Miso Question/Ideas

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10
Joined Jan 16, 2010
Iv'e been experimenting with miso paste and I've found that if you mix it with melted butter(light miso) and pour it into popcorn it has a taste like "Cheddar Chesse". I can't seem to make it not chunky and I don't want to heat it with the butter becuase it will kill the miso. How do you guys add miso to hot things and also what are you doing with your miso, light or dark??
 
294
15
Joined May 20, 2009
A Chef I used to work had as an entree a supposedly Japanese dish he called 'Nage'...

I think it was mostly tomato based (Jpnse?) with white miso and coconut cream (or not?) in which choice seafood was poached...it was really good!

If anyone recognises what I'm on a before I hit trial and error... /img/vbsmilies/smilies/redface.gif
 
6
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Joined May 18, 2012
This is what I found on wikipedia ....So I guess a nage could be made with anything as long as it served this certain purpose

Miso, tomato, and coconut milk sounds stange and delicious...sounds like a pretty creative variation...maybe he was vegan or decided to make it like that for some religious reason.

You could saute chopped onions and herbs with rice bran oil, then add the tomatoes...and maybe some sake(what kind of sake would be best used for this...Junmai daiginjo? or just the junmai...or futsu?) Whatever type of fish...maybe sole...or tuna...salmon? poach the fish then add coconut cream(and maybe a little bit of cornstarch?)

That could possibly be extremely delicious...you should try it.

nage  is a flavoured liquid used for poaching  delicate foods, typically seafood. A traditional nage is a broth flavoured with white wine, vegetables, and herbs, in which seafood is poached. The liquid is then reduced and thickened with cream and/or butter.[sup][1][/sup]
[h2][edit]Background[/h2]
Cooking something à la nage  translates as “while swimming” (French  nage) and refers to cooking in a well-flavoured court-bouillon.[sup][2][/sup]  Eventually the term "nage" itself came to refer to a broth which, while light, is strong enough to be served as a light sauce with the dish itself [sup][3][/sup], unlike a court-bouillon which is not. Ingredients such as tomatoes may be added.[sup][1][/sup]
[h2][edit][/h2]
 
843
12
Joined Oct 16, 2008
We did a Misoyaki Sable/Black Cod for years.  Miso was cooked with Sugar, Mirin and a little water until brown and cooled.  The fish was marinated in the Miso blend for 12 hours and then seared.  It was AMAZING
 
186
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Joined Feb 15, 2012
A LONG while back, bought all the fixings for Miso soup at little Asian market near me.  Only thing that cost much was the miso paste.  Made the dashi and it was SOOOOO too fishy for me!  It's my understanding (and so far proven true) that miso paste pretty much NEVER goes bad!?!  I like to put a spoonful into veggies to finish instead of salt.
 
294
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Joined May 20, 2009
Wow... posted my bit a while ago now.

As above I did the Wiki thing too. Got my own place now so have done the trial n error with this dish. 2:1 Tom pste to Miso plus lemongrass n kaffir lime leaf....

This started out as an alternative to chowder & has become a solid favourite. Now we do the chowder the same way as well...poaching prawn cutlets, calamari n mussels in the shell to order in the fish sodden base...much kinder to the seafood & so very well received.
 
32
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Joined Feb 28, 2012
This is what I found on wikipedia ....So I guess a nage could be made with anything as long as it served this certain purpose

Miso, tomato, and coconut milk sounds stange and delicious...sounds like a pretty creative variation...maybe he was vegan or decided to make it like that for some religious reason.

You could saute chopped onions and herbs with rice bran oil, then add the tomatoes...and maybe some sake(what kind of sake would be best used for this...Junmai daiginjo? or just the junmai...or futsu?) Whatever type of fish...maybe sole...or tuna...salmon? poach the fish then add coconut cream(and maybe a little bit of cornstarch?)

That could possibly be extremely delicious...you should try it.

nage  is a flavoured liquid used for poaching  delicate foods, typically seafood. A traditional nage is a broth flavoured with white wine, vegetables, and herbs, in which seafood is poached. The liquid is then reduced and thickened with cream and/or butter.[sup][1][/sup]
[h2][edit]Background[/h2]
Cooking something à la nage  translates as “while swimming” (French  nage) and refers to cooking in a well-flavoured court-bouillon.[sup][2][/sup]  Eventually the term "nage" itself came to refer to a broth which, while light, is strong enough to be served as a light sauce with the dish itself [sup][3][/sup], unlike a court-bouillon which is not. Ingredients such as tomatoes may be added.[sup][1][/sup]
[h2][edit][/h2]
Thank you for that informative post.. I was actually researching this quite a bit before I stumbled upon this thread.
 
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