My Challenge to All

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by kuan, May 3, 2006.

  1. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Try to think of or come up with a dish which incorporates bitterness. Yep, bitter. Bitter doesn't have to be the main flavor, it can have a hint of bitterness which enhances the whole dish. I can think of one ingredient and that is Chinese bitter melon and used in a soup, it's OK, not mouth watering for most.

    What can you come up with?
     
  2. crazytatt

    crazytatt

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    I LOVE hulled strawberries, stuffed with goats cheese, and tomato concase, the drizzled w/ a balsamic reduction and fresh cracked black pepper.

    Bitter of the bat, and almost electric by the end and highly addictive.
     
  3. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Where's the bitter in that? Balsamic reduction?
     
  4. suzanne

    suzanne

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    I'm one of those few weirdos who LOVES bitter stuff -- I find nothing else gets the salivary juices going as much. Paul, too (although he tends just a bit more towards sour). So we always have at least one bitter element in our nightly salad -- Belgian endive, escarole, curly endive/chicory, radicchio. Even the outer leaves of romaine haVE an edge of bitterness.

    As for cooked dishes: anything braised in beer. And other bitter greens, cooked: kale, collards -- bring them on! :lips: (although I find that in long cooking, the inherent sweetness of collards takes over)

    Another bitter ingredient that is used to great effect is chocolate: think about mole, or adding a bit of bitter chocolate or cocoa powder to a batch of chili. And cocoa nibs! I ate at WD-50 recently, and two of the dishes had cocoa nibs, one main and one dessert. The dessert was: "Caramelized banana, smoked chocolate ice cream, stout" -- the stout was a foam and the nibs were sprinkled on top, so it had a double whammy of bitterness, which offset the (usually icky) sweetness of the banana really well.

    Coffee!!! Isn't there a classic Scandinavian dish of lamb or veal braised in coffee and cream? And tea, too -- Chinese tea-soaked meat dishes, and Earl Grey tea-flavored dessert items, which get the bitterness of the tea along with the floral/citrusy bergamot.

    ('Scuse me, my mouth is watering so, I have to go get another cup of [not overly bitter] coffee. :lol: )
     
  5. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    Rapini (rabe or rape) with orrechetta, anchovies, garlic, romano, chicken stock,chili flakes....comfort food with a strong bitter component.
     
  6. peachcreek

    peachcreek

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    I like a bitter beer to finish off my Beer-Cheddar soup. The bitterness help the flavor from being too rich and cloying at the finish.
     
  7. shahar

    shahar

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    nothing better than a GOOD dish of broccoli rabe. One of those simple dishes that are so hard to make right.
    Thinly sliced garlic sautéed just right. The rabe preblanched but quickly. A touch of hot pepper flakes.

    YUMM.

    I like to use romaine cooked. It acquires a bitter flavor that's amazing. On my menu now - grilled lamb stuffed romaine dolma with pinenuts.
     
  8. botanique

    botanique

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    I'm likin' this thread Kuan! Great stuff so far.

    Campari, lime, soy, garlic, marinated flank -- followed with a cayenne and cumin rub grilled to sear & sit (marinade is reduced & drizzled)

    Then of course there is Gentian root -- a small amount of decoction or tincture will add bitter, and act as a gastric stimulant. Perhaps we can come up with some new bitter apetizers / aperitifs that stray from the Euro / Asian / American norm.

    Cheers!
     
  9. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Ooh! You guys are good! :)
     
  10. jim berman

    jim berman

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    Grilled Raddichio?
     
  11. crazytatt

    crazytatt

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    The Goats cheese and balsamic...the redux is a very pleasent bitter, and goats cheese has a very mild bitter/acidity to it. I normally think sour w/ bitter?.
     
  12. chrose

    chrose

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    :lips: I was thinking of a piece of grilled tuna with a knob of black pepper/garlic butter melting on top served on a bed of grilled and raw sliced endive.

    Or a pork filet stuffed with Boursin, grilled and sliced on a composed salad of raddichio, endive, chicory etc. with a creamy balsamic vinaigrette.
    Ahh grilling season!!!:D
     
  13. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    CH, whens dinner be there at 8! Sounds good.
     
  14. kevinvilla

    kevinvilla

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    There's a traditional Filipino dish called pinakbet. It's eggplant, green beans, lots of vegetables, fish sauce, and bitter melon. My mom also makes stir-fried bittermelon with oyster sauce. Her friend makes a really good pickled daikon radish with jalapeno, garlic, and bittermelon.

    I never understood bittermelon. My parents love it, their parents love it, the parents of my friends love it, but all the kids hate it. Oh well.
     
  15. even stephen

    even stephen

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    Lobster cauliflour bisque served capuccino style.
    Top with whipped cream, unsweetened of course,
    flavored with a few drops of good white truffle oil.
    Dust cream with good quality bitter cocoa or micro
    planed unsweetened high quality dark chocolate.
    Flavors seem to go together. First saw it from
    Kevin Rathburn.
     
  16. nentony

    nentony

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    I've added hops to marinades before, good with pork. Also, a leaf or 2 in a sachet when cooking greens. A bright bitter taste. A little goes a long way. I have seen recipes for eggs using hops, but never tried it. Mostly, I use it in beer, I'm a homebrewer:beer:

    Tony
     
  17. suzanne

    suzanne

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    Shahar -- Is there a difference in degree of bitterness between the dark outer leaves and the light hearts for romaine? I keep thinking that if I ever had to develop a soup or veg recipe for a restaurant, I'd do something with the outer romaine leaves that usually get stripped away and thrown out. Such a waste!
     
  18. shahar

    shahar

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    Porcini cocoa fettucini with braised venison and fungi gravy

    Venison like other game meat works great with bitter aromatics. Cocoa seemed perfect to me. Than I found out of course somebody beat me to it by a few hundred years.
     
  19. tigerwoman

    tigerwoman

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    sauteed broccoli rabe with garlic

    the taiwanese especially love bitter melon - it's an acquired taste for most.

    horseradish has a bitter edge to it

    arugula mixed with greens like watercress and dressed with citrus - nice ying yang of bitter/pepper with acidic flavors

    certain cheeses have a bitter tang to them which if combined with the right degree of ripeness and something to conterbalance work well and are delish - like blue cheeses, older bries, goat cheeses, sheep cheeses, sharp cheeses.

    asian long beans seem to have a slightly bitter edge to them - they are not really palatable unless well cooked (definitely not to be eaten raw)


    so a nice salad is arugula, watercress, fresh spinach with goats cheese, marinated artichokes and roasted peppers in a meyer lemon vinaigrette - can add grilled fish or chicken to that for a main course dish.

    could also sautee the greens for a hot side or compliment to protein

    another dish would be sauteed long beans with a balsamic glaze. Use fresh rosemary and garlic.

    grilled radiccio adds a nice bitter component and interesting look to dishes.
     
  20. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    A couple of the markets are open and farmers are bringing in SPRINGTIME....amazing how many of the greens have a bitter component.

    baby arugula....making an open faced sandwith with steak, arugula, goatcheese and mustard

    escarole....sauteed with onions, garlic, white raisins and apple cider viniager

    micro sprouts...radish...ooooeeee....buttered bread and radish sprouts
    mixed sprouts....not sure what I'll do with them

    Asparagus can have a sweet bitterness to it.....

    Got the end of the rhubarb and the beginning of the strawberries! Hurray!

    umpteen years ago a couple of ACF juniors did a smoking class for me and made dinner, they wrapped romain around parmesan and bread crumbs, braised um and they were killer. Really great.