Misono Swedish Steel gyuto 240

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Joined Jul 24, 2017
A99BBE46-4312-491A-B07D-C296E43A80E5.jpeg This was my first Japanese knife purchase after reading so many helpful reviews on Cheftalk. My criteria was that I wanted a western style handle, carbon blade, flat profile, 240mm+ blade, budget under $150.


I never used a chefs knife over 8", but wanted to try one. This quickly eliminated MAC and Masomoto based on budget. I was also interested in the Masahiro line, but preferred the blade profile of the Misono Swedish Carbon. I'm sure there are many others in this price range and size, but I am happy with the selection.


Out of the box the knife was sharper than any I had used before. Since then I've touched it up on a 3000/8000 whetstone and will use a leather strop too. It has been an eye opening experience to use a truly sharp knife in the kitchen. The handle is comfortable and the overall fit and finish was very good. I prefer stainless handle pins and these are brass.


It is taking some learning to use the extra length blade, but this has quickly become my go to knife. My chef knife went from being never used, to me looking for things to cut up in the kitchen.


I prepare guacamole and pico de gallo often and used to dread squishing tomatoes for the dish. Now the are properly sliced and chopped. It makes easy work of carrots and even sweet potatoes.


The reviews I read did indicate the blade is highly reactive and I did notice this after a couple of uses. I used a mustard to patina the blade and it has held up well so far. Some may or may not like the designs etched in the blades, but I like it.
 
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Joined Nov 15, 2012
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I prepare guacamole and pico de gallo often and used to dread squishing tomatoes for the dish. Now the are properly sliced and chopped. It makes easy work of carrots and even sweet potatoes.

Slicing food, as opposed to crushing it, makes a difference in any dish, and some more so then others. Thin and sharp ALWAYS wins the day. Thanks for the follow up, we always appreciate hearing from those who come here for advice.
 
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Joined May 28, 2015
Hungarian Goulash using beef shin. I bought some Hungarian paprika on the internet - its a revelation, completely different from other paprika I've had and very hot! I marinated the beef in the paprika overnight.

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Then slow cooked it with caraway seeds and chicken stock. I added a little cornflour to thicken the sauce. The green peppers were cooked separately to preserve their colour.

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