Natural?

3,073
965
Joined Jul 13, 2012
I remember when you wanted a "big" chicken you bought a capon. I would go to this live market in SOHO, NYC and pick one out then come back an hour later and it would be ready. You had to get them a couple of days ahead so they would go into and out of rigor before cooking.
 
1,821
532
Joined Aug 15, 2003
So, while the use of "growth hormones" is expressly prohibited under US law, it appears the poultry industry has devised a very clever way around this prohibition by developing and using an antibiotic that increases and accelerates growth as a "side effect." (see the study linked below that examines 7 million chickens produced by Purdue, the 4th largest chicken producer in the US).

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1804117/

So, based upon the available information, it would appear that the growth enhancing drugs are, in fact, used in commercial chicken production in the US.

On that basis, it would appear that Someday is partially correct in his statement that the use of growth hormones in the US poultry production are prohibited. But, it also appears that L'ouvo vullcanico is also generally correct insofar that growth enhancing drugs are used in US poultry production.

Cheers! :)

Discovering that healthy chickens (i.e. ones free of disease and infections) grown faster and bigger is hardly a revelation, and is not the same thing as pumping chickens full of "growth hormone."

I understand what comparisons you're trying to make but I think it's a bit of a stretch to claim that they are the same thing. The anti-biotics weren't added to the feed with the express purpose to make the chickens grow faster, they just discovered that less competing organisms in microbiome of the animals promoted nutrient retention and therefore growth. Less competing microbes = more nutrients for the body = faster growth.

We could have a larger discussion about the use of using blanket antibiotics in chicken feed and the effect on the human population at large, as well as the increasingly drug resistant stains of bacteria that are arising out of the unmitigated us of antibiotics in feedlots, but that seems beyond the scope of this discussion.
 
297
88
Joined Aug 7, 2013
Discovering that healthy chickens (i.e. ones free of disease and infections) grown faster and bigger is hardly a revelation, and is not the same thing as pumping chickens full of "growth hormone."

I understand what comparisons you're trying to make but I think it's a bit of a stretch to claim that they are the same thing. The anti-biotics weren't added to the feed with the express purpose to make the chickens grow faster, they just discovered that less competing organisms in microbiome of the animals promoted nutrient retention and therefore growth. Less competing microbes = more nutrients for the body = faster growth.

We could have a larger discussion about the use of using blanket antibiotics in chicken feed and the effect on the human population at large, as well as the increasingly drug resistant stains of bacteria that are arising out of the unmitigated us of antibiotics in feedlots, but that seems beyond the scope of this discussion.
I believe you have brought it into the scope.
 
1,152
705
Joined Mar 1, 2017
Discovering that healthy chickens (i.e. ones free of disease and infections) grown faster and bigger is hardly a revelation, and is not the same thing as pumping chickens full of "growth hormone."
I never said these two growth hormones and antibiotics were the same. What I said was that the use of growth enhancing drugs are used in poultry production in the US.
I understand what comparisons you're trying to make but I think it's a bit of a stretch to claim that they are the same thing. The anti-biotics weren't added to the feed with the express purpose to make the chickens grow faster, they just discovered that less competing organisms in microbiome of the animals promoted nutrient retention and therefore growth. Less competing microbes = more nutrients for the body = faster growth.
Again, I never said they were the same thing. But, you are correct in how the antibiotics promote growth.

However, the declared purpose of adding antibiotics to poultry was not to accelerate growth. That would be a violation of FDA Regulation. So, the poultry industry gets around it by stating that: a) antibiotics are not hormones and therefore, not prohibited by FDA regulation; and b) any effect on growth is simply a natural and "beneficial" side effect of the antibiotic.

We could have a larger discussion about the use of using blanket antibiotics in chicken feed and the effect on the human population at large, as well as the increasingly drug resistant stains of bacteria that are arising out of the unmitigated us of antibiotics in feedlots, but that seems beyond the scope of this discussion.
We could have that discussion. But, I think you would find that we are of one mind on this issue.

Cheers. :)
 
Top Bottom