National Hot Dog Day

89
10
Joined Aug 4, 2009
I would bbq, but it's raining /img/vbsmilies/smilies/mad.gif

I love a traditional dog with ketchup, mustard, sauerkraut and relish, plus maybe some vidalia onions if I'm in the mood.
 
3,208
159
Joined Aug 25, 2009
Chef BDL,

I like my buns toasted then the hot dogs topped with onions and mustard. (fried onions or not) , with a cold glass of  Sleeman or Heineken.
 

nicko

Founder of Cheftalk.com
Staff member
4,184
210
Joined Oct 5, 2001
I would bbq, but it's raining /img/vbsmilies/smilies/mad.gif

I love a traditional dog with ketchup, mustard, sauerkraut and relish, plus maybe some vidalia onions if I'm in the mood.
No dis-respect, but in Chicago you better not put ketchup on your hot dog. Celery salt, bright green relish, mustard, tomatoes and onion.
 
523
18
Joined Mar 9, 2010
Hot dogs grilled only with Mustard ,Relish and fresh from the garden chopped red onion....I don't eat processed food but I do have a hanker for a dog once in awhile......that's the way I used to eat em before I had all kinda restrictions in my diet.

Cheers to all the dog lovers out there....I'll just have a cold Coors and dream of hot dog days gone past!
 
8,550
207
Joined Feb 13, 2008
No dis-respect, but in Chicago you better not put ketchup on your hot dog. Celery salt, bright green relish, mustard, tomatoes and onion.
Oooh.  Oooh.  And sport peppers and dill pickle spears.  Leave us not forget the sport peppers and dill pepper spears.

BDL
 
Last edited:

nicko

Founder of Cheftalk.com
Staff member
4,184
210
Joined Oct 5, 2001
Very funny BDL. No peppers. Definitely the dill spears.
 
1,691
38
Joined Dec 23, 2000
"And sport peppers and dill pepper spears."

Ummm. no, BDL  The hot sport peppers are good, but it's dill pickle spears.  I believe the bright green relish and the celery salt have already been covered.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif  Some diced tomato is OK, too.

And, if you even mention ketchup, you will be thrown out any respectable hot dog joint in Chicago. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/bounce.gif   We are pretty intolerant about our dogs here in Chicago.

Mike

Actually, if nobody is watching me, I might go for a little kraut, too.
 
4,263
672
Joined Nov 5, 2007
The late Mike Ryoko, ascerbic curmudgeon who wrote a column for one of the two major papers, I forgot which, once mentioned putting catsup on a Chicago dog.  It took a while for THAT to die down!

I love a good Chicago dog, among many other styles.  Why does the relish have to be that bright, unnatural neon green?

mjb.
 
1,691
38
Joined Dec 23, 2000
No question at all about the hot sport peppers, BDL; one of the essential ingredients.

As I understand it, the flourescent-green pickle relish is "fermented"...  I'm not really sure what that means. It's not easy to find, even in local stores.

Of course, the local requirement is for Vienna brand all-beef dog and absolutely a natural casing for that "pop" when you bite it.  The buns need to be poppy-seed, and steamed.

The dogs are boiled... but again, when nobody's watching me, I grill them.

Bratwurst, I simmer in beer with onions and a couple of mashed garlic cloves, then finish on the grill.

But, that's a whole different culture. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/wink.gif

Mike
 
1,691
38
Joined Dec 23, 2000
"The late Mike Ryoko, ascerbic curmudgeon who wrote a column for one of the two major papers, I forgot which..."

Royko, who was indeed a curmudgeon's curmudgeon, actually worked for both Chicago papers. He started on the Sun-Times (or at least was there when I got here,) and was later wooed away by the Tribune, where he worked until his death. 

His place has been taken by columnist John Kass, whose curmudgeonly columns on politics, corruption,  and organized crime are the only things worth reading in today's Trib. We've got a lot of all three here in Illinois, so he's got plenty of work. He's also an avid barbecue/griller, and devotes some space on his website to this. Being of Greek extraction, he has some innate flair for this. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/wink.gif

Mike

Just as a side note- I spent two plus years as a member of a Federal Special Grand Jury which was principally charged with going after local organized crime.  If ahybody tries to tell you that Organized Crime is a figment of some prosecutor's imagination...

DON'T YOU BELIEVE IT!  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif

just ask your local bookie what he pays for the vig, or street tax. Or loses his kneecaps.
 
7,587
753
Joined Apr 3, 2008
I didn't know it was national hot dog day!  Too bad here in Greece we don't have any hot dogs.  But if we did I'm dreaming of mine topped with yellow mustard, raw diced onion, spicy chili, and cool slaw.

That's how we do them in the southeast.  You can't pay me money to top my dog with relish or saurkraut.
 
6,367
128
Joined Feb 1, 2007
Question: Who does put ketchup on hot dogs? And how did the practice start?

Reason I ask is that it's not done in the hot-dog capitals of the country. Neither New Yorkers nor Chicagoans would even consider it, for instance.

I lived in the Chicago area for the ten longest years of my life, and, frankly, you can keep all that garden truck that they pile on. I always thought they did that cuz they really didn't like the taste of the dogs.

Mostly I don't eat hot dogs. I'd like to claim this is cuz there are so many better tasting sausages, and that's partially correct. But, the truth is, I used to hustle hotdogs in the stands at Yankee Stadium and the Polo Grounds, and still can't get the smell out of my nose 45 years later.

When I do eat them I prefer mine two ways, one, unfortunately, no longer available.

1. Slathered with yellow mustard and top with oil-poached onions & peppers, the way they used to do it on the Sabrette carts.

2. Liberally smeared with Needick's hot dog relish. Sadly, that's gone the way of the dodo bird, and all my attempts to replicate it have failed. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/frown.gif
 
Last edited:
8,550
207
Joined Feb 13, 2008
KY,  I dunno my brother.

Same people put ketchup on dogs as put beans in chili, basically.  The nice thing about dogs is that condiments are more individual than communal.

Except for cocktail weenies in sweet and sour ketchup.  Yum-O.

Hot dogs are iconically American.  I think it might be a little provincial to claim New York or Chicago have sole rights to the quintessential hot dog.  Although, they certainly have a claim to rights for quintessential New York and Chicago style dogs.  But even then, there are hot dog stands in the hinterlands which do a pretty good job.  We got Petrillos out here too, y'know.

I've spent serious sausage time in both towns and don't find their dogs play a better tune than, say, a Pink's chili dogs (L.A.).  Worth mentioning that some of the dogs coming from SoCal's Armenian and Russian makers are just awesome.  

What about a deep south style chili dog?  With cole-slaw.

And what about...

BDL
 
6,367
128
Joined Feb 1, 2007
I don't claim those towns have the quintessential right. But they are associated, culinarily, with hot dogs.

I would suggest that if you lined up a hundred people, chosen at random from all over the country, and asked them where hot dogs are king, 98 of them would name either NY or Chicago. If you then mentioned Pinks specifically, they'd say, oh, yeah, LA. But they don't mean LA; they mean that one, specific restaurant.

Be honest. If Pink's closed tomorrow, would you go out of your way for a hot dog in LA?

Nor do I see topping a dog with chile anywhere in the same class as smearing it with ketchup.

Ketchup is a specific condiment that, overall, is not usually paired with hot dogs. I've been around hot-dog eaters all over the country, and can literally count the folks who used ketchup on them on my two hands---and maybe have a couple of fingers left over. So I was merely wondering why some people have gone that route, and what possible reason there is for the practice.
 
1,691
38
Joined Dec 23, 2000
" lived in the Chicago area for the ten longest years of my life,"

Was that because of the people, the food, or the weather?

Just asking. Having lived here for over 30 years now, after moving back from six years in  Santa Barbara and four in Seattle, I have a certain amount of sympathy with your comment.

BDL- Petrillo was the President of the Chicago Musicians Union for about one hundred years, but I assume you meant  Portillos, which is a pretty decent fast-food operation, specializing to some excent in the Chicago Hot Dog.. But what the he1l, all those Italians look the same to me, too.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif

Mike
 
8,550
207
Joined Feb 13, 2008
Portillo's yes.  My bad.  Petrillo's is possibly the only decent pizza in the SGV.  Am actually chowing down on an anchovy, jalapeno, olive and sausage pie right now, but sadly from Hungry Howie's.  

There are more than a few excellent hot dog places in LA area, especially in the SFV.  Also a bunch of great carts downtown around the courthouse, where I used to hang.  And leave us not forget Jody Maroni's which had more than a little something to do with the national haute dog trend.

Pink's is wonderful -- or at least it used to be before they redesigned the line and you could still get to it.  But the significance is not so much Pink's per se, but their creation of the chili dog itself.

You know as well as I, that a life lived without chili dogs would be drab and meaningless.  Yet there are those from Chi who eschew sport peppers.

BDL
 
Last edited:
1,691
38
Joined Dec 23, 2000
BDL-

Could you give me the address of the correct Pink's restaurant in LA?

My son is there this week and I'd like to suggest he give it a try if it's anywhere close to his hotel... he has a car. He has had some familiarity with the Chicago Hot Dog, and would be open to a new experience. He's planning to go to "Street" while he's there.. any thoughts?

Thanks

Mike
 

phatch

Moderator
Staff member
8,901
701
Joined Mar 29, 2002
When I was a kid (in NJ)  I liked ketchup on my dog. For most of my youth until my early 20s I didn't like mustard at all. It just tasted harsh to me. My kids are similar, not much of mustard eaters. Some do ketchup on the dog, some not. I suspect that is where ketchup on dogs comes from is kids who find mustard harsh.

I still don't want mustard on a hamburger for example. Just overpowers and kils the burger.
 

Latest posts

Top Bottom