Mangere/Mangaire?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by coulis-o, Jan 24, 2010.

  1. coulis-o

    coulis-o

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    the chef at work asked me for Mangere/Mangaire (sp?) pronounced 'marnj-air', then asked if i spoke french

    i said i dont know what mangere is because im english not french, although i know many other french cooking terms

    then one of the chefs said that mangere was french for 'mixed vegetables', i later tried to look this up on the internet but found nothing related to that term. all i found was that the most common french word for vegetables is Legumes, not mangere.

    anyone here familiar with this term?
     
  2. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Chefs are never wrong -- at least not during working hours. It must have been your hearing. What he said was jardeniere de legumes, which is (more or less) synonymous with assortis de legumes. He might also have said, macedoine. If chef said it, you're mistaken and not him.

    Chef or not, in the future if someone who is not French asks you if you speak French, the correct answers is "J'regrette beaucoup, j'suis tres desole, I assure you. Mais un petit peu de Franglaise only." Make a little pinching gesture when you say the word petit. Then ask very innocently, "Do you?" Just get the words out with worrying too much about accent. This goes double if you or the asker has any sort of English accent, as Englishmen, no matter how fluent in another language, are exepected to impose their own voicing. It's a holdover from the days of empire.

    Your other co-worker is pretending to be mixed up by manger, which is part of garde manger. Rest assured he is a gentle jokester and not total idiot pretending to know what he doesn't.

    As a noun, "manger" means food. AFAIK (and I'm not really fluent in French), there's no other word which could possibly be pronounced marn-jair, not even by brummy.

    BDL
     
  3. coulis-o

    coulis-o

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    my hearing is fine and would have known what macedoine or legumes is. plus it wasn't the head chef who said it it was one of his subordinates who doesn't even speak french. i guess maybe he was being vague in asking for 'manger' and the other chef knew specifically what he meant
     
  4. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    It seems my sense of humor and yours run on very different tracks. Sorry.

    To be straightforward and blunt, except in the sense that "manger" means "food," it does not mean "assorted vegetables." Your co-worker, whatever his position, is both pretentious and a fool.

    BDL
     
  5. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Coulis,

    I think you are looking for the word "Mélange" (not Malange) it means "mix" ( like mix of vegetables)

    "Manger" is the verb to "eat". A chef would ask for a " Mélange de légumes ".

    Chef BDL,

    Your French is pretty good....
     
  6. coulis-o

    coulis-o

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    thanks petals
     
  7. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Coulis,

    Ca me fait plaisir.
     
  8. french fries

    french fries

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    "Mangere" doesn't mean anything in French.
    "Manger" means to eat.

    It's only back in the 10th century that "Manger" was a noun. Back then, it meant Food, or more precisely (if you can catch the nuance), Stuff that we eat or even Meal. From there comes "Garde Manger": The place where food is kept.
     
  9. french fries

    french fries

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    Proper French would be "Mon plaisir". Kinda like the english My pleasure. Or if you want to be fancy, "Tout mon plaisir". Or if you just want to show off: "Mais c'est tout mon plaisir!" :lol: Note that "ça me fait plaisir" is perfectly good French, it's just not what you'd reply to Thank you.

    But honestly all that sounds a bit too fancy. In general, we just say "De rien" (literally from nothing).

    French is such an interesting (and complex) language. I have a Sicilian brother in law who was raised in Marseilles, south of France. There, he picked up an expression which you say when someone offers you more food at the end of a meal. The expression is "Bien vrai". It goes something like this:

    - You want some more?
    - Bien vrai.

    What he means is No. But what he's really saying is literally Good true - meaning It's the honest truth. So in fact, it's as if he's skipping ahead in the conversation. There's a whole missing part to that conversation, and it goes something like this:

    - You want some more?
    - No.
    - You sure?
    - Bien vrai (honest truth).

    The first time I heard that expression I thought it didn't make any sense! Now I understand. Imagine if someone would reply Do you want some more with Honnest truth. Funny huh?

    ---- on more story - last one I promise.

    One day in Turkey, the Turk bus-company employee walks through the bus to ask (with a very strong Turkish accent) where everybody is going, and to sell them their fare. When he asks a couple where they're going, the couple looks with a blank stare and answers: "Whaaaat?" - The Turk, a bit irritated, asks: "Do you guys speak English?" - to which the couple replies, almost in unison: "But....we....ARE English!"
     
  10. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

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    This all reminds me of a Christmas Carol....

    "Away in a manger..."

    Sorry, that's pretty pathetic :D

    Going by the info above, maybe chef was hungry and wanted something to eat?

    P.S. FrenchFries - great stories, keep them coming
     
  11. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Coulis,

    It is not polite to correct someone but I have to say There is no" Proper French".

    I enjoyed your post, just saw it now. I was brought up French and schooled in French. As far as I am concerned there are too many exceptions to almost every verb.

    What I said to you is something that is said ALL the time here in Montreal and among family and friends but more so where I work. Alot of French terms and expressions differ from France and Canada.
    We come from two different backgrounds, but in the end Coulis, over here in Montreal, that reply IS heard after "Thank you".
    I am glad we can agree to disagree if that is what we were doing, .....I hope you have a great day .....You have me laughing before I go into work . :thumb: enjoy your post.
     
  12. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Sorry Coulis, I meant my post for French Fries..... :lol:
     
  13. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Zut alors!

    BDL
     
  14. french fries

    french fries

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    My apologies petalsandcoco, and I should have first checked your "location" before replying. I didn't mean any offense, I simply assumed French wasn't your first language and went on to correct you - I didn't realize it wasn't polite. Sorry if I appeared rude to you!

    And you are definitely right that the French from Quebec and the French from France are different. I meant to give everybody the French-from-France meanings, which is what I called "proper French".

    I have never been to Quebec. I'm sure if I went and started to use my "proper French", a lot of Québécoises and Québécois would laugh real hard. :lol:

    Milles excuses petalsandcoco!
     
  15. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    A True Blue Gentleman you are.....but I understood and there was no offense taken, my day started off laughing ...I have learned to be like a "duck"..... rolls off my back

    Anytime you come to Montreal with your family, I will show you JUST how bad the language really is, "sacrebleu" and show you around. :lol::lol::thumb:

    .....Milles excuses .....non, Milles Feuilles....:smiles:
     
  16. french fries

    french fries

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    Just the other day I spoke with a Québécois who was visiting L.A. - it was so funny (to me) how he could speak English without an accent (at least to me), but when he spoke French he had such a THICK accent (obviously to me). I love the Québécois accent. To me, it just sounds really jovial and friendly.
     
  17. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Chef Petals,

    Why not send him a Celine Dion album, call it even, and be done with it?

    BDL
     
  18. french fries

    french fries

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    I'll... huh... pass on the Celine Dion album. :look:
     
  19. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    The wages of sin are penance. Celine Dion is serious stuff, but considering the magnitude of the act, it (she) is the least you can do.

    Her version of "Oh Canada," alone, reduces purgatory time by millenia.

    BDL
     
  20. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    Tell your chefs the word is middle French and it's' Melange' which means to mix or mixed. The word they gave you , can't be found because it was not spelled correctly. And it does not only apply to vegetables. ( Chef.Garde Mange' This chef is guardian of the food) Most people think this is the guy who does all the food decorations it isn't.:roll: