Marinated, broiled lamb shoulder steak - good idea?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by french fries, Dec 22, 2010.

  1. french fries

    french fries

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    I bought a lamb shoulder steak. Never cooked this before. I seasoned it with Salt and Pepper, dried oregano, cumin, dijon mustard, lemon juice and crushed garlic. I'm just thinking I may add a bit of olive oil now.

    My plan is to put it on a tray under the broiler. Is that a good idea? Anyone tried that before?

    I would put it on the grill, but it's pissing outside right now, and I'd rather try my new oven. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/licklips.gif
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2010
  2. french fries

    french fries

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    Well it was ok, nothing fantastic. Main problem is after 3 mn of broiling on each side, while I'd achieved a great browning, I thought there was no way it was cooked inside (thick steak). So I let it bake for another 10mn or so at 300F. Big mistake. It was still pink, but not rare enough to my taste.
     
  3. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

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    FF, I'd be tempted to slice it very thin acrosss the grain, then into your marinade, and cook it quickly in a hot wok/frypan.  Takes very little time to cook as long as you keep tossing or flipping the pieces around it should come out tender.  I even beat mine up with a meat mallet before marination.  Drain it, dust it a little with cornflour which adds to the browning and getting a nice crust.  Serve it up immediately with some steamed rice and veg of your choice.

    Of course, it won't be red inside.  If you really want that I would go for a griddle pan on quite hot, just a couple of mins each side, let rest for few mins, then enjoy!  What may be inhibiting the pinkness on the inside could be the addition of lemon juice to the marinade as it will start cooking the meat, depending how long you leave it soaking.  If you can in the future, leave it overnight without the lemon juice, then serve it up with a quarter of lemon to sprinkle.  I add some soy right at the end of cooking to give it a boost when cooking it like this.  Not too long before it's done or you'll smoke the house out /img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif

    Hope this helps.
     
  4. french fries

    french fries

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    Thanks DC! That's an interesting idea... but yeah I was really going for the opposite here. In fact I was reminiscing of a great whole grilled lamb shoulder someone cooked for me recently, only trying to replicate that with a smaller cut. But yes, definitely, I like it red inside, not just pink.

    I only "marinated" the steak for about 1 hr and I only squeezed a few drops of lemon juice so I don't think it had time to go through to the inside of the meat? I suppose it's really the broiling was much more intense than I would have imagined. I have used electrical broilers to finish gratins or add color to something, but never to cook a piece of meat, and this broiler I have is a powerful beast. I'll have to adjust and learn.

    But thanks for the comments! Always appreciated.

    I think if I do this again, I'll follow your advice - but still maybe with the broiler (which allows me to lather the steak with mustard, which would make a mess in a frying pan). If it's a thick piece like the one I had (about 2 inches?) 3 mn on each side, let it rest 6-7mn and enjoy. That should do the trick.
     
  5. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    You've got it now, FF. Given the way you prefer it, finishing in the oven was your misake.

    With 1" thickness, two minutes on each side results in meat that's red inside. So I'd guess another minute on each side for your 2" steak would be perfect.
     
  6. french fries

    french fries

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    Thanks KYH. Gotta get used to this new broiler. I had no idea it would cook things so fast.
     
  7. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    FF, I mostly cook things in the oven first, only using the thermostat set at 180°C or something. This will cook your dish to perfection, but with no or very little crust. When I want a nicer crust, I give it a last minute boost under the broiler. This doesn't apply for meat only, ovendishes topped with bechamel + cheese like lasagna, moussaka etc. benefit from this kind of method too.

    Broilers are too strong to cook meat properly as you experienced. You will always end up with a nice crust on an underdone piece of meat or gratin.
     
  8. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    It also depends on the meat as well.  I've had good success cooking lollilop lamb chops under the broiler.  But still, I prefer small chops and steaks to be seared.
     
  9. french fries

    french fries

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    So your technique (oven first, broiler last) is very close to my technique (broiler first, oven last). What I like with my technique is that I can control the amount of browning, then use the touch test to test for doneness and make a decision on how long I have to use the oven to finish it. Although obviously, in this case, I kinda failed! I mean it was still good, but a bit overdone.

    A lot of the high end steak houses around here cook steaks under very high heat broilers, so that's something I'm getting curious about.