MarkV-Tomato Help Needed

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by kerryclan, May 26, 2005.

  1. kerryclan

    kerryclan

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    Mark, you may want to help this tomato hating writer out with an explanation of the differences between vine ripened vs. "regular" tomatoes. He is trying to explain the cost difference.

    http://slate.com/id/2119406/
     
  2. dano1

    dano1

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    Odd...phallic references wrt tomatoes. Bet he doesn't eat zuccini either.
     
  3. kerryclan

    kerryclan

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    He's obviously and odd guy. Never tasted tomatoes or beer, beer. This is very suspicious! And the phallic reference is out of place and a bit of a stretch. :eek:
     
  4. redace1960

    redace1960

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    has the moron never heard of upmarketing or percieved value? geeze. this seems pretty elementary to me.
    anyone who has never eaten a tomato is a PHILISTINE and a commie and probably hates dogs, too. his entire problem is a lack of tomatoes and beer in the diet.
     
  5. jock

    jock

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    OK, I'm not clear if the original question was genuine or whether it comes under the heading of "DUH!"

    Assuming it was for real, in the first place the article refers to the tomatoes being marketed as "tomatoes on the vine" and that is a bit redundant. If he really means "vine ripened" then there is a huge difference.

    "Regular" tomatoes are picked green when they are tasteless and this prolongs their shelf life. They are sprayed with a gas called ethylene that turns the skins red but it is still a tasteless green tomato.

    Vine ripened tomatoes are ripened (as the name suggest) on the vine where they develop the color from naturaly produced ethylene and are allowed to develop flavor too. The reason they cost more is because they taste better and they have a much shorter shelf life.

    I dunno, I get the feeling I am stating what is broadly common knowledge. Like I said, I don't know if Kerryclan's original questionm was real or rhetoric.

    Jock
     
  6. kerryclan

    kerryclan

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    Jock, I referred this article to MarkV because he wrote the tomato piece featured on this site. I thought he would get a laugh and then maybe give the writer an education as the author asked for in the article.

    What you said in your post is exactly the information this guy needs. Obviously, it is not common knowledge to non-foodies.
     
  7. markv

    markv

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    Jock beat me to the punch. His answer is exactly correct.

    But I must add that this guy is a couple tacos short of a combo meal. What a kook!

    As for the phallic reference, me thinks he might be a phallus-cranium. :crazy:

    Mark
     
  8. kerryclan

    kerryclan

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    Thanks, Mark. Yes, the author of that article must be a real what you said!

    Jock - after re-reading these posts, I fear you thought that I was asking the question about tomatoes! Bwah! No, not me. There's a link to an article from Slate.com in my original post. The weird author is asking the question. :p
     
  9. jock

    jock

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    Nah, I knew it wasn't you asking :)

    Jock
     
  10. keeperofthegood

    keeperofthegood

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    Heeeeyyyy I like green tomatos :) and I don't find them flavourless. I will grow and pick my tomatos green for green chutneys and chow chow and salsa verde. I also like pickled green tomatos too, and stuffed green tomatos, and the list goes on. The only way I like red tomatos is in between two slices of toasted white bread........... :)

    As to store tomatos, as I understand from my dad on this, the seed developers worked towards tomatos with longer maturation times, thicker skins, and firmer flesh. Not towards taste.