Mauviel Tin Lined Cookware

8
10
Joined May 22, 2003
Hello Everyone-

I am new here. I've aquired a love for cooking over the last few years. And, I've discovered that I'm pretty good too. Soon I'll be getting some new cookware and have just about decided on the Mauviel Copper Tin Lined (2.5 thickness). I've been reading everything I can find. It didn't take me long to figure out that I wanted Mauviel Copper. But, I had first decided on the Stainless Steel lined. Now, I'm leaning towards the tin lined. I would love to hear your opinions. I know the basic pros and cons of each. Stainless never needs retinning. Retinning sources are becoming harder to find. I've found a couple and don't think that will be a problem. Of course, my range is gas. I don't know that I could ever go back to electric. Let me know your opinions, experiences, etc.

Thanks...

Keith
 
211
10
Joined May 18, 2001
Recheck your logic. Definitely go for the stainless steel-lined copper. The first time you have to scour the tin you'll wish you had the stainless. The stainless steel is so thin that it doesn't effect the heat transfer. For more infomation click here.
 
4,473
109
Joined Aug 4, 2000
All but one piece of my Mauviel is stainless lined. And the one tin lined piece that I have requires retinning - after using it twice to make chicharrones. Other chefs who've used tin lined wish that they'd invested in stainless lined. Be forewarned, grasshopper.
 
8
10
Joined May 22, 2003
I have rethought my logic and have decided against tin. I orginally wanted the stainless steel, but changed to tin when I noticed the difference in price at www.buycoppercookware.com

Now, I've found E. Dehillerin's website. I've never ordered from overseas. But, I'm thinking that with shipping and other fees (Whatever those are?) it will still be cheaper than ordering from any of the other websites I've found thus far.

Has anyone ordered from Dehillerin on the WWW?

Thanks,

Keith
 
211
10
Joined May 18, 2001
That's why I sent you to my web site. There's a price comparison there that includes shipping and duties. It's a little out of date because of the franc to euro change, but the concept still holds. I usually fax them rather than start the order over the internet, but the internet should work fine. They are an old reputable company.
 
8
10
Joined May 22, 2003
I have a question about ordering from Dehillerin. When I order from them, they charge my CC for everything (products, tax, shipping, duty)? Then, they ship to my door?

I accept package at my door like UPS or FedEx?

Thanks...

Keith
 
4,473
109
Joined Aug 4, 2000
Since I'm fluent in French and will probably be teaching it in the near future, I've dealt with Dehillerin over the www. Specify to them what you want and they'll email you a quote in eurodollars, the total price delivered to your door via Airborne or Fedex. At that point you'll fax them your credit card number and, most importantly, your signature with the permission for them to debit your card x eurodollars. Delivery should take place within 2-4 weeks afterwards.

Visit this site to convert eurodollars to USD:

http://www.xe.com/ucc/

Dehillerin was very pleasant to deal with.
 
211
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Joined May 18, 2001
They usually ship Emery Air Freight, unless you request a different carrier. I'd request Chronopost, the French post office, because Emery charges extra for customs clearance if they, Emery screw up, and they add a surcharge for delivering to a non-commercial address. The total charges were still relatively small with respect to the whole order, but they still shouldn't operate this way. And that was only on one of three orders I've placed to Dehillerin. It wasn't Dehillerin's fault, it was Emery's.

Chronopost delivers via US carriers such as Airborne, UPS, and FedEx. It's seems to be who Amazon.fr and alapage.com use.
 
8
10
Joined May 22, 2003
I just emailed E. Dehillerin for a quote on some cookware. I'm going to order the following from them:

9.5" saute pan w/ lid
5.5" sauce pan w/ lid
8" sauce pan w/ lid
10" frying pan

I'm sure I'll order some more eventually. But, I figure this is a good selection to start with.

Also, I read somewhere else that they have a catalog. I requested that. I'm sure they have so much more than what's online.

Until later...

Keith
 
211
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Joined May 18, 2001
Actually, their catalog is pretty skimpy compared to the vast number of items available in the store. But it's still an interesting read.
 
4,473
109
Joined Aug 4, 2000
Recently I purchased a Mauviel tin lined 5 QT hand hammered stew pot. And I was having some buyer's remorse concerning the tin lining until I read the following article. Here's what I recently found concerning the use of tin lined copper cookware!!!!! My motto: FEEL NO GUILT.

https://www.buycoppercookware.com/mauviel-cookware-faqs



Why is Mauviel copper cookware lined with tin?
Copper must be lined since it reacts to acidic foods and without a lining the copper may discolor your food or impart a bitter taste. Mauviel tells us that the French chefs prefer tin linings because food is not as prone to sticking to tin and is a better conductor of heat. It is necessary to use wood or non-metallic utensils due to the softness of the tin. The tin linings should be cleaned with soap and water and Copperbrill cleaner should be used keep the copper shiny and new. If food is baked on, it should be soaked in warm soapy water until it becomes soft. Never use cleansers, steel wool or Scotch-Brite. If the cleaner can scratch, do not use it.

Cooking with tin lined copper requires lower heat settings due to its superior heat conductivity. You can use these pieces in your oven, but not above 450 degrees. Tin melts at 460 degrees, so please be careful. Overheating the tin will not wreck the pan but the lining may bubble and form small puddles. It is safe to use the pan as long as the copper is not showing thru regardless of overheating the tin. To avoid having this happen again your old flame settings will have to be revised. We suggest half the flame you are used to if you have been using aluminum, even less if you use steel, and much less if you cook with cast iron.

In time, tin will wear out and you will see through to the copper. At this time, you will have to send your pan to a retinner where it can be retinned and made to look new again. The folks at Rocky Mountain Tinning provide this service. Tin lined copper is substantially less costly than stainless steel lined, which helps defray the eventual expense.

The linings of the tin will last for many years if you treat them with respect. How many years depend on the amount of use and the care and cleaning method. It is best to let the pan soak in warm soapy water until food particles are dislodged about 30 minutes will usually due the trick and then you can wash with a soapy sponge before drying.
 
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286
106
Joined Sep 21, 2010
I have rethought my logic and have decided against tin. I orginally wanted the stainless steel, but changed to tin when I noticed the difference in price at www.buycoppercookware.com

Now, I've found E. Dehillerin's website. I've never ordered from overseas. But, I'm thinking that with shipping and other fees (Whatever those are?) it will still be cheaper than ordering from any of the other websites I've found thus far.

Has anyone ordered from Dehillerin on the WWW?

Thanks,

Keith
Yes, my husband ordered a set of Pommes Anna and Tarte Tatin cookware as a gift for me from Dehillerin's. They came all the way to Vancouver, BC in a massive and very heavy box - well worth it! I think he phoned the store directly, he speaks French and they were delighted to help him.
 
4,473
109
Joined Aug 4, 2000
Yes, my husband ordered a set of Pommes Anna and Tarte Tatin cookware as a gift for me from Dehillerin's. They came all the way to Vancouver, BC in a massive and very heavy box - well worth it! I think he phoned the store directly, he speaks French and they were delighted to help him.
I just emailed E. Dehillerin for a quote on some cookware. I'm going to order the following from them:

9.5" saute pan w/ lid
5.5" sauce pan w/ lid
8" sauce pan w/ lid
10" frying pan

I'm sure I'll order some more eventually. But, I figure this is a good selection to start with.

Also, I read somewhere else that they have a catalog. I requested that. I'm sure they have so much more than what's online.

Until later...

Keith
Back in the early 2000s I faxed my order to E. Dehillerin along with CC and signature. The item arrived in a timely manner and was lower priced than here in the U.S..

I don't know if E. Dehillerin still offers a paper catalog but please let me know. 8))
 
286
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Joined Sep 21, 2010
Here's the tarte tatin pan (middle and shiny!) and 3 sizes of pommes anna pans on the sides. I used these a lot for pommes anna and other things.
Ironically, I just moved to a condo, and I'm looking at an induction oven. At least I can still use these in the oven and my Breville mini.
IMG_4389.jpg
 
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