Mire Poix trying to understand

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I have some dehydrated mp and was thinking of adding it to a chile meat dish hoping to enhance the flavor.

Wont the dehydrated veggies just absorb the moisture right back in? If I understand it and read it on this forum mp is made by slowly cooking the moisture  "out" of said veggies or am I missing something?

Should I use the dehydrates some other way or prep them some other way before adding to the chile?

thanks
 
477
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I might be totally off here, but I don't think a mirepoix is going to add much for chili. The aromatics have a gentle flavor that will get lost in chili.
 
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My gut reaction is to agree with you, Tyler. But, if you think about it, we use it in gumbo; and that has pretty bold flavors too.

Quetex, were it me I'd reserve the dried mp for soups and the like, where their flavors will make a contribution.
 
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My gut reaction is to agree with you, Tyler. But, if you think about it, we use it in gumbo; and that has pretty bold flavors too.
That's true. But, gumbo get it's strong flavors from a combination of a lot of less assertive flavors. Plus, we cut out the carrot and substitute green bell pepper. I think it's the carrot that's throwing me off. And chili contains so many spices, I think it might get lost. Maybe it's worth a try though.
 
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Don't want to hijak this with a discussion of the purpose and nature of aromatics. But the only difference between a mirepoix and the trinity is that the carrots bring some sweetness to the mix. Other than that they serve the same function.

My underlaying feeling is that including the dried mp in a chili won't hurt; but it likely won't contribute much either.
 
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Just out of curiousity, what do you currently do when making chili in regards to aromatics? Do you start with sweating onions or other vegetables, or add them later, or omit them altogether?
 
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The only aromatics I use in chili are onions and garlic, both of which get cooked first until they just show some color. The meat is then seared in the same pot with them, drained if necessary, and then I go on from there.

But I know lots of people who add them afterwards, just dropping them raw into the cookpot.

Personally, I see no need for celery, carrots, or peppers (that is, sweet peppers) in a chili.
 
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KY, I do the same, except I also use bell pepper and some hot peppers (usually either jalepenos, serranos, or anaheims, or combination thereof).

I'm curious what the OP does.
 
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Usually use some onions,garlic, bell pepper, and stewed tomatoes. There are a million recipes for chili so its just one of those dishes that has a lot of personal preference in it. i have a couple of books with chili recipe's and as I said there are thousands online. 

Remember that sometimes a "subtle" flavor is what can make a good dish great and thats what I was thinking with the mp.

There are long traditions of arguments about who where and when the whole chili craze started, in San Antonio its believed that the "Chili Queens" started it all on the river walk way before it was what it is today.

A really good read is " A Bowl of Red" by a guy named Frank Tolbert, co-founder of the  World Chili Championship in Terlingua Texas each year. Picked up a copy of that book in Telingua a few years ago while visiting Big Bend, pretty neat book imo, its stories too not just recipies.
 
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Remember that sometimes a "subtle" flavor is what can make a good dish great and thats what I was thinking with the mp.
By all means, give it a try and let us know how it works. I have heard of some crazy additions to chili, including coconut milk, mangos, and peaches.
 
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Mirepoix:

People making chili usually start with one sort of sofrito or another, even if that's only sweated onions and garlic.  I can kind of see the point of using mirepoix or the trinity in chili for flavor, but wouldn't want to see chunks -- not even small chunks -- of celery or carrot in the bowl; pepper or onion wouldn't be quite as bad, but they aren't selling points either.  Whatever.  That problem can be solved at the stock level, or by mincing very fine (as with a food processor).

What I can't see at all is the point of using dehydrated (?!) mirepoix.  

Origins:

It's certainly not scholarship, more of a feeling... But the relationship between a Texas style "red" and mundane, Mexican chili colorado are so close, it seems pretty clear to me that the former is just a variation of the latter.  How it moved it's way into mainstream American cuisine -- through the Chili Queens or in some other way -- is another question. 

No beans in my chili please,

BDL
 
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Oh the dehydrated stuff is just because I tried making some a while back for the chicken injection stock/broth and it just took forever the way I read it here, very slow roasting in oil till all the moisture was out. Then I was at the groceries and saw Adam's spices had a dehydrated bottle of it and thought well worth a try and I've been wanting to use it on something.

Agreed, NO BEANS in the chili!
 
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Before the argument ranges it's important that your orientation be stated.

BDL is a former competitor, for instance, and that colors his viewpoint. In competition chile only the sauce (gravy) and meat can be discerned. So, as he indicates, the sofrito should be run through a blender or food processor. That way it is assured of melting into the sauce with no lumps, bumps, or pieces. It's presence should appeal merely as flavor.

On the other hand, if you're making it for yourself, who cares what you include? If you want to bite into a piece of onion, then rough chop them. If you like beans, add 'em. If not, not. Similarly, on the circuit, chop meat will no longer make it---competitors dice their meat finely instead (which amuses me, because I've always maintained that the meat should be shredded, and came under fire for it when chop meat was the competitive standard). But if you like chop meat, or shredded meat, then that's the route to follow.

What I can't see at all is the point of using dehydrated (?!) mirepoix.  

Frankly, that was my reaction too. Just didn't want to obfuscate the issue further.
 
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I do have a confession. lol. In 2001 our team place 1st out of 93 teams with our chili, I did not add beans but I did add the bean soup just a little extra profile in there from our 1st place beans.

Profile, suble,sneaky,  whatever we call it, it worked that time. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
 
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a mire poix is the "base".  it's a subtle layer in some places and a delicious bite in others. This isn't roasted garlic or caramelized onions it does not take hours to get this flavour. it's just a boost in flavor, although a subtle one.
 
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