More demi-glass discussion

nicko

Founder of Cheftalk.com
Staff member
4,343
361
Joined Oct 5, 2001
So I was in a local cooking school yesterday where they were also selling food products and they had some various brands of ready made demi-glace and boy were they pricy ($12.95 for a tiny container). I was tempted to buy just to try it out as the ingredients where all natural (for the most part). But, I didn't the price was too high for me and the last time someone gave me some pre-made demi-glace I couldn't tell whether they had given me a bucket of brown salt or demi. Actually there is one brand that is made here locally by a chef but it is the real deal he just puts it in buckets and sells it to local shops who don't have the resources to make it themselves. The product is outstanding but expensive. I can't remember his name of hand.

Anyways I was just wondering if everyone is making their own or do you also buy some on occasion. If so what brands have you used. Since I am not in a professional kitchen I make some at home ever so often and freeze it, but I wonder what options there are for cooks at home that don't have the time for this.
 
149
10
Joined Nov 17, 2002
This is a pretty good question Nicko...

Through food shows etc. I have tried virtually kajillions of these form of Demi products and most of them just taste like heavy brown sauces out of a package to me...

One that I do like, although I have never used it as a demi, but have used it as a flavor enhancer for Demi's and other brown sauces is Minor's Demi base, not a bad flavor as far as bases go...I saw some at Costco a couple weeks ago, so it is available on the retail market.

Is an interesting concept of making demi to sell by the bucket...if you ever run across that product again, I would be interested in contact information...

Peace,
Cheffy
 
958
12
Joined Aug 15, 2004
I guess by now its no secret that I like to make demi-glace. Took me 3 days the first time, but with a little more efficiency, I got it down to 2 whole days.

After the first time I made it, I wanted to compare it to others, and it appeared to me that Demi-Glace Gold was being recommended by many on the internet as one of the best.

Actually, it seems pretty good. However, I use a Dry Sack sherry type white wine to cut it, rather than water or Madeira or such.

Anyway, I've given away to friends my leftover DGG packets, since I now prefer my own.

One question I have, is demi-glace only pertain to brown sauce, or as Escoffier said, "It is the perfection of brown sauce"? I was in a restaurant that had a catfish dish with Fish Demi-glace. It definitely wasn't brown!

doc
 
149
10
Joined Nov 17, 2002
I am sure they just worded the menu that way...Chef Augusta would roll over in his grave over that one I am sure...

I would be almost certain they made some form of fumet and called it demi-glace...

Cheffy
 
958
12
Joined Aug 15, 2004
They also had a "French Onion Soup", which turned out to be clear onion broth with some cheese browned on top. Very untraditional!

doc
 
818
16
Joined Oct 13, 2001
Sounds like the chef at this joint is perhaps a want to be Escoffier. I think if you want to make different dishes thats fine but just dont confuse the customers by calling it after a traditional dish or sauce.
As for the demi,well I used to make it in the main kitchens of the hotel casinos but now working in a hospital kitchen the best I can do is beef broth with minors base. I realy like your local made by the chef stuff,what a great idea,Hmmmmmmmmm.....................Doug.......... ...
 
958
12
Joined Aug 15, 2004
Hi Greg,
Nope. Believe it or not, it was Forepaugh's. Company I work for took us there as a "reward".

Friends and I went to Forepaugh's shortly after it opened many years ago. While waiting to "go upstairs" to be seated, we were made to walk around and around on the first floor while a lady played the piano. After walking for over an hour and a half, we left.

I'd always heard that cream, eggs, and butter were the main fare there all these years, but had never gone back.

What a surprise to find onion broth labeled as "French Onion Soup", and one of the team members asked me what I thought of it. The Project Manager's eyes zeroed in on me, and not wanting to appear ungratious, I said, "Well, I guess its ok, but I think normally the onions are a bit carmelized in a classic FOS." The eight people around the table who had ordered as I had done, enthusiastically voiced their support of my observation. And I didn't hurt the PM's feelings in the process. Whew! Close call!

But the Catfish with Demi-glace.... Maybe the fake DG was there to take your attention away from the fact that they didn't remove all the bones from the fillet?!

doc
 
23
10
Joined Feb 10, 2004
In my training in Paris, we made demis from chicken and fish as well as veal. The idea makes sense to me, think concentrated ,tight flavor. As far as commercially available, I've used product from Aromont. For me the price issue is negated by the alternative production cost as well as the consistant quality(but I'm also using this in a private chef environment, not commercial)
 

Latest posts

Top Bottom