Making beef stock in a pressure cooker. Have any experience to share?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by chrisbelgium, Sep 28, 2013.

  1. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    A good year ago, I bought a not to big Fissler pressure cooker (4,5 liters). I know you can make a nice stock in it, so I had to try.

    I used a large beef shank, a few aromates and around 1,5 liter of water. Two and a half hours later, I put the heat out and let the cooker cool. The result was a cooked shank that fell apart when touched in some sort of stringy beef rillettes and maybe 0,5 liter of delicious beef stock that even went somewhat gelatinous when cooled. Just what I needed as a home-cook for making a few sauces.

    Maybe others do this more often. Have any tricks or do/don't from your own experience? Maybe using other meat too?


    I have to disappoint people who make ossobuco from beef shank. It's in no way an equal taste to using veal shanks, but it's still nice enough to make something out of it. I made this pasta dish; braised leeks finished in a little cream, cooked beef shank meat, pasta, parmesan. Put under the oven grill to gratin.

     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2013
  2. ordo

    ordo

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    Looks good. So we must asume you didn't browned the meat as usual? 
     
  3. mikelm

    mikelm

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    I've used a pressure cooker for years to make stocks.  (I got the recipe from my mother-in-law!) 

    First a 3-qt model and then a 10-qt one as I got more into cooking.  After you set it up, you need not pay attention, except to take it off the heat after 30 minutes. Let it cool, run it through a colander, and put the stock in the freezer.   Probably not as nuanced as the professional kitchen's forever-simmering stockpot, but it's done the job for me. 

    I don't need to clarify it, since I'm not trying to impress customers; I've had my wife snowed for years.  Or maybe she's got me snowed by her effusive appreciation since I now do a lot of the cooking.. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/redface.gif

    Mike
     
  4. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    @ordo; oh yes, I forgot, I gave the meat a nice sear first, thought it would give a better color. But what I always forget when making stock, and this time was no exception, is to "burn" a halved onion before adding it. Seems to give the best color, much more than searing the meat.

    @Mike; could you specify somewhat more what ingredients you use; meat? bones? Can one use veal bones only? You must have a lot more stock left in your cooker if you cook it for 30 minutes, which should be enough for most meats. The shank that I used seems to have taken the 2,5 hour cooking quite well, but I had just a little concentrated stock left, I was counting on a lot more.
     
  5. dcarch

    dcarch

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    Try this:

    In a pressure cooker, put a smaller pot in it. Put the (1 lb) beef in the smaller pot and NO WATER. Water in the pressure cooker, but not in the smaller pot.

    Pressure cook the beef for about 45 minutes.

    You will get a cup of absolutely pure gold the best ever beef stock.

    After that, use the same beef, make you normal stock with water and other ingredients.

    dcarch
     
  6. dcarch

    dcarch

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    BTW, bones have no flavor, marrow and meat give stock flavor.

    I did a test, I scraped off all meat and marrow from a lot of pork/beef bones and pressure cooked for a long time. The stock came out tasted just a little better than pure H2O.

    dcarch
     
  7. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    That's an interesting technique, dcarch, thanks for sharing this. Something I have to try out too.

    Incredible experience you had using bones, I was going to ask if veal bones would work for a better stock, but I assume the answer is already given.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2013
  8. siamesecats

    siamesecats

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    Chris, you can get an even better color on your broth (if you want darker) by adding a small amount of baking soda (maybe 1/4 tsp, perhaps a little bit more, depending on the volume) - it increases the alkalinity, which speeds up the Maillard reaction, and browns everything better.  I use this technique for all sorts of things, caramelizing vegetables, "roasting" garlic in the pressure cooker, I can even darken canned chicken broth so it looks like roasted chicken broth, add herbs and spices to make gravy, etc.
     
  9. maryb

    maryb

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    I disagree, roasted bone stock is very flavorful.
     
  10. french fries

    french fries

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    In my experience, making 100% beef stock can result in an overwhelming flavor that's not very attractive for a stock. Great for certain dishes like an onion soup, where the stock is the star, but you end up with a stock that's got such a "character" that it can be difficult to incorporate it in some recipes. 

    100% veal stock is luxurious (and crazy expensive to make) but results in a much more subtle flavor. 

    I like to mix a bit of both, veal gives me the subtlety and the luxurious mouth feel, beef gives a little "kick" or "boost" to the flavor.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2013
  11. dcarch

    dcarch

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    Yes, the flavor is very strong. Kind of like using beef bouillon cubes. Not to be used as the same as regular beef stock for your recipes.

    I go one step further.

    Rather than concentrating stock by boiling  it down, I sometimes  use a high vacuum pump to concentrate the stock under very low temperature. There are some flavor components which can be boiled away under high heat. Whatever you can smell in you house while boiling is what is no longer in the stock.

    I call the above my stock options. :)

    dcarch
     
  12. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Using baking soda in stock is completely new to me SC. To be tried out!

    As a garlic lover, I'm very intrigued by your garlic treatment in a pressure cooker. Could you please give a bit more info on that?
     
  13. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Oh yes, you're very right, veal stock is so much different than a "bold" beef stock. Thanks for the suggestion of making onion soup with it, probably one of the best ways to use beef stock for.

    A mix of veal and beef stock makes a lot of sense FF, thanks for that idea!
     
  14. french fries

    french fries

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    Oh there's another great way to use 100% beef stock: Vietnamese PHO!  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/licklips.gif
     
     
  15. mikelm

    mikelm

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    Chris -   I'll get that recipe tomorrow.  My beef bones are well-roasted in a hot oven and I usually get a nice color.

    SC -  could you tell us a little more about your garlic "roasting" in the pressure cooker? Always looking for more ways to do garlic!

    Thanks

    Mike