mousses vs. bavarians

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by madgoose, Aug 27, 2005.

  1. madgoose

    madgoose

    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    10
    hey everyone,

    i've been debating on whether to use a bavarian or mousse filling in conjunction with a sponge cake for a practical, i've been wondering if anyone could tell me some of the similarities and differences between the two, i've checked in my book but all it seems to have is the procedures for making them.

    thanks
     
  2. dano1

    dano1

    Messages:
    338
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    why not make a small batch of each and taste side by side?
     
  3. madgoose

    madgoose

    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    10
    taste isn't the only factor i'm looking for similarities and difference in terms of structure and the making of as well as taste to be quite honest i'm not that fond of mousses and bavarians but it's required for the practical so that's why i was asking.
     
  4. coffeekitten

    coffeekitten

    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Culinary Student
    Even though you may not particularly like things. I find it very important to at least try them and adjust flavors and such. It is very important to being a good chef, because its not about what you like its about the customer. (Unless you are alergic or a vegetarain... or if it makes you vomit... :eek: )

    Good luck on your exam.
    I know i had fun making triple chocolate bavarios when i was in that class. If you need anymore advice dont hesitate to ask.
    Coffeekitten
     
  5. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,713
    Likes Received:
    324
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    You need to make both, and you need to make them both at least fifty times before you can master them. You will learn a lot about what you're asking about when you make them. Expect unwanted results during the process.
     
  6. zukerig

    zukerig

    Messages:
    93
    Likes Received:
    10
    A crème bavarian is relatively easy to prepare, if you exercise ordinary care in the procedure. It is served unmolded generally, but you could also place it in a collared soufflé dish to become an iced dessert, or surround it with biscuits à la cuilliere (ladyfingers) to be transformed into a charlotte russe.

    If you are going to serve the bavarian in a decorative or ring mold, select a mold which will hold 2 quarts when filled almost to the brim for ease of unmolding. If you choose to made a basic liqueur bavarian, be imaginative and consider making a Beachcomber (equal parts white créme de cacao & coffee liqueur) or fruit bavarian (fruit eau de vie or brandy, or kirschwasser) – or whatever best appeals to your discernment. A chocolate bavarian is also a possibility (which can likewise be flavored with amaretto, kirsch, or coffee or orange liqueur.)

    In the end, if you opt to prepare a crème bavarian, you have some other wonderful ones to shortlist – such as, caramel, pineapple, and pear w/ raspberry coulis. Classic fruit versions are usually made w/out crème anglaise, consisting simply of sweetened fruit purée, gelatin, and whipped cream. Many culinary pros refer to these desserts as mouses, and so they are often included in the mousse sections of the repertoire. Note that a bavarian containing fresh fruit shouldn’t be frozen.

    Here's the outline for preparing a simply elegant molded bavarian: Slice a yellow génoise horizontally into three equal layers; place one layer in the bottom of a 10-inch springform pan, reserving remaining layers for another use.

    Prepare a lime bavarian (or a citrus mousse). Pour the bavarian over the génoise base. Glaze the top with a thin layer of lemon-cream Jean Louis. Garnish the turned-out presentation w/ fresh-sliced fruit and brightly colored tropical sauces -- maybe kiwi, mango, and/or passionfruit.