My first quality knife set

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Ugh, I had a feeling you guys wouldn't like that one. I feel tempted to get the maple board smith board. Maybe when I remodel my kitchen. 
 
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The effect of the board on the knife is increased as the steel gets harder and the sharpening angle steeper, technique of course factors in. Just about any thin suji at 12deg/side will very easily produce pinging noises on a plastic board. The MAC is not overly hard, and an angle of 15deg+/side, even just a microbevel, will reduce the problem. I don't feel there is any reason to go steeper than 20deg/side.


Rick


Oops, I need to correct that last statement, there is no need to go more obtuse than 20deg/side.
 
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Ugh, I had a feeling you guys wouldn't like that one. I feel tempted to get the maple board smith board. Maybe when I remodel my kitchen. 
I'm not sure your new MAC's edge will wait for the kitchen remodel.

Either the Michigan Maple Block (Post No.18) or a BoardSMITH board will do just fine in the meanwhile.  Just don't forget to saturate the new board in mineral oil before first use.

GS
 
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You got them at a Salvation Army store for $12.50, they looked like they were never used and the only thing missing was a steak knife but you didn't care because you where just  going to give most of those away anyhoo.

Rick
 
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Uuuuuuhhhhh, what am I missing here?  A picture of a Cutco Knife Block?  How does that relate to anything serious?

This must just be nothing more than a practical joke by IceMan.

Sigh.

GS
 
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Cutco wouldn't be my first choice for a cheapist option, but there are some extremely affordable cheap options if one dares buck the prevailing trends.
 
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IceMan is a Cheapist, kinda religion.
Well we all know what dogma amounts to.  But in actuality Cutco prices aren't cheap.

Say Brian, you're not going to recommend Henkles again, are you?  That was certainly a trend-bucker around here.

Rick
 
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No I wasn't planning on that Rick. Very odd suggestion, but fairly predictable. If anyone interested in my notion of cheapist blades I'd be suggesting Forgecraft or Old Hickory. But nobody has asked yet. Thanks though.
 
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Forgecraft is a good project knife, but the factory grind is real fat. Expect to spend at least 4 hours thinning, and that's if you know what you're doing. On the plus side, it's harder than most old dirty carbons at 58-59 HRC. Superior edge holding, but you can use a honing steel on this knife. It has cool history and anything you find is already vintage.

Old hickory is still in production so it doesnt have vintageness. You get what you pay for with these. I have the butcher knife as a loaner for bbq newbs.
 
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The nice thing about modern Old Hickorys is---- they don't use Hickory for handles anymore. They always were practically the only ones doing that but walnut is cheaper these days. That comes straight from Ontario Knife Company by the way.
 
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The nice thing about modern Old Hickorys is---- they don't use Hickory for handles anymore. They always were practically the only ones doing that but walnut is cheaper these days. That comes straight from Ontario Knife Company by the way.
haha!  "Old"  "Hickory"
 
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All this talk of handle wood has me thinking that perhaps the Ho wood(s) of the Northeast States are Larch and "false" red cedar (called red cedar, looks and smells it, but is actually a species of Juniper).

Both these are light and strong, and very resistant to rot. I'd have to consider them for when/if I do my first re-handle.



Rick
 
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That's something to consider. I went with hard dense woods and it definitely shifted the weight of my knives to be handle heavy. Then again a custom handle is about looks. You can also drill more holes in the metal to remove weight
 
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Red cedar is pretty stuff, the heart is a wonderful purple.  Lots of dead trees to be found in excellent shape so far as the wood is concerned, I'll keep an eye open if you want any.

Rick
 
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Hi all, I'm in the market for a quality knife set, I've inly owned cheap sets in the past. I'm considering a 17 piece Wusthof Classic Ikon set with a selling price of $860 or possibly a little less. Was wondering if this is a good set and a good price. In my brief research I've read that Wusthof prices tend to be high, but the price above isn't retail so I'm wondering if this is as cheap as it's going to get, or can I find a set from another brand that is just as good and possibly cheaper?
I'm not an expert cook, but I have bought my mom a bamboo knife set. She loves it so much.
 
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Hi FannyFan, welcome to cheftalk. This is an old post, and there is very much beyond your bamboo knives. Have fun here, it's a great site.
 
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Thanks for the help everyone! I have reduced my budget significantly since my original post and will take it slow and go with the suggestions made here and on other forums to start out with a few essentials knives. Galley Swiller, thanks for the detailed post I really appreciate it! The knives you suggested all seem like excellent choices, I am leaning towards the second two simply for aesthetics as I really don't like the writing on the MAC. Speaking of which, this poses a bit of a problem for me as I am a sucker for looks and while I am now aware that putting together a custom set from different manufacturers is ideal, I would love for all of the knives to match but I'm slowly letting go of that idea. Right now I am thinking of starting out with a chef's knife, pairing, maybe a utility knife and a bread knife. I do also want 6 steak knives.

I'm concerned about sharpening, it seems intimidating and I'd hate to ruin an expensive knife

Geez, there're sooo many directions you can go!

If performance and matching is an issue you could get a trifecta of Kaeru 270 Suji, Kaeru 150 Petty and Kaeru 240 Gyuto for about $480. Then throw in a non-matching Mac bread knife—if you realistically make a lot of sandwiches from uncut loaves. Or you can blow the budget on a drop-dead gorgeous gyuto.

If sharpening is an issue, I might recommend sticking with more rugged steels, as opposed to Japanese blades.

Big question is what your skill level as a cook is, how/what you cook, etc. In my day to day cooking, essential knives are a gyuto and a petty. It's not rocket science to sharpen, nor is it complicated to learn proper knife care/technique. Every cook has their wants/needs from tools.

I'm not you, but if I had your budget and starting from scratch I'd get the following—based on my tastes:
• Gyuto in the 200–350 price range (Gengetsu, Mazaki, Kaeru)
• Depending on what you cook, perhaps one specialty knife—bread, boner, fillet, honesuki, etc.
• Petty in the 150–250 price range
• Medium and fine grit whetstone or good combo stone (JKI 1k/6k combo, $135)
• With leftover money, perhaps sign-up for a sharpening class if you're near a good knife shop.
 
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