My pan got pretty messed up, what to do?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by totte, Oct 20, 2016.

  1. totte

    totte

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    So.. this is my first (and only) Carbon steel pan and it used to work just fine, but now it's gotten all messed up. Food are sticking and there's sticky spots and what not.

    What should/can I do to restore it to it's former glory?

       
     
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Run it through a self cleaning cycle of your oven. Scrub of any residue and rust. Reseason.
     
  3. totte

    totte

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    Don't think my oven got a self cleaning cycle. :/
     
  4. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Well if have an outdoor grill or fire, build a hot one. cook off the gunk for about an hour.
     
  5. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Keep cooking with it. Use a little more fat if necessary. It will come back faster than stripping and re-seasoning.
     
  6. jay lancaster

    jay lancaster

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    I also vote for stripping it.  Hot fire...burn the heck out of it.  Scour it clean.  

    I season my pan once and it's done.
     
  7. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I've tried that path before in cast iron. I wasn't happy with the results. It led to slow flaking of parts of the patina and such. It becomes a constant annoyance that you have parts that are clean releasing and parts that aren't. 

    You can also burn it off on a gas stove. But there will be smoke and  some intense heat. Especially problematic in an apartment for example. 

    If none of those are an option, you can go for glass beading. Not sand blasting. But Sand Blasting is probably the best search term to look for to find such a business. Then ask if they do glass bead blasting. That will strip the patina quickly and you can then reseason and be on your way. 
     
  8. totte

    totte

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    Ye, I tried keep cooking with it as well and I'm not happy with the results. I want to strip it all together and starts over. However, I don't have access to a gas stove, unless I can borrow one at any of my chef friends work.

    Sand blasting it won't damage the pan? Because my dad's a mechanic and I got access to doing so at his place without having to pay or find someone to do the job for me. I've also read, you can blast with baking soda, not in a pan context though. Baking soda blasting is often used on fragile material, such as wood. Baking soda creates a microscopic explosion upon hit, which blasts or paint and what not without damaging wood. I wonder if that would work on a pan as well. I'll post a video of someone blasting random stuff with baking soda.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 16, 2016
  9. jay lancaster

    jay lancaster

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    If you can soda blast, I'd say try it.  Experiment on the under side of the handle just to be safe, but that might just do the job you need.

    Re-season & enjoy the pan.
     
  10. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Sand blasting would damage the pan . But the same equipment can use other media. Thus the glass beads. Bead blast, not sand blast.

    Or recycle the pan, buy a new one.
     
  11. jay lancaster

    jay lancaster

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    Who is the manufacturer?  Just curious.

    Also, what was your seasoning process?  I'm always curious about how other people go about such things.  Knowing how you seasoned the pan might help understand what went wrong.
     
  12. totte

    totte

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    DeBuyer
     
  13. jay lancaster

    jay lancaster

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    Yeah, don't be recycling the DeBuyer.  That's not as easily replaceable as a $7 carbon pan from the local restaurant supply store.  LoL

    Try soda blasting the bottom side of the handle and see what the results are.
     
  14. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    If you do think of recycling it... I'd pay the postage for you to dispose of it into my kitchen!
     
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  15. eloki

    eloki

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    Try adding some salt & set it on medium-high heat for a while (15-20 mins), scrape off as much crap as you can.  Or put it in the dishwasher. Either way, it can take the abuse. 

    You just need to give it a thorough clean, and start seasoning it again.