monster rise of bread dough in the fridge

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by phoebe, Mar 11, 2019.

  1. phoebe

    phoebe

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    I'm making Peter Reinhart's "Everyday 100% Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread" from his Artisan Breads Every Day for the first time. I put the dough in the fridge at 12:30 pm and it's already more than doubled by 6 pm, pressing firmly against the plastic wrap in the biggest bowl I have! Two questions:

    1) I don't intend on taking it out until tomorrow morning. Will it be OK in that bowl until then? (I picture some "I Love Lucy" episode with the dough pouring out of the fridge).

    2) The recipe calls for "flattening" the dough and shaping into 5 x 8 inch rectangles to put into 4 1/2 by 8 1/2 inch loaf pans, letting them rise for 2 to 3 hours until just an inch above the rim. Should I make sure that the dough has room to rise, even if it means cutting some away (and using the excess for something else)? Or if the dough--even with "flattening"--is still past the 1 inch mark--should I forget the extra proofing and go straight to baking?
    Thanks for any advise!
     
  2. harpua

    harpua

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    It’s hard to say because I can’t see how much dough you have, but it probably rose that much in the fridge because it was maybe a bit on the warm side when you put it in? My guess is that it has already risen most of the way by now but it just depends on how big your batch of dough is.

    I would slap it down now and leave it in the fridge, or if you are scared you can divide it now and put it in two large bowls (or just use your pans as a vessel) and put in the fridge. In the morning, flatten it out to even out all the bubbles, roll or fold it into the shape of the pan and let it rise for a second time. Generally a standard loaf should start the final rise reaching halfway or less up the pan, especially if it’s proofing for 2-3 hours. It’s ready when it’s above the rim of the pan. I mean, generally speaking.

    If you use your bread pans to store the dough in the fridge, you get a sneak peak of what to expect when it rises.
     
  3. phoebe

    phoebe

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    Thank you so much, harpua, for your response. Yes, the dough was still a bit warm when it went into the fridge. The directions specified that after the third 10 minute rest it should be covered and refrigerated immediately. Next time maybe I’ll let it sit awhile longer (or use a bigger bowl). It’s now almost 11:30 and it seems to have calmed down, so I’ll just let it be. Tomorrow I’ll flatten it out enough to make sure the dough has some room to rise in the loaf pans.
     
  4. harpua

    harpua

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    How did it turn out?
     
  5. phoebe

    phoebe

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    Thank you so much for asking. It turned out fine, even taking the full 3 hours to rise an inch above the pans after I flattened the dough and shaped it. Very tasty toast!
    Next I’m either going to take another try at Reinhart’s Ciabatta (mine got a bit too charred) or attempt his Baguette recipe.