chefs do. I would like to impress my new colleages. Please help !
     
  2. shawtycat

    shawtycat

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    Hi,

    Just wanted you to know that we aren't ignoring you. Ive personally never tied a neckerchief. Im sure someone here knows but just hasn't visited the board yet. :) Although Im not sure how they will be able to accurately describe it with words only. If I find a diagram Ill post a link.

    Good Luck

    Jodi
     
  3. shawtycat

    shawtycat

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    Ok...here is the low down on the Culinary Ties....ahem

    At the Culinary Institute, chef-instructors wear white double-breasted jackets with sleeves neatly turned back at the cuff. Red and blue braid stripes at the collar and above the left pocket distinguish instructors from students, who otherwise wear virtually the same uniform. A neckerchief tied cravat-style effects much the kind of finis hing touch that a tie worn with a business suit achieves. Today, it is not so essential as when chefs toiled over open fires in badly ventilated kitchens; then the scarf served to catch and absorb facial perspiration. Different colors of neckerchiefs mean different things at the Institute. Chef-instructors sport a white one;' students generally wear yellow neckerchiefs, with the exception of members of the Service Club who wear distinctive blue ones.


    Here is an example of a Cravat-style Tie:

    [​IMG]

    I have unfortunately not found a diagram that shows HOW to tie this kind of tie.

    Jodi
     
  4. magic_chef

    magic_chef

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    Jodi,

    Thanks for your help, but to be honest with you I am still not sure where to put the ends, to make it look neat. Last night I tried to look at a Chef but it was very difficult to see. Well I guess I have to keep on trying.
     
  5. suzanne

    suzanne

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    Dear Magic Chef,

    Don't worry so much about how you tie the kerchief ;) -- as long as you are clean and neat, you'll be fine.

    If you REALLY want to impress them, do it with your work and your attitude. Listen carefully to what they tell you; ask them to explain anything you don't understand, so that you can do it right; work clean, and clean up after each task; if you borrow something (like a knife, for example) from someone, give it back clean; whatever they give you to do, do it as well as you can, even if it's something really booooooooooooring.

    It's really good that you have the chance to do this; use it as the learning experience it's meant to be.
     
  6. cookie3

    cookie3

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    A Neckerchief

    It also serves the purpose of stoping drafts from flowing inside the back of your jacket, when entering a walkin after leaving the line, I know that this reply is about 6 months late, but I usually teach every new chef that starts with me to tie one. Basically it is tied the same as a half windsor knot.
    At the following URL you will find how to tie it, the only difference is that the two ends are then tucked under and up behind the knot and then finally pushed into the top front of the main knot
    Or you can just leave the ends tucked into the Chef Jacket.

    http://www.bensilver.com/knots/halfwin.html

    cookie
     
  7. leo r.

    leo r.

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    magic_chef,the information given by cookie 3 is spot on.I am a chef and i can assure you that you are not the first person to have this problem.One unfortunate student i saw last year thought that they are worn similar to the ones in cowboy films! Some male students don`t know how to tie their aprons,then they walk into the kitchen with a large bow at the back:eek:
    As Suzanne pointed out,the chef lecturers/future employers will be more impressed by your general appearance.Being a chef involves much,much more than knowing how to tie a neckerchief.

    Good luck and i hope you achieve your objective,Leo R.:chef:

    Remember,cooking is where art & science meet.
     
  8. moxiefan

    moxiefan

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    Pardon my ignorance, but how do you tie an apron?

    -P
     
  9. suzanne

    suzanne

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    Apron-tying 101: First find your waist, if you can (it's getting harder and harder for some of us) ;) . Position the apron so that the big (white, if it's new and clean) solid part is in front of you, and the top (where the strings are) is somewhere a little above your waist, if it exists. This is done much more easily with a bib apron -- just hang that one off your neck, with the solid part in front of you, not flying behind like Superman.

    The above is meant as a joke. Now for the serious instructions:

    After you've positioned your apron a little above your waist, bring the strings around your back, cross them and bring them back to your front. Tie them IN FRONT of you. There will be only a little to tie, not enough for a great big bow. Fold the top down over the tied strings. This gives a very neat appearance. (It also provides a place to hang your side towel so that it is always handy.)

    Personally, I always love the waiters' aprons with pockets on them; I can keep extra folded-up side towels in the pockets for times when somebody else picks up my towel -- that is, when it disappears and I have to pull a blazing hot saute pan out of the oven!
     
  10. katbalou

    katbalou

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    dear suzanne,
    ;) i totally agree with the first instuctions! :) :) :)
    kat
     
  11. moxiefan

    moxiefan

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    Well, ask a silly question...

    I understand. I thought that tying neatly in front might be what we were talking about, but I wasn't sure. Suzanne, little do you know, but your first directions were not far off... every week when we have linens delivered there'll be three or four aprons with really long ties in the stack, and I have to try and sneak them out of the pile before the sous nabs 'em (every one else can properly tie all the aprons in the stack, long ties or no). He's pretty wiley and I often end up having to tie behind me (sigh). Darn these big bones!:)

    -P
     
  12. suzanne

    suzanne

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    Moxie -- I wish I could blame it on bones! ;) But here's a trick: if you can find some string, tie that onto the short apron-ties to make them long enough. Or, since string tends to be in short supply (pun intended), take a long length of plastic wrap, scrunch it up on the diagonal, and use that as an apron tie. Also works as a belt when you have to take the wrong size pants from the clean laundry pile!
     
  13. leo r.

    leo r.

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    Moxiefan,as Suzanne pointed out you tie an apron at the front like a martial arts belt.Besides this looking more professional,it is also done for safety reasons.You would be suprised how many accidents are caused by loops on aprons being caught on handles,etc.I remember one over enthusiatic student who had this actually happen to him despite repeated advice.
    This was in a college kitchen,not in an actual working establishment.Leo R.:chef:
     
  14. kimmie

    kimmie

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    Suzanne,

    I also love the first set of instuctions! :chef:
     
  15. cookinernie

    cookinernie

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    I have seen lopts of chefs wearing hats of all different kinds but which one is the best? the tall white ones the flat ones or what??:chef:
     
  16. firepatrolchef

    firepatrolchef

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    The picture I saw looked more like the knot a USN Sailor uses on their neckerchiefs....
    with the *left* side (I think) a bit longer than the right....go left over right and thruough....then right over and through. If youve done this right...you have even ends and a nice neatflat fronted square knot.
    As for hats...Ive been in a couple of well placed NYC restaurant kitchens...and some of the people *didnt* wear hats.