Mauviel and Bourgeat Copper Cleaning

4,462
105
Joined Aug 4, 2000
Has anyone tried cleaning (polishing) their copperware using citric acid? I heard that it works. For the time being I use Blue Magic to polish my copper using lots of elbow grease. That's the reason women call me El Beau! Copperbrill from France is very 'spensive but I am hearing citric acid aka espresso machine cleaner will do the trick, aka CAFFEZA:


Urnex Cafiza Espresso Machine Cleaning Powder

 
Last edited:
2,182
653
Joined Oct 31, 2012
Barkeeper's Friend is a good copper cleaner. Bon Ami also. I've never heard of Blue Magic but you don't need expensive cleaners from anywhere. If I really screw up the pan, a very fine steel wool works, esp on the outside bottom. SOS pads do a good job too. I've never used citric acid for copper cleaning but I have some somewhere in the pantry. I'll have to find it and try it out.
 
3,989
825
Joined Dec 18, 2010
Lemon (citric acid) and salt is effective. Just like when prepare copper bowl to make a meringue.
 
1,259
797
Joined Mar 1, 2017
If you use citric acid such as lemon juice etc, heat it up first. It works better. Heat the pan too by bathing it in hot water.

But, barkeeper's friend is the best, IMO. Polishing my Mauviel copper with Barkeeper's Friend involves only slightly more effort than just simply washing the pans. It removes the black buildup on the bottom of the pan, too. :)
 
4,462
105
Joined Aug 4, 2000
If you use citric acid such as lemon juice etc, heat it up first. It works better. Heat the pan too by bathing it in hot water.

But, barkeeper's friend is the best, IMO. Polishing my Mauviel copper with Barkeeper's Friend involves only slightly more effort than just simply washing the pans. It removes the black buildup on the bottom of the pan, too. :)
BF imho is too abrasive on the copper itself. First, I'll try using citric acid. But I like what you state concerning the "black buildup" on the bottom of the pan.
 
5,508
946
Joined Oct 10, 2005
Cleaning the oxidization from copper ware is easy, as apprentices we made a paste of salt, vinegar, and flour— the flour is only there to make it a paste, this works very quickly and easy.

THAT SAID.... when you are cooking, you have oily fumes, sauces, liquids, and burnt on oil that covers the oxidized copper, so the salt/ vinegar potion won’t work until the burnt on crud is removed, needless to say this is the hard part that requires elbow grease.
 
1,259
797
Joined Mar 1, 2017
BF imho is too abrasive on the copper itself. First, I'll try using citric acid. But I like what you state concerning the "black buildup" on the bottom of the pan.
BF isn't abrasive at all. All you need is a soft sponge and some hot water. Easy peasy. :)

Here's some examples. Total time spent polishing this pot was less than 7 minutes, including the time it took to take pictures. ;-)

Here are the "before" pictures.

Pot and Lid Before.jpg
Pot Bottom Before.jpg
And here are the "after" pictures.

Bottom After.jpg

Lid After.jpg

Pot and Lid After.jpg
 
3,989
825
Joined Dec 18, 2010
What are you rubbing in the bkf with? As others have noted, it isnt abrasive at all, main active ingredient is oxalic acid.
I don’t mean to be rude in a contradiction, but the first ingredient listed on their website for both the original and the cookware cleaner products is “mineral abrasive”.

https://www.barkeepersfriend.com/

From personal use over the years, the abrasive is extremely fine in texture. I use the original for cleaning stainless interior of clad cookware and notice a gray remainder on the cleaning cloth each time... even when the pot is already clean.


For copper, though, I’ve cleaned quite successfully but never to the sheen of the original polish. I assume that would require a rouge and power tools. Not worth it for working cookware. Maybe for display cookware but then only if also lacquered.
 
171
72
Joined Jan 9, 2019
I personally would never use BF on any shiny copper, it's fine for copper candy pots or internal use.
If you want to maintain an external mirror finish, Brasso!
A lot of elbow grease, would not use it in the interior of cooking pots, if you do, wash well just before use.
A polish with Brasso will last for months- or years- if you don't burn sulfur candles!
Wear rubber gloves, shake can well, apply a dash to a paper towel(s) & rub the copper surface well, it may take some time to remove all the oxidation.. then remove/polish/finish with old terry towel cloth (all will be blackened, hence the gloves).
I'd suggest to do this all on newsprint/covered counter.
G'Luck! :cool: copper fondue pot.jpg
 
Last edited:
1,259
797
Joined Mar 1, 2017
If BKF is scratching your copper, please post picture proof and a brief description of how it was used, including any details about what was applied to the copper i.e. sponge, paper tower, cloth etc.

If used correctly, BKF will not scratch your copper. :)
 
171
72
Joined Jan 9, 2019
Grabbed a new copper sheet & tried both Brasso & BF.
"I" prefer the mirror finish with Brasso.
As a kid, if we used anything but Brasso on our brass instruments, we'd have our a**es kicked halfway to the moon.
BF DOES clean it up, but certainly not a mirror finish.
I guess it's all about who's got the most marketing/advertising $$

Brasso vs BF.jpg
 
Top Bottom