Mung Bean Pancakes: Yuck?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by anneke, Jan 15, 2002.

  1. anneke

    anneke

    Messages:
    1,586
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Culinary Instructor
    I have to make these for class tomorrow. Problem is, I'm not very familiar with them and I thought the ones we did in demo today were ugly and gross!

    Our teacher fried them up like regular pancakes, sprinkling some roughly chopped bean sprouts and sliced green onion on the uncooked side before flipping.

    Two questions:

    1 - Is this how you cook them? I was sure I had a discussion about this with somebody who told me there was a special press for them. Did I imagine this?

    2 - How do you make them both tasty AND pretty? Here's a clue: they are used to plate chicken and beef satays with two sauces.

    Suggestions?:confused:
     
  2. monpetitchoux

    monpetitchoux

    Messages:
    221
    Likes Received:
    11
    Something tells me you are eating these pancakes out of context or that the person who was making these in class didn't do a good job or both. Mung bean pancakes are Korean in origin, I'm pretty sure. It's usually in the appetizer section of the menu in a larger restaurant. Or if you are lucky enough to have a Korean restaurant that specializes in pancakes it should be on the top of the list. So the satay doesn't really go with it. The pancake usually has a soy sauce-based sauce for dipping to go with it. But lots of Asian cultures have bean-based pancakes where the beans are soaked over night and then ground in the blender in the morning to make a batter (India, with their many dal pancakes comes to mind). I've had them cooked for me once by a friend (she's Korean) and I pay for them at Korean restaurants. It tastes pretty neutral to me. Most people object to the texture (these are the same folks who tend not to like peas or beans), which is why, oddly, I like them. If the restaurant cooks them the way I like (crispy on the outside and spread not too thick and served as soon as it comes out of the pan) then I return to that particular restaurant when I get a hankering. Sorry you didn't enjoy it as much as I did the first time I had it.

    If there is a press for these pancakes, then it may not be the Korean kind. The batter is loose like regular bisquick pancakes and can be poured on a hot griddle.

    I'm sorry I don't know how actually to make these. But maybe if you season the batter a little before cooking, it won't be so bland. I'd try it from a Korean restaurant that will hopefully make it well.
     
  3. risa

    risa

    Messages:
    386
    Likes Received:
    11
    There's also a Thai mung bean pancake that I've never eaten before. It's also made with the skinless mung beans. I like the Korean ones, but I've never made them myself other than with an instant mix. I do have a recipe or two from reliable cookbooks for making them from scratch. I'll review them when I get home and get back to you.
     
  4. cape chef

    cape chef

    Messages:
    4,508
    Likes Received:
    32
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I did a little reading on the Mung bean to learn more about it's uses, This is what I found.

    The seed of the plant "Vigna radiata" is a native of India where it has long been under culivation. It has now spread to china, SE Asia, the USA and the caribbean, and E and C Africa. It is used not only for human food but also as a forage crop and as green manure. Several crops a year are possible, since the plant grows quickly.

    In India, Mung beans are also known as the green or goldan gram, depending on there colour. Split and peeled, all kinds reveal a pale yellow inside.

    Used as a dry Pulse, Mung beans need no soaking, cook relitivly quickly, have a good flavor and are easily digestible: A collection of merite which few other legumes can match.

    There are two main uses for the beans in China: To make bean sprouts( The Chinese name which means "Pea shoots" to distinguish them from the soya bean sprouts) and as a sourse of starch for mung bean vermicelli ( cellophane noodles, "Fen Si ")
    These noodles are a popular ingredient in Chinese cooking.

    I agree with Petitchoux advice on the technique of cooking and serving the pancakes.

    Anyway Anneke..Good luck
    cc
     
  5. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,743
    Likes Received:
    346
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    Definitely Korean in origin. They're also known as Korean pancakes and yes, that's how they're fried up. About your second question, this may be just one of those things that looks good on paper but doesn't really work irl. Korean and Southeast Asian? Hmmm... worth a try I guess.

    Kuan
     
  6. anneke

    anneke

    Messages:
    1,586
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Culinary Instructor
    Green manure, eh?
    Yup, that pretty much describes what was produced in the demo...


    Well, I'm fresh out of my lab and here's the verdict.

    I had to work at it a bit to make them taste like anything but I think I got it right and it worked. They taste like falafel without the crunch. I agree that they are not really suited to go with satays. Some of the students were using up their batter to bring the rest home but frankly they start tasting bad so quickly after they cool down. Definitely the thinner the better. We used them for napoleons to sandwich sesame julienned veg. Totally inappropriate if you ask me. (but my spicey peanut sauce made up for a lot!)

    As I was munching on the pancakes, I had the feeling I was eating something very healthful. I'll have to work on it to find a pleasing way to eat them. Are they served straight up in Korea or as an accompaniement? With what?

    Thanks for your research CC and everone else's input too. Really helps a lot. Makes my learning so much more complete to hear from you guys![​IMG]
     
  7. cabal

    cabal

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    10
    I tried a vietnamese version and it was served with chopped chilli peppers in fish and soya sauce drizzled over it
     
  8. garlicginger

    garlicginger

    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    10
    Sounds like teach is trying to take some short cuts. To make the Korean pancakes, you must first soak dry mung beans and rice (in separate bowls) for 3-4 hours. They are then put into a blender (this is a shortcut, originally they were put into a mortar and pestle) with some water and whizzed until a thick paste is obtained. The recipes I usually use marinates thinly sliced pork in garlic, ginger, sesame oil and pepper for an hour or so. To asssemble: Drop spoonfuls of the batter on an oiled frying pan. As batter sets, lay on top - strips of marinated pork, shredded scallion, strips of chili peppers and chopped coriander. Fry about 5 minutes, then flip and cook until brown and crispy. Serve hot with a dipping sauce made of kochu chang and vinegar. These are usually a drinking snack, served hot off the griddle. Some Korean restaurants call them "Korean pizza" but that's clearly a misnomer.
     
  9. anneke

    anneke

    Messages:
    1,586
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Culinary Instructor
    Very interesting Garlicginger..

    To tell you the truth, our old teachers are trying to be 'modern' and are teaching what they believe the times dictate, which is a mishmash of foreign ingredients. Just make it look pretty, and most of all, make it look 'different'. No regard for taste, tradition, etc...

    I don't mind so much if you came up with a pretty way to serve up mung bean pancakes in a way that didn't look traditional. What I really object to is that they don't explain how they are traditionally made, where they come from etc. There is no respect for the ingredients and their traditional pairings which are more often than not, flawless. We should know the source of ingredients and recipes before we start distorting them to fit our purposes, don't you think?
     
  10. monpetitchoux

    monpetitchoux

    Messages:
    221
    Likes Received:
    11
    Amen to that, Sister.

    precisely why I am not a fan of fusion cuisine and am looking forward to its death.

    Don't get me wrong here. I am not adverse to innovation in cooking and serving food. It's the lack of respect for the roots from which ingredients and dishes come that I find offensive. That and the imposed value of it. Just think about the prices found on the menu of a typical Vietnamese restaurant compared to a restaurant that serves banana spring rolls with vanilla creme anglaise.

    Now, about those mung bean pancakes. I'd stick with the cue from the Korean restaurants and offer them as appetizers. I'd modernize it by doing what your teacher was doing. I'd grill the thinly sliced and marinated pork separately and then arranging them on top of the pancake. But I'd make the pancakes tiny so that they'd resemble blinis. I'd try to thicken the sauce so that I can squeeze a small bit on the pork and then top with a small sprinkle of toasted sesame and/or shredded green onion. I'd serve them this way at a cocktail party. As a sit down appetizer/first course, I'd mound a small green salad (dressed lightly with a dressing based on rice vinegar, soy sauce, and soy bean oil) in the middle of a plate, cook the pancakes in ovals about three inches in length x one and a half inch in width, then arrange the pork (cooked as before) on the pancakes. Then I'd arrange three of these on the salad like a pyramid (got to find a way to make the meat stay on the pancake). At the top of the salad, where the points of the three pancakes meet, I'd top with shredded green onion and sesame seeds. The sauce made with kochu chang and vinegar I'd spoon on the plate in between the pancakes.

    I don't understand how one can be taught to be "modern." It's like trying to teach someone to be creative. It can't be taught. What can, and should be taught, in my not so humble opinion, is the traditional way in which dishes have been done. Modernizing and creativity can only be inspired if one has a firm foundation. Otherwise one would just be cooking without direction.
     
  11. isa

    isa

    Messages:
    3,236
    Likes Received:
    10
    Anneke,


    Could you please post the mung bean pancake recipe?
     
  12. anneke

    anneke

    Messages:
    1,586
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Culinary Instructor
    1 c Green mung beans, pre-soaked
    1/2 Water
    2 Eggs
    2 Rashers Bacon
    60 gr diced Onion
    1 cl Garlic
    1 tsp GInger
    dash Sesame oil
    Sambal (to taste)
    1/4 c Oil
    1/2 c Bean Sprouts
    1 Green Onion
    S&P


    Sweat off the garlic, onion, ginger and bacon. Cool.
    Purée the remaining ingredeients (except bean sprouts & green onion) in a blender until relatively smooth.
    Add a tbsp of flour if the mixture is too wet.
    Fry like pancakes, in an oiled non-stick pan. As the first side is setting, sprinkle a few slices of green onion and chopped bean sprouts before flipping.


    My own preference is to omit the bean sprout, spread the batter nice and thin, and serve à la minute. If you season them right, they can be pretty tasty...
     
  13. isa

    isa

    Messages:
    3,236
    Likes Received:
    10
    Green mung beans Anneke? Are they fresh or dried? The ones I have are yellow and dry.


    Thank you for the recipe!


    I too would omit the bean sprouts.




    P.S. I have a recipe for a really good mung beans dal, let me know if you would like it.
     
  14. anneke

    anneke

    Messages:
    1,586
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Culinary Instructor
    Dried green mung beans Isa.
    We were told it wouldn't work with the yellow ones. I'm not sure why; they both should have the same starch content I would imagine.
     
  15. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,743
    Likes Received:
    346
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    I'm a total fan of fusion cuisine, but not as presented in mainstream America. Everything I do is fusion, I can't escape it. It's in my blood. Last night we had moroccan style lamb teppan with toasted tahini dipping sauce. Not bad I tellya :)

    Kuan
     
  16. cape chef

    cape chef

    Messages:
    4,508
    Likes Received:
    32
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Kuan, That sounds really tasty.
    Question, How did you "Toast" the Tahini?
    cc
     
  17. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,743
    Likes Received:
    346
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    I toasted the tahini in a regular saute pan. Kinda reminds me a bit of making brown roux.

    Kuan
     
  18. cape chef

    cape chef

    Messages:
    4,508
    Likes Received:
    32
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Thank you Kuan, Thats what I imagined.

    Did you add anything else to this tahini dip?
    cc
     
  19. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,743
    Likes Received:
    346
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    Yep, Lotsa Mayo, Lemon Juice, Soy Sauce, white pepper... rice vinegar, honey. I think that's it.

    Kuan