Mauviel vs. Falk copper cookware

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by jackam10, Jun 22, 2010.

  1. jackam10

    jackam10

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
     As I've gotten more and more serious with my cooking I've been looking into higher quality cookware. I already have a few All-Clad French skillets that I am very pleased with but I have been looking into copper cookware.

    The two brands I've been considering are Falk and Mauviel. In you experience, which is better (and why)? Ecenomically speaking, Falk is a bit cheaper than Mauviel. But both are rather large investments so quality is the road I'm going for.

    I know that Falk puts effort into very thin stainless steel lining (0.2mm to be exact) making it a better heat conductor, but I haven't been able to find anything about how thin the stainless steel lining of Mauviel is.
     
  2. orangecook

    orangecook

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    see below
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2010
  3. orangecook

    orangecook

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Hi, I, too, am new to this, but I think I can clarify a couple of things - and if anyone know this info to be wrong, pls chime in.  My understanding is that all of the copper cookware that is laminated to stainless steel, is actually made by Falk.  Falk actually bonds the materials together, and whether this is done in Belgium, Switzerland or Germany is another matter, and if you can find that out, please let me know.  Then, that laminated copper is made into pots under the names Falk (made by Falk in Belgium), Mauviel (made by Mauviel in France), and Bourgeat (I have read also made by Mauviel in France, but this may be inaccurate - their literature says it's made in Lyon, France).  Then, you have to compare pots among the three companies that are not really comparable:  a Mauviel curved/splayed saute pan is slightly different in specs from a Falk sauciere in a similar size, which is different from a Bourgeat.  Then, too, the thicknesses are not the same.  I currently have two Mauviel curved/splayed saute pans (the ones that everyone raves about on the web) under the Mauviel professional line, but which I know are 2mm and NOT 2.5mm.  I also have a couple of other Mauviel pieces that look to be around 2.5mm, but not exactly.  I have two Falk pieces that look to be around the 2.3mm that they actually state somewhere on their site, as opposed to the 2.5mm that is also sometimes discussed.  And lastly, I have one Bourgeat piece that is by a long shot the thickest of all the pieces, and seems to be at least 2.6mm.  Whether thickness matters (thicker is better) is another issue and I don't yet have an opinion, but given that these suckers all cost untold sums of money, I'd like as thick a pot as I can get for my hundreds.

    If I could do the whole thing from the beginning again, I think I would go with Bourgeat.  For some reason it's not discussed as much, but it seems to be the thickest, and the stainless lining is perfectly smooth, rather than brushed, which is Mauviel's situation, and which doesn't 'help' with food releasing.  Falk's linings are also smooth rather than brushed.  Other important differences are a rolled lip on Falks and Bourgeats (at least on the saute pans), where Mauviel keeps the sides straight with no lip.

    Another issue that I'd like to bring up is the issue of polishing pots.  I do not understand the fixation on keeping pots polished, and it's often one of the first things brought up in these on-line copper pot comparisons, and it has nothing whatsoever to do with the function of the pots.  To me, nothing looks tackier than a shiny, polished copper pot, and given that it's a tool, why not leave them alone?  After all, it's a never-ending, futile battle anyway, and I would argue that a tarnished pot looks nice.
     
  4. duckfat

    duckfat

    Messages:
    1,354
    Likes Received:
    24
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    Mauviel makes several series of pots of different styles and different thickness. Many of their products are in fact 2.5mm thick although I think the toipic of thickness  gets way too much play for home cooks. 

    Not all Mauviel pots have straight sides. 

    Me, I can't stand a filthy pot inside or out so mine are polished but I'm not obsessive about it. A little bar keepers friend and a few minutes of light polishing has them looking new again. 

    As far as which brand is best the answer is rather simple.

    The brand that has the series you like. ;)

    All of these are top notch products.