NE1 have a GREAT turtle recipe?

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by buckeye_hunter, Sep 10, 2010.

  1. buckeye_hunter

    buckeye_hunter

    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    13
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    I just found a 5 lb package of turtle meat languishing in the freezer...I have found the usual recipes for soup and stew.  Does NE1 have a more interesting recipe?

    Thanks in advance,
     
  2. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

    Messages:
    6,367
    Likes Received:
    129
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    What about deep fried? You up for that?
     
  3. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

    Messages:
    6,367
    Likes Received:
    129
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    Meanwhile:

    Snapper With Madeira

    1 1/4 pounds boneless turtle meat, cut in paper-thin slices

    Flour

    3 tbls butter

    Salt & Pepper to taste

    3/4 cup Madeira, divided

    1/2 cup heavy cream

    3 drops hot sauce

    Chopped parsley for garnish

    Paprika for garnish

    Heat the butter in a heavy skillet. Dredge meat in flour and brown lightly. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/2 cup of the Madeira, cover, and simmer until meat is tender, about an hour, adding a little water if needed.

    Just before serving add the rest of the wine and the cream. Heat to boiling point, but don't let it boil.

    Serve on buttered toast points, topped with some shopped parsley and a sprinkle of paprika.

    Or, how about:

    Toast Turtle

    One 10-12 lb turtle, cleaned and cut into pieces

    6 stalks celery, cut into small lengths

    1/2 large onion, cut up

    1 tsp sage

    1 tsp black pepper

    2 tbls salt

    1 tbls dry thyme

    12 oz (1 1/2 sticks) butter or margarine

    Put turtle pieces in a pot, cover with water, bring to boil. Let boil 30 minutes.

    Remove meat from water and put into a greased roasting pan. Remove as much of the celery and onions as possible and lay on top of the meat. Top veggies with the butter.

    Roast in a 300F oven for one hour, basing at least three times during the cooking time.
     
  4. buckeye_hunter

    buckeye_hunter

    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    13
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    Thanks,

    I just finished putting some browned turtle in the oven to braise in red wine for an hour or so.  I wish I had seen your post before I started, maybe I could have tried something more ambitious.  I have more meat in the fridge for another recipe tomorrow.

    Tonight I am going to try turtle carnitas with tomatilla & avacado salsa.  I made the salsa earlier in the week for leftover pulled pork.

    If there is any interest, I uploaded a few pics on my profile page.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2010
  5. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

    Messages:
    6,367
    Likes Received:
    129
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    As should be obvious, that second recipe is for roast turtle, not toast turtle.

    Sorry. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/redface.gif
     
  6. jomead

    jomead

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    This is new to me so what sort of consistency does turlte meat have?

    Is it on the tough side and what colour is it? I shall have a lok in the speciality shops here

    but do has anyone got an idea wher to look...Chinese supermarket perhaps?
     
  7. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

    Messages:
    6,367
    Likes Received:
    129
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    Can't tell you where to look as all the turtle I've eaten has been wild trapped. My trapper friend sold more to restaurants than to markets.

    Turtle meat varies, depending on what part of the critter it comes from. It's commonly said that there are seven different meats on a turtle, but that's an overstatement, IMO. Most of the meat is found in the neck, legs, and tail. Plus, if you're willing to work for them, the tenderloins---as in all animals---are the best part.

    Americans tend to prefer snapping turtle meat, whereas Asians gravitate more towards the soft shell varieties. Personally, I've never noticed much difference between the two if they've been prepared properly, and the preferences are likely more habit than anything else.

    I dislike making comparisons between proteins (they all taste like chicken, right?). But if pressed to the wall, I'd say turtle most resembles veal, both visually and in texture. But the flavor is totally different.