My stock is a solid at 37 deg, is this normal?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by abefroman, Nov 4, 2013.

  1. abefroman

    abefroman

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    My stock is a solid at 37 deg, is this normal?  Its like a jello.

    Should I be adding more water to it?

    The latest stock was 2 ham hocks, and 1 smoked turkey leg boiled for 4 hours in about a gallon and half of water, then reduced to about 3 quarts, after leaving it in the fridge over night, it turned to a solid in the morning.
     
  2. teamfat

    teamfat

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    Like Jello?  Sounds to me that the stock turned out perfect!  That gelatin is exactly what you want.

    mjb.
     
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  3. soul vole

    soul vole

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    Yeah, there's a word for stock that gels in the fridge: "Success." /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
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  4. abefroman

    abefroman

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    Cool!

    Is that based on how long it cooks for + the water content + amount of collegen in the meat?
     
  5. teamfat

    teamfat

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    Yes, the amount of gelatin is related to the extraction of the good stuff out of the bones, mostly, and the pork skin, not so much the meat.  Low and slow is the way to go.

    mjb.
     
  6. french fries

    french fries

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    It's not normal. It's GREAT!!! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif  Only happens to me with my better stocks.
     
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  7. soul vole

    soul vole

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    I'm no expert on this, just a fellow student of the art, sharing notes and experience.

    How long it cooks for, the water content, the amount of collagen -- all of the above. Collagen converts to gelatin best around 180° or somewhere around there, basically a very low simmer. And it does take time, it doesn't happen instantly.

    Stocks are based more on bone than meat (as opposed to broths), and so they get gelatin from the collagen in bones and marrow but also especially from cartilage, which is loaded with it. So joints are good. Skin also has a lot of collagen. When I'm making chicken stock I often throw skin, necks, and feet in with the bones in order to maximize gelatin, because they're all great sources of collagen.

    Gelatin is just one factor in stock-making, and it sounds like on that count you're doing great!
     
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