meat grinder blade sharpening

Discussion in 'Cooking Equipment Reviews' started by millionsknives, Jul 16, 2014.

  1. millionsknives

    millionsknives

    Messages:
    2,473
    Likes Received:
    466
    Exp:
    Professional Caterer
    My grinder has gotten a lot of use and I think it's time to tune up the blades.  As I understand it, I need to flatten the blade and the disc.  What does everyone use for this?  I don't have a belt sander or anything.

    I have a diamond plate that I've been using to flatten sharpening stones.  Would that work?
     
  2. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

    Messages:
    4,333
    Likes Received:
    83
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Realize that both your blade and the plate now have contours that conform to one another.  The plate is probably dished and the knife conforms to its contour.  Therefore it'd be necessary to both sharpen the knife and to "face" the plate flat to avoid any gapping between the knife and plate.  Chop Rite, the manufacturer of manual grinders, provides that service.  They'll "face" the plate and sharpen the knife for a nominal charge.  Otherwise I'd simply get a new blade and probably new plate.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2014
  3. millionsknives

    millionsknives

    Messages:
    2,473
    Likes Received:
    466
    Exp:
    Professional Caterer
    That's what I meant by flattening.
     
  4. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

    Messages:
    4,333
    Likes Received:
    83
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    The blade I "feel" but don't know positively you could probably flatten on a flat bench stone, like an 11" x 2" bench stone from SharpeningSupplies.com.  But when it comes to plates, I hear that they're hardened, really hardened so that you'd probably need a "machine setup" to flatten it.  For advice you can either contact Sharpening Supplies or Chop Rite now known as Chop Rite Two.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2014
  5. foodpump

    foodpump

    Messages:
    4,983
    Likes Received:
    537
    Exp:
    Professional Pastry Chef
    Meh.....

    With both my 30 qt Hobart and my kitchen aid meat grinder, I do the same treatment:

    Rub the faces of the die on my 1000 grit diamond stone, then on my 4000 grit stone.  Both stones are pretty flat.  Then I rub the knife on the same stones.  The knife has a flat back on each of its "arms" or "wings" and a bevel.  I have no idea what the bevel is, but after flattening the back, I just touch the bevel up  up with a pocket diamond hone to remove any burr or nicks.
     
  6. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

    Messages:
    4,333
    Likes Received:
    83
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    For my upcoming meat grinder attachment to my Hobart N50, I plan to use anything from coarse india to soft arkansas to maintain a crisp edge at each of the exit holes.  As to the "propellor" blade or chopper (as well as the plate), always hone using a "figure 8" motion.
     
  7. millionsknives

    millionsknives

    Messages:
    2,473
    Likes Received:
    466
    Exp:
    Professional Caterer
  8. chefross

    chefross

    Messages:
    2,755
    Likes Received:
    399
    Exp:
    Former Chef
    I learned a trick from a butcher long ago.

    If you have multiple dyes with varying hole sizes, match a propeller blade for each one.

    This way each time you use them you'll only be using them for the coarseness you're grinding.

    Large, medium, and small all have their own blade.

    Works great. 15 years now, and have never had to sharpen anything.
     
  9. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

    Messages:
    4,333
    Likes Received:
    83
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Yes, use a dedicated blade for each  and every plate because the blade and plate will "wear together" and the curve or bow that the blade develops will conform to the opposing contour of its plate.  They'll be a closely matching pair.  For each plate that I own, each plate has its own blade to match.

    In other words the contour of the matching blade and plate conform to each other.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2016