Mezzaluna restoring project

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by ordo, May 29, 2014.

  1. ordo

    ordo

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    So, i decided to restore this 32 cm. old carbon steel mezzaluna i inherited, apparently made in Paris.


    Deeply chipped, almost 1 cm.


    Please don't ask me why.
     
  2. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Half moon right? All the italian I know is from learning music. It looks like a fun project. Can't wait to see the end results.
     
  3. dcarch

    dcarch

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    How about go to a welder and weld some new steel where the pit is and resharpen.

    Otherwise you will be drastically changing the curved edge. That would be "modification" and not "restoration".

    dcarch
     
  4. ordo

    ordo

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    Very difficult to weld new steel there. The proper steel, welding high temperatures that probably will destroy  the tempering, etc. I will use stones. It is, indeed, a modification, but not so radical. Here's the idea:

     
  5. benuser

    benuser

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    Excellent solution I believe. By the way, it's called a Hachoir (à) deux mains, or (Hachoir) berceuse, which is by far the most poetic name I know to be used with a knife.
     
  6. dcarch

    dcarch

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    Depends on what you will be using it for. With this kind of tool, I don't see using it for razor sharp cutting/slicing, in that case, the tempering of the edge is not that critical.

    dcarch
     
  7. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Isn't it used to chop herbs?  I would want a sharp blade for that.
     
  8. dcarch

    dcarch

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    Sharp yes. but not sushi sharp. I think you need steel that will not chip when you chop.

    dcarch
     
  9. ordo

    ordo

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    It's a chopping and circular motion, so some slicing is involved. This mezzaluna seems forged. The steel is pretty hard.
     
  10. benuser

    benuser

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    This one is not made for herbs, but for mincing meat. For herbs French cooks use the flat section of a chef's knife -- push-cutting, one hand on the bolster, one hand at the middle of the blade.
     
  11. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    @ordo  as I am not as knowledgeable in the knife world as those here, I did get the 'feeling' that your mezz would be for mincing of meats, no?
     
  12. ordo

    ordo

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    It's basically a vegetables chopper, K. Like this:

     
  13. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    I suppose I was thinking Asian cuisine, I see that often, although I myself have never tried it.

    In Asian cooking mincing your own meats is the preferred method over buying the commerically ground meats,

    too fine a mince, we like a 'chunkier' meat...

    /img/vbsmilies/smilies/licklips.gif
     
  14. benuser

    benuser

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    Think rather about some quantity of steak tartare.
     
  15. ordo

    ordo

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    I found some vintage hachoires, mezzalune, herb choppers. Click the image.

     
  16. ordo

    ordo

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    Just begun.

     
  17. jake t buds

    jake t buds

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    I assume you have at your disposal a bench top grinding wheel, lathe, and some sharpening stones? A buffing wheel?

    I'll be looking out for the finished product.

    Good luck!! 
     
  18. dcarch

    dcarch

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    The most important tool for this project indeed is a wood turning lathe.

    dcarch
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2014
  19. ordo

    ordo

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    Both of you're right, but as i do not have a lathe, i rely on a wood worker.

    I do have a drill and some grinding wheels. Stones i have enough. Also wet-dry sandpaper of different grits.

    The chipping stage's done.


    Pick of  the "edge" if i can say so.

     
  20. knifesavers

    knifesavers

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    For safety sake do all the rehandling before sharpening it.

    Since Mezzalunas don't store well maybe add a ring like a honing steel to hang it.

    Jim

    .