Marinating steak for two days

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I started marinating some steak on Saturday. I put it in beer soy garlic powder and salt. I was planning on cooking it that night so it’s just in bowl mostly covered with the liquid. But some of the steak is exposed to the open air... is this steak still good to be cooked and enjoyed today?
 
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So long as you had put it in the fridge it will be completely fine. if anything the favour today should be amazing compared to the day of.
 

phatch

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As far as you had placed it in the fridge it will be totally fine. But I don't think that which steak in the open air is not good to be cooked.if it was more then 4 hours in open air then you should avoid to cook it.That will good for your health. :)

Do you have any idea about wet aging vs dry aging, the time, temp and conditions? Because your comment is baseless. The exposed piece might have dried out and be unpleasant for that. Unhealthy, not so much.
 
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Bit of a tangent here, but how on earth have we (as a species) fallen so far out of knowledge of basic food storing and cooking that people no longer know that a 2 day old refrigerated steak is safe to eat? More than 4 hours in open air? In the fridge? How would that not be safe to eat?

Has basic sight/smell/touch skills left almost everyone on the planet?

Our ancestors must have eaten so many things that would turn all our stomachs...and yet we are here. 2 day old steak, sheesh.
 
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Agreed, if it looks and smells ok, especially in the fridge, it IS ok.
Trust in the logic here.
Sumbmerge the portion poking up, in the marinade for 15 or 20 mins or more,
cook it up and youll never know the difference.
 
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Bit of a tangent here, but how on earth have we (as a species) fallen so far out of knowledge of basic food storing and cooking that people no longer know that a 2 day old refrigerated steak is safe to eat? More than 4 hours in open air? In the fridge? How would that not be safe to eat?

Has basic sight/smell/touch skills left almost everyone on the planet?

Our ancestors must have eaten so many things that would turn all our stomachs...and yet we are here. 2 day old steak, sheesh.
youd be surprised alot of kids these days prolly couldn't tell you where vegetables came from. let alone if meats of good quality or not short of it being green
 

pete

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There's no logic there, and I don't trust that, no.

View attachment 64438

I don't fully agree with that infographic you just posted. The answer lies somewhere inbetween. "Use by" dates are put on products to help protect companies often. I have drunk milk past its "use by" date. I've eaten eggs well beyond their "use by" date. I've eaten cheeses that had been removed from their original wrapping and rewrapped long after what many companies consider to be past it's "use by" date. The last company I worked for said that any cheese, once opened had to be disposed of within 14 days, even if it was rewrapped.
 
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Thank you Pete. Theres a long post in here i made a few months ago on my opinion
of use by dates, why theyre there and of those who go by them.
To briefify, they dont mean a lot to me, because no one can predict post
purchase, or dven pre purchase handling conditions.
The see it smell it common sense approach has worked for me for over 40 years,
and ive seen way too much perfectly good product get dumped because of some
date stamped on some container.
And theres enough waste in this country already
 
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The idea is that what causes food poisoning typically isn't detectable by human eye or nose. I've had very bad food poisoning twice in my life and the food didn't have anything noticeable in terms of sight or smell. I've tempted the fate and ate stuff that didn't look or smell 100% right in my life and didn't get sick from it. So I agree with the infographic on this.

I agree that you can eat many things past their due date. Most canned foods, yoghurts, etc....

I agree that you can mishandle things and get sick from them even when consuming prior to their due date.

The idea of a due date is that it more or less guarantees that if you handle your food properly and eat it before the due date then you shouldn't get sick.
 

pete

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My point is neither the "if smells good and tastes good" and the "follow the use by dates" guidelines, by themselves are inadequate. You have to use your judgement and no hard and fast rule can cover all contingencies. The answer lies in a combination of the two. For example, in the past I have had issues with cartons of milk going sour way before the "use by" dates. We did everything right but somewhere something went wrong, either with the manufacturing process or when in the purveyors hands. In this case the "use by" date was no help at all. And again, I am speaking about food at home. In a professional setting, I usually err on the side of caution and follow "use by" dates except in some instances.
 
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My point is neither the "if smells good and tastes good" and the "follow the use by dates" guidelines, by themselves are inadequate.
Right. My main point was that "if it smells good and tastes good" is inadequate. Not so much that "follow the use by date" is adequate.
 
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Wish I had saved the ad. A while back saw someone peddle what they referred to as "Million Year Old" sea salt. Salt. OLD salt. And it had an expiration date.

mjb.
 
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Ha ha! Love that.

In a previous life I worked in a lab, and we had copper pellets for a standard. They had an expiration date. It was a rule that everything had to have one; so the manufacturer put the max allowed time on the bottle, and when that date rolled around we had to toss them.
 
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As to the OP, with the cooked by now (I hope) steak. I would have noted that the texture may have changed. Many years ago in a fit of unwarranted optimism we thought we would be eating Thanksgiving dinner on Thanksgiving, ha ha ha! We put a small turkey in brine the night before, and then smoked it - several brine changes and three days later. The taste was fine, but the texture was exactly that of lunch meat. Bleh.

I'm honestly not sure why we didn't just rinse and let it dry after the 1st day. We've learned a lot since then, this year we had chili dogs.
 
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Since I was heavy on the like button I 's'pose I should comment.
Like Pete I have had milk sour before the date...more than once.
Eggs showing signs of being old as well.
Anyone for stale crackers opened the same day of purchase or moldy bread selected straight from the rack being used to restock (by the vendor)?
These problems are only getting more frequent as time passes.
I suspect some $$ ticket items (esp the products stocked by manufacturers) are being re-boxed and redated.
Some others are not being handled properly during transport (bought a quart of ice cream and found all the add ins had fallen to bottom of carton...had melted at some point) and it seems no one cares at point of purchase.... they tell me to complain to manufacturer customer service.

Getting old (pun intended) .

mimi
 
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Sorry did not address the original question.
As long as you washed your hands before handling the meat and marinade and your fridge temp is reliable there are no worries.
2 days is considered safe when brining.
Salt/saline is a preservative.

mimi
 
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