Metric PLEASE!

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by kuan, May 5, 2005.

  1. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Everybody, if I promise to write all my recipes in metric will you do the same? In your kitchen, in your house?

    Please? :) :D
     
  2. botanique

    botanique

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    LOL I feel your pain. Are you starting a Chelf Talk metric movement? I'll back you ;-)
     
  3. nicholas

    nicholas

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    I'm with you. Metric is definitely the way to go.
    It's a waste of time having to convert recipes from volume to metric!
    I'm glad we use metric in Singapore, hooray for that.
     
  4. frizbee

    frizbee

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    I am just stuck in old school I guess. My brain hurts when I have to think about metric, however I am wondering why the interest in changing?
    Frizbee
    -sometimes disgruntal about change....
     
  5. panini

    panini

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    WHY????
    The united Stated threatened to go metric years ago.LOL The legeslators couldn't understand it LOL
     
  6. keeperofthegood

    keeperofthegood

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    LOL

    :roll:

    I am a CANADIEN!!!!!!

    I am BI-SYSTEMATICAL :cool:


    Personally, I far prefer the use of cups and pounds over millilitres and grams.

    I know my fist is a cup, my cupped hand is a teaspoon shallow and a tablespoon deep, that two fists is a pound and that 8 eggs is a cup.

    I have no idea what 10 eggs would be, other than to many...:cry:

    Also, metric temp divisions are not clean. 350 F, 400 F, nice, clean numbers that have very predictable results that work. I have no idea the centigrade on any of that.


    Now, if I was doing chemistry or physics or electronics, its metric all the way.


    :D

    But with cooking, the most complicated electronics there is is the on switch, the most involved physics is that sudden motions cause souffles to fall, and the most complex chemistry is that to four fists of flour I add two deep handfuls of baking powder and one shallow hand of salt a fist to four fists of liquid and viola.... quick bread to corn bread to pour batter :D
     
  7. chef_bob

    chef_bob

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    I too am Canadian and use both systems. ;) I can only tell you how warm it is out side in metric (24 today! Woo hoo Summer! :D ) but I can only cook in imperial ( I think I need to calibrate my dep fryer again, which only has imperial markings on it). I drive 88 kilometers to work every day but my stairs are 4 feet wide at home. I have no idea how many kilograms I weigh :confused: (and am in denial as to how many pounds :eek: ) but I buy my deli meat in grams. So really has Canada gone metric, ya sure, and we are all bilingual, say "eh" and live in igloos! ;) I guess it is a Canadian thing to not want to offend the old system, so even though the laws have changed the people have not. :lol:
     
  8. shahar

    shahar

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    We should move to metric time -

    100 second a minute, 100 minutes an hour and 20 hours a day.
    that makes a metric second about 1/2 of current second.

    It would probably never happen, but it would simplify everything. Right now you have a system with 100(milliseconds), 60(seconds, minutes) and 12/24 (hours). for calculations you have to switch three times. ahhrrrggghhh!
     
  9. chef_bob

    chef_bob

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    Metric time! I love it!!!! Sign me up! :smiles: :lol:
     
  10. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Vernor Vinge and Charlie Stross in their fiction have used computer/metric time: kiloseconds, megaseconds, gigaseconds and so on. It's not perfectly clear if those are the binary computer multiples or the metric multiples, but it's a VERY interesting idea in light of their singularity based fiction.

    Stross is giving away his latest novel, Accelerando in an experiment. I was somewhat let down by the ending, but rather enjoyed the rest of the novel.

    Phil
     
  11. chinds85

    chinds85

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    Most of the recipes I post are far more vague aproximations of amount than the US measurement system. I would prefer metric but sometimes I simply dont measure out ingredients. Like many, I'm more inclined to skim a recipe and "wing it" rather than follow it word for word.

    Of course, that does not apply to all food I cook. :chef:
     
  12. panini

    panini

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    My son and I are just finishing up his first Jensen Healey. The only tools I take care of are the metrics. Losing the standards keeps me from doing things around the house :D
     
  13. fincher

    fincher

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    I'm an American living in Canada, so I'm having to adjust to the bi-system

    steaks cut in oz..

    small measures are imperical, teaspoon, cup etc, but anything larger goes to liters not gallons

    oven is in imperical, fridges are monitered in imperical, the heat in the kitchen in metric

    shots at the bar are in oz. but wine (of course) is metric

    if the floor drain backs up, the water is measured in inches, not centimeters

    etc.. etc.. its confusing! I'm used to only imperical, metric would be fine, but using both seems challenging
     
  14. mikeb

    mikeb

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    I only use metric unless a recipe calls for imperial. I also only measure things by weight, never by volume (more precise by weight). If a recipe calls for volume/imperial mesurements I just guess/estimate since I'm too lazy to convert. No ones noticed yet...
     
  15. shahar

    shahar

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    The one great thing about metric, one that many americans don't understand, is that with that system recipes are actually ratios. They can be instantly changed.

    Like let's say I have a recipe that give me fifty 40 gram buns. Tomorrow I need a hundred and fifty 60 gram buns. I multiply the original recipe by 3(1.5x2). In ten - twenty(if you're really slllloooowww) seconds, you get the new recipe.

    Most of my recipes, if they need precision(I don't weight tomatos for salsa), call for ratio alone:

    1 flour
    2 liquid
    0.25 egg yolks
    etc.
     
  16. panini

    panini

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    shahar
    hum :confused:
    1/2 my formulas are in metric and 1/2 in standard. I increase and decrease the same both ways.
    Are you telling me I'm more more inteligent in metric? Hey! I'm all for it, those crazy americans :p
    Please don't tell anyone, but lately I've been having these feelings. I think I may be BI-SYSTEMATICAL
     
  17. shahar

    shahar

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    Ok, try to multiplu 3# by 1/4. Increase 2 spoons by 20.
    hmmmm.....

    My recipes include eggs by weight. I can easily change a creme brulee recipe from 4 servings to 400 in seconds. No annoying counting(was that 250 yolks or 260?)
     
  18. mudbug

    mudbug

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    Well, until the US does make the switch to join the rest of the world in harmony, here is the site I use which has several extremely useful conversion calculators, I highly recommend checking it out and bookmarking it:

    http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/conversions.htm