Nature's different colored eggs

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whoooo hoooo....finally a picture!!!!

These are cuyuga duck eggs from Sunflower Farms, I've had green, blue, pink eggs from various chickens but these are the first grey & black eggs....way cool!  

If you've got fun eggs show us.
 

phatch

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My brother-in-law supplies me with blue, green pink and tan chicken eggs. No duck eggs though, nor pix.
 
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Shroomgirl, I have no idea why, but in my country duckeggs are still a little suspected of being carriers of deseases like... botulism. I don't think I'm aware of a single source where we could buy these eggs. However, I frequently watch cooking programs on the English BBC where I have watched more than one chef use duckeggs. They seem to be more creamy than chicken eggs?

Is there any warning about health-issues in the US concerning duckeggs?
 
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nope, none that I know of...

duck whites have more viscosity so it'll hold a heavier mix if you are making a meringue.  Eggs like meat rely on what was eaten ....that's why farm eggs differ from insipid pale yolked commercial eggs.
 
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Why are the eggs different colors? A guest gave me some from his farm last year. They were blue, green & brown. I believe he told me that the green ones have more cholesterol. he's an old Italian w/ a VERY thick accent so I didn't push for anymore details. Thanx for reminding me of that question. And the eggs the best I ever had!
 
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Those stone coloured ones look amazing.

I was under the impression that different coloured eggs are because of a difference in diet/feedstuffs, rather than the cholesterol level (how could he tell, I wonder?/img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif)
 
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(how could he tell, I wonder?/img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif)


 My thoughts exactly!

I was thinking that a difference in diet would make different colors. But wouldn't it stand to reason that the eggs should all be the same color unless he separated them and gave different types of feed? Maybe some chickens are picky eaters that only eat certain parts of the feed/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif
 
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I always thought that brown eggs came from brown chickens and white eggs came from white chickens.  Could be wrong.

What makes a deep rich red yolk?  Sometimes I watch Nigella but only because I love the color of her egg yolks!
 
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As Mary notes, shell color is determined primarily by the breed. However, what the birds eat can effect the color of the insides, particularly the yolks. That's why range-fed chickens have yolks with a deeper, more orange color, for instance.
 
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I always thought that brown eggs came from brown chickens and white eggs came from white chickens.  Could be wrong.

What makes a deep rich red yolk?  Sometimes I watch Nigella but only because I love the color of her egg yolks!
KK

Rich yolk colcour?  I always have bright reddy-orange yolks, because I always buy free range, organic eggs!
 
 
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This is from my friend Samanatha aka Sam's Sunflower Savannah blog....

The Cayuga ducks have been mating like crazy and laying a few eggs. I think mostly they are hiding them. Either that or our Great Pyrenees, Rosa is getting them. Here is a pic of 2 white eggs and a BLACK one that we got last week. The Cayugas lay a variety of egg colors. They range from a pale green to black and also the basic white which of course goes with everything. The funny thing is, some ducks start out the season laying green or black eggs and as the season wears on, the eggs might slowly begin to turn another color. Say the black eggs will turn green and then later white the longer they lay or the green eggs will over time be laid as white ones. Then again some of the hens will start out laying a green or black egg and they will continue to lay a green or black egg all season. That's Margarita my inquisitive kitty's face you see there in the edge of the photo.The Cayuga ducks have been mating like crazy and laying a few eggs. I think mostly they are hiding them. Either that or our Great Pyrenees, Rosa is getting them. Here is a pic of 2 white eggs and a BLACK one that we got last week. The Cayugas lay a variety of egg colors. They range from a pale green to black and also the basic white which of course goes with everything. The funny thing is, some ducks start out the season laying green or black eggs and as the season wears on, the eggs might slowly begin to turn another color. Say the black eggs will turn green and then later white the longer they lay or the green eggs will over time be laid as white ones. Then again some of the hens will start out laying a green or black egg and they will continue to lay a green or black egg all season. That's Margarita my inquisitive kitty's face you see there in the edge of the photo.
 
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The breed of chickens that lays the multi colored eggs are called araucana chickens. My family had about 15 or 20 of them a few years back mixed with some brown egg layers and some white egg layers. From what I remember all the eggs tasted the same (as they should) even the shell structure was near identical. I would love to try some ducks eggs and have been looking for an ostrich egg to try as well.
 
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As Mary notes, shell color is determined primarily by the breed. However, what the birds eat can effect the color of the insides, particularly the yolks. That's why range-fed chickens have yolks with a deeper, more orange color, for instance.
All of my birds were free range,they had 3 acres to roam around on. The whites firm and the yolks that vibrant orange/yellow. No comparison to the pale yellow yolks of a store bought egg from a factory chicken. In addition to their regular rations, The birds ate grass, seed, flowers, anything that I planted, lots of fruit, just about any veggie or food scrap went out the back door on the lawn, and would be gone within minutes. They also ate LOTS of grass hoppers in the summer, and on occasion would kill and eat mice or voles, but I think they did this more for sport than a meal.
 
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for those that don't know any better.....fresh eggs don't peel easily.

poulet or young chicken eggs are tiny and fun.

guinea hen eggs have tough shells and are heavy in yolk to white %

Farm eggs typically have harder shells than industrial eggs.
 
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all i really know about chickens is how to bone em and cook em, but my time at the ranch with 18 hens and chickens...minus 1....draft horse stepped on one's head the other night when the chicken was trying to stay warm during a snowstorm, has taught me a few things...1) chickens are funny creatures 2) they are definitely not picky eaters...we give them all the scraps from meals and prep with the exception of onions, meat and egg products(shells etc.) that would be a bit cannibalistic...they love steel cut oats!...the color comes from the species(breed),not specifically the diet, and the eggs, at least these here, come out soft, then harden as they are exposed to the air...i don't eat eggs per se, but cook alot of them for the guests, and they absolutely adore them...bright orange and truly farm fresh.....

joey
 
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