Mauby concentrate

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by suzanne, Apr 1, 2002.

  1. suzanne

    suzanne

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    I bought a bottle of "Mauby Concentrate" since the Jamaican restaurant across the street from my house closed. I mixed it up according to the measures on the label (1 part concentrate to 3 parts water -- actually, seltzer). It came out much more bitter that I expected. :( Is that what I should have expected? VERY bitter-sweet?
     
  2. shawtycat

    shawtycat

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    You probably used too much mauby concentrate :) Too much will make it bitter. Making mauby is kinda like making unsweetened Iced Tea. Which is the taste you are looking for. Thats all you really need to know.
     
  3. marmalady

    marmalady

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    You guys want to share with the rest of us what exactly IS Mauby Concentrate?!!!!
     
  4. shawtycat

    shawtycat

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    Mauby is dried the bark of the Caribbean Carob Tree (Colubrina Reclinata), a native tree to the region.

    To prepare boil (on a low heat) the tea bag in 2 pints of water for about an hour. Leave overnight to soak. Remove the tea bag and dissolve about 1 cup of sugar in the liquid (add more water if necessary). Dilute to taste (1:3 parts of water recommended) and serve over ice.

    That's basically what Mauby is. It tastes a bit like unsweetened Iced Tea although using too much of the concentrate can make the drink quite bitter. Concentrate is used when Mauby bark is unavailable. The ratio is based on whoever made this mauby recipe. We usually go by our taste only, never the ratio.

    Id add a picture if I could figure out how. :blush: So here is a link to one instead. Matouk's Mauby Concentrate
     
  5. shawtycat

    shawtycat

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    Suzanne,

    I just noticed that you said seltzer in your post. Raised a few West Indian eyebrows in my house, including grandma's. We have never heard of adding seltzer. She wants to know what that tastes like.

    Jodi
     
  6. suzanne

    suzanne

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    It tasted like Mauby with bubbles, that's all (seltzer is just carbonated water, after all). When I make Sorrel* drink, I add all sorts of other spices -- I admit to being a shamelessly cross-cultural cook. Like tonight: we're having posole (a soupy stew with hominy, chicken, and pork) but I don't have any Mexican cheese to garnish the tostadas, so I'll use feta. Please don't shoot me, Athenaeus! It's just so much fun to play with things ... :D I would never, ever claim that what I cook at home is "authentic" -- except for authentic Suzanne.

    Thanks for your help -- it was MUCH better with more water. And now the bottle of concentrate will last longer;)

    Sorry, marmalady! I'll try not to do that again. *Sorrel is made from dried hibiscus or rosella flower sepals; you soak them with spices in boiling water, mix in sugar, and get a lovely red beverage (even lovelier if you add rum!).
     
  7. riverrun

    riverrun

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    I've never heard of mauby is there any medicinal reason it's drank or is it just for quencing thirst?
     
  8. shawtycat

    shawtycat

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    I dont know....yet but my grandma always said that it "cleanses the blood" so Ill have to find out and get back to you. Funny that Im learning more about my own food just by doing research to answer these questions. :lol: Thanks guys.
     
  9. shawtycat

    shawtycat

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    Riverrun

    Mauby does quench the thirst and it is listed in the Medicinal Plant directory. Although many west indians believe that it lowers cholesterol and help regulate you kidneys, I will leave that up to you to decide since I have not found any research regarding that belief.

    If I do find anything I will let you know.

    Jodi
     
  10. riverrun

    riverrun

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    Thanks jodi i appreciate u answering me if u have any Questions just e-mail me at [email protected] and i will answer them the best i know how thatnk u again.:chef: :chef:
     
  11. suzanne

    suzanne

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    Okay, so it's only in the 80s today? Instead of the high 90s. But a very small slug of the maube concentrate in a big glass of cold water is very, very refreshing. Much less than the recommended amount. But you still have to like bitter flavors! There's a neat anise-y, slightly medicinal fragrance to the drink, a hint of sweetness, and a lot of bitterness. It's really helping to keep my mouth moist from salivating.

    Jodi, I hope you're doing okay in this heat. Momoreg, too, in case you read this.
     
  12. shawtycat

    shawtycat

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    No Mauby here in Jersey that I can find :( I asked my mom to bring some with her when she comes to visit. Ive been drinking another favorite ......Lemonade. :) I couldn't go out in this heat since Ive been prone to fainting if I get too hot lately.
     
  13. momoreg

    momoreg

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    I just saw Mauby in the supermarket the other day... I may buy a bottle, out of curiosity...

    The heat was pretty intense--I think I like this weather better. The tulips outside are probably a bit happier now too!