Mincing your own meat?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by Ockin, Jul 22, 2018.

  1. Ockin

    Ockin

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    I am looking at opening a bar and aim to serve a range of flavoured hot dogs. Initially I'll be buying sausages from a local butcher, but I've been toying with the idea of making my own sausages once we get into the swing of things.

    The food safety aspect of mincing my own meat seems quite daunting. Is there anyone here (preferably from the UK) who can give me any advice?
     
  2. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

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    Why do you worry about food safety? How do you plan to make it?
     
  3. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Making sausage is not as easy as you think. Over here we would take a class at one of the local Universities' meat science labs or something. There is a lot that goes into it besides mincing meat and stuffing it into a casing.
     
  4. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I used to make a lot of sausage and I both agree and disagree with Kuan. Making fresh sausage isn't that difficult, although it is more time consuming than you would think. From a safety standpoint I don't feel that it raises many more issues than making and serving ground beef. Fresh sausages are meant to be stored in the fridge and consumed within a relatively short time frame. Of course, you will want to source your meat from a reputable purveyor and make sure that all of your equipment is perfectly clean and well sanitized. And all sausages should be cooked to a minimum of 165°F (I believe that is approximately 74°C). Anything I wouldn't use up within a week I would freeze. I often didn't even bother with nitrites and nitrates in my fresh sausage. Dried sausages, on the other hand, require a considerable amount of specialized knowledge as the drying process subjects the meat to considerable time in the danger zone and thus there are numerous things you must do to prevent micro organism growth. If you stick with making fresh sausages and practicing proper food safety there really shouldn't be any problem.
     
  5. Ockin

    Ockin

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    According to what I've read online, and what some people have told me, if you want to use a mincer you need to have it in a separate room to your main kitchen due to meat particles. That is based on UK guidance, which is why I was wondering if anyone from the UK on here made sausages.

    It would be very beneficial to be able to make my own. I aim to have multiple flavoured sausages being sold at a time, but this would be difficult to keep on top of wastage since I would need a reasonable quantity of each flavour. Being able to store frozen chunks of meat that I could grind into sausages as I need to would be quite useful.
     
  6. sgsvirgil

    sgsvirgil

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    From a logistical aspect, making your own sausages is not as complicated as it seems. Getting the recipe right is just as important as paying attention to making sure you are following proper safety guidelines and paying strict attention to detail in terms of cleanliness and sanitation. The process is only as complicated as you want to make it.

    You have been given some excellent advice here. But, make sure you continue doing your own research, too. But, bear in mind that if you are looking for information and advice about the core premise of your business model on an internet chat forum, that's a very good indicator that you still have a long way to go. :)

    - Learn your local health codes and regulations. Know them like the back of your hand. If you have an opportunity to attend some classes on the matter, do it. Its money very well spent.

    - Know your equipment inside and out, backwards and forwards. Train your people to know the equipment just as well.

    - Make sure you develop an effective and fail safe cleaning and sanitation process for all of your equipment and work area. Train your employees on it regularly. Make sure they are not cutting any corners when it comes to cleaning and sanitizing. It only takes one small incident to shut you down permanently.

    - Like the others said, source your ingredients from a good and reputable supplier.

    - Talk to other chefs who have experience. Continue doing your research.

    - Take your time and develop an efficient and rock solid setup. The more you know, the faster you can develop that set up. Once you have all the proper logistics in place, you can start focusing on perfecting your sausage recipes.

    Good luck. :)
     
  7. Ockin

    Ockin

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    Thanks for the feedback. You're completely right that I have a long way to go. We are currently still in the very early stages, and have only just managed to get a viewing yesterday of the place we want. The kitchen there is quite small which raises many questions over how the menu would actually function.

    Looking at the place the only option if meat needed to be ground in a separate room would be to section off part of the large cellar and stick in a table along with a meat fridge, freezer and hand sink there. No place I have previously worked has ground their own meat, and I'm guessing the need for a separate room is the reason why.

    I'm basically just planning ahead for where I ultimately want to be with the business.
     
  8. sgsvirgil

    sgsvirgil

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    There's no rule that says you must start out by grinding your own meat. You could always buy it already ground and simply season it yourself and case it yourself. Once the business has some air under its wings, you can always start grinding the meat yourself.

    Good luck! :)
     
  9. Iceman

    Iceman

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    I worked in a butcher shop with a crack-head owner/boss and his miserable pissy wife. We made sausage all the time NO problemmo.
     
  10. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Not sure what iceman is implying here, but I have to admit I have always had a very cavalier attitude towards raw meat. Hasn't caused me any problems yet. Well, one thing though, I will never again make burgers from old hamburg. Actually, you couldn't pay me to use old hamburg/ground meat for anything.
     
  11. Iceman

    Iceman

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    I apologize. I was kinda going in two directions at the same time.

    We made a lot of sausage. It was an easy job. We had NO difficulties. NO ... we didn't throw the boss' wife in the mix.
     
  12. mike9

    mike9

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    Except in his OP he said "HOT DOGS" totally different process unless their nomenclature is different from ours.
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2018
  13. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    Hot dogs? Ooh, that's tricky. It's an emulsified sausage, which means you've got to be obsessive about temperature or it'll split. And it's a smoked sausage, which means more equipment. If done at home as a hobby, sure, but this is a big deal for a restaurant.
     
  14. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes, he did say "hot dogs" and those, while still sausage, have a few things different about them and the process, but when it comes to food safety I don't see them as any different from any other "fresh" sausage (although technically they are cooked-I use the term fresh as opposed to dried sausages).