my apprentice wants to move on :(

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by Cdp, Sep 14, 2017.

  1. Cdp

    Cdp

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    18 years Chef recent promo to Sous
    ok, we all been here,


    apprentice 2nd year nearly a3rd in talent.


    basically she did well got along way but can't justify the hours vs pay story and yeah wants to do less headches and stress and work normal hours normal fair pay.

    top of her class for most things something else,
    always put in 100% never had an isssue ,



    so try win her back or let her go???

    going into xmas with a freshy is going to be royally f*CKED.
     
  2. phaedrus

    phaedrus

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    That's tough! On the one hand you hate to see a talented person give up but realistically she has to do what's best for herself. Face it- us chefs, we're all crazy to do what we do!
     
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  3. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    Let her go! Be happy you had someone good for 2 years. You never realize what you have until it gone. But, in her case you can't meet her wants and $$$$ needs. If this was a front line cook you would be able to throw some money out there to keep her. You said she "wants to do less headaches and stress and work normal hours normal fair pay." It doesn't look like it's only one thing. This business is not normal hours, less headaches, less stress and fair pay. I think if you could have offered these you would have. What she's looking for doesn't exist in this business. There maybe operations with less stress but, lets face it they all come with Headaches........ChefBillyB
     
  4. Jayvader

    Jayvader

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    CIA Sept '99
    if it was her here asking if she should stay or go to another kitchen , then for a young talent i always say go, dont burn the bridge but go. leaving the business is different story though

    she will learn more in the next 4 years working in 4 different jobs than she would working for you for 4 more years in or out of a kitchen.

    stay in touch, be a mentor, keep her on the right path, most people i know that walk away from a kitchen either are thankful that they left or have a burning desire to return to it because sitting at a desk for 8 hours a day is mind numbing no matter what the pay/hours.

    and who's to say she's not open to the idea of working 2 or 3 weekends during the holidays, an already trained part time on call employee is worth its own weight in gold
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2017
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  5. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Better now than in a month or two. The next apprentice might even be better!

    It is tough to lose a good one, but it sounds like the honeymoon is over. When that happens, even if you win her back, it will probably crop up again. And probably sooner rather than later. Best to have an amicable parting.

    Even if you win her back, the Xmas season ain't going to cut down on her hours, stress, and responsibilities. It will just amplify her reasons for wanting to leave.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2017
    linecookliz likes this.
  6. Cdp

    Cdp

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    18 years Chef recent promo to Sous
    your right lads,
    think it is time for her to move on gracefully,

    tar mate for the input.

    one... thing that shits beyond no end is ....poured the little tricks simple ones but ones that work that were passed on to you as you were learning now....kinda feel it was for no reason but your right in saying let her go now and you might be able to use her in the holidays
     
  7. cronker

    cronker

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    I've always found that by the time your employee comes to you with this conversation, the writing is on the wall. The decision to move on has been mulling around in her own head for some time already.
    You could offer her better money or hours, but truth be told, you're just postponing the inevitable.
    It sounds to me, from what you have said, that she is probably thinking about getting out of kitchens altogether.
    Wish her luck, let her know you will be a good referee for her and impart the little pearl of wisdom that everything she has experienced and learned from the kitchen world will serve her well no matter what she finds herself doing.

    Then move on and find your next superstar.
    Look at some the famous chef trajectories-
    Albert Roux > Marco Pierre White > Gordon Ramsay > Marcus Wareing > Angela Hartnett > Clare Smyth
    There is a family tree, some serious DNA there. At some point, every apprentice must move on from their master.
     
  8. stormrider

    stormrider

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    Someday this crazy slavery chef's life style of ours will have to change to appeal to the new gadgets generation. Its already happening here in London, I mean, the ambiental change, specially during these Brexit' days, although Chefs and Managers are still either refusing to see or not seeing the change at all.

    There are over 60k vacant kitchen jobs in London; every kitchen that I know of is either short or very short on staff and instead of them bosses offering us staff better conditions (pay rate, working hours...), they're doing the exact opposite, that is, squeezing us even harder than ever before, only to loose even more staff, some whom were real loyal and long timers in the restaurant. (Edit: Not that the restaurant is in bad financial shape; the owner is still changing his Rolls Royce Phantom every year.)

    Real passionate talents, like your apprentice, will be wasted to do shit good pay office jobs.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2017
  9. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    With an average profit margin of around 3%, how do restaurants raise pay? What is the solution? I couldn't figure it out during my twelve years of being an owner...and my Rolls Royce Phantom was a 20 year old truck.

    I could raise prices...and lose customers. I could get my landlord to lower my rent...like that was going to ever happen. I was on top of my financial numbers, so nothing there. I could do more covers, but not really, three full turns on the weekends. I couldn't figure it out, but maybe there are smarter heads out there because I would love an answer to what was my conundrum.

    Any body got one?
     
  10. stormrider

    stormrider

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    You can always do like everybody else and just squeeze your chefs a little more for that extra %. You could for example use a bonus system, paying the bare minimum salary and promising bonuses, then deduct their wastage from their bonus.
     
  11. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    If everybody else is already doing that and people are still leaving the industry in droves...?
     
  12. stormrider

    stormrider

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    Exactly why there are over 60k vacant chef jobs in London.
     
  13. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    So solution?
     
  14. foodpump

    foodpump

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    I don't understand.

    When I did my apprenticeship, it was a three year contract with my employer. Leaving that employer before the three years would void the contract.

    There were caveats, however. If my Chef was replaced with another Chef who did not complete an apprenticeship, or if more than 50% of the brigade did not complete an apprenticeship, I would be eligible to find another employer that met the criteria to train an apprentice.

    I dunno the word "apprenticeship" is so mis used, (deleted)-up, and vague, that it has about as much meaning as "chef"......
     
  15. panini

    panini

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    I've been associated with the apprenticeship program at our local community college. When i take an apprentice, I know full well they are going to leave. I've always kept a teacher - student relationship throughout. Never abused them, never pigeon-holed them. Made sure they experienced every inch of the back and front. When they have learned all they can and their 2 yr. stint is up, I try to guide and support their next move. Most have gone on to the hot side.
    If I enter into an agreement as foodpump states, I interpret that as an internship.
    just me.
     
  16. Peter_Commis_Chef

    Peter_Commis_Chef

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    Let her go. It's her life at the end of the day and to some people life is too short for working in this industry. I'd be in a similar position to your apprentice and I'd be extremely disappointed if my head chef didn't understand or was angry towards me for wanting the best for MYSELF, when I do tell him I'm going to leave.