Mixing method makes a cake better suited for refrigeration?

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by lotuscakestudio, May 20, 2003.

  1. lotuscakestudio

    lotuscakestudio

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    I've been wondering how to make my cake recipes not so tight and dense when they're refrigerated. I thought it would be a matter of changing the recipes, but a baker I know said it was in how I mixed it. I mix the wet ingredients then add sifted dry ingredients and whip until no lumps. He said I should start with dry and add about half of the wet and whip. Then slowly add the rest of the wet. The whole idea was to incorporate a lot of air into it. Before I waste ingredients, can anyone else vouch for this method?
     
  2. w.debord

    w.debord

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    There's different methods for different types of cakes. So it's sort of a loaded question, there isn't just one method- you didn't mention what type of cake your talking about.

    Basicly... what your asking I agree with (with alot of exceptions), yes I'd generally follow his technique over yours....but there's more to getting great results then your question asks. Tight and dense have alot to do with what fats and flours your using and if your indeed 'whipping' them to incorporate, your not going to get the best results possible.

    Incorporating air, using it as a leavener only works in butter or egg leavened cakes. You can't make a oil based cake lighter by whipping in air, it won't take.

    Also when you chill butter cakes that does change their texture, no way around that. I'd suggest you use either a chiffon or a oil based cake for instead.

    HTH
     
  3. lotuscakestudio

    lotuscakestudio

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    Been busy busy busy so I haven't had time to come back to my own thread!

    Anyhow...
    This isn't a creaming method type cake. There's no butter in it b/c it's vegan and no margarine b/c I know it will just act like butter and make the cake firm up when chilled. So yes, it is oil based. A while ago, I started adding an acid and that helped quite a bit to make things lighter. Oh well, I guess the restaurant owner is just gonna have to deal. If he doesn't shape up, I'll be cutting him off soon anyway, but that's a whole other rant....
     
  4. w.debord

    w.debord

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    Oil in cakes makes great cakes, that refridgerate well. The only cakes I've done with oil where the method is important is chiffon cakes. I just can't see how your going to whip air into oil and make it hold in a baked good. That's just against all the common sense I have.

    The only positive effect of whipping would be for some other ingredient in an oil based cake.