More of making bread...This time, instant yeast.

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by rocio, Jun 13, 2005.

  1. rocio

    rocio

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    Hello all!
    I have a little problem. I was given instant yeast, and I want to use it for my bread. I looked in the internet for differences with normal dry yeast, and I only found that you can mix it with the dry ingredients instead of having to put it in lukewarm water....But, what about the rising time? is it faster? Somewhere I read that with instant yeast I don´t need a second rising, but they were very vague and only left me more confused. Can someone please give me some directions?
    thanks a lot!!!
    Rocio :chef:
    PS. Sorry to ask so many many things...
     
  2. cookieguy

    cookieguy

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    Instant dry yeast differs from active dry yeast in that it is fine and free-flowing. While active dry yeast (nuggets) is re-hydrated in warm water (not over 90F), instant dry yeast is simply added to the dough. Try to not let cold water hit it. You may find you can reduce mix times due to release of glutathione which has a strong reducing effect on gluten proteins. There may be a 10 minute prooftime lag with instant dry yeast. Try it out and see what happens.

    In its vacuum sealed pack instant dry yeast can have a shelf life of almost two years. However, once opened you should use it as quickly as possible. Although if you close it tightly and refrigerate it can last quite a while.

    As for use levels. If compressed yeast is used at 100 parts then active dry yeast is used at about 45 parts. Instant dry yeast would be used at about 33 parts. In both cases the difference can be made up with water.
     
  3. harpua

    harpua

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    At the bakery I worked at, we only used instant yeast. We would make up the dry ingredients, including the yeast, and then add the wet. We mixed it and then let it rise in a tub. After that, we weighed it out, let it rise, and then shaped it. We put it in the cooler to rise overnight. I think active dry would rise too fast without developing flavor...
     
  4. kylew

    kylew

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    Instant yeast is the product of improved technology. The main difference is that instan yeast has about 25% more live yeast than active dry yeast. This means you can use 25% less instant yeast as a substitute for active dry yeast. If a recipe calls for 2 tsp of active dry yeast, you can use 1 3/4 tsp instant yeast. The reverse is true as well. If you have active fry yeast on hand, and a recipe calls for instant yeast, use 125% of the given amount.

    As has been said, you do not need to prove instant yeast. It can get mixed right in with the dry ingredients. THe only caveats are things like salt and cinnamon. THey are both yeast killers and should be kept away form the yeast for as long as possible. WHen I use instant yeast I dump all the dry ingredients into the bowl. I just put the yeast and salt on opposite sides. THis way if I get distracted, the yeast and salt are not sitting on top of each other before I mix.

    The tiem difference between active dry and instant is also about 25%. THis means if you swap 1:1 instant for active dry, things should happen about 25% faster. I don't think this is a good thing. Time=flavor development. Longer rises= more flavor. If you use the 25% reduction swap the times should be the same.
     
  5. rocio

    rocio

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    Thank you all for your comments and explanations. I´ll give instant yeast a try and see about the loss of flavor because of the quicker rise.
    Buen Provecho!
    Rocio :chef:
     
  6. harpua

    harpua

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    Okay, I have a brioche recipe that I want to make at home, but it calls for fresh yeast. How should I substitute active dry yeast for that?
     
  7. cookieguy

    cookieguy

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    By fresh yeast I take it you mean compressed. Please see my first reply above. To convert to active dry use 45% of the compressed amount and make up the rest with water. Just for general interest there are two other types of yeast available. One is cream yeast which replaced compressed yeast in large commercial bakeries. It is pumpable and comes by tanker. The other is inactive dry yeast which is basically used for flavor. Have fun.
     
  8. chef_isa

    chef_isa

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    Harpua, 3:1 fresh yeast to instant yeast. with good results.