Making a perfect burger !!!

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by pera uzinica, Jun 7, 2016.

  1. pera uzinica

    pera uzinica

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    So, i need some advices how to make a perfect burger, including advices what parts of cow should i use, what would be the percentage of fat? Should I put spices before or in time of grilling burgers ? What would be profitable way of making it? Should i put something else, except salt and pepper?  How long burgers can stay fresh ? First time working as a main cook, so i dont want to disappoint, my burgers must be yummy!!!! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/chef.gif  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/peace.gif
     
  2. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    What kind of place are you cooking at - restaurant or home?
     
  3. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    But in general: 80/20 Chuck, double ground, no spices, salt & pepper as they grill. If holding raw more than a day, freezing is a good thing to do. After cooking, eat or toss.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2016
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  4. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    In most cases around the USA a good quality burger will come from the Chuck or shoulder section of the cow. This section is good because it has a lot of fat. The chuck section would offer you a good flavored hamburger in most all cases. The most universal mix is 80/20 meaning 80% meat to 20% fat. This will give you a good flavor burgers.  If your looking for a Bistro burger or high end restaurant burger you will be looking at a combination of cuts that will give you in most cases a good beefy flavor. Most of the better quality burgers are served rare to med rare to give  a more quality beefy taste. I like a 1/4lb dbl bacon cheese flame broiled burger. I also like it to be more of a drive-in style apposed to a $20 bistro style. Most of the seasoning is either a season salt or just S&P. Some places offer a mayo ketchup type sauce on the burger. Everyone wants to make their burger the best in town, some are, some aren't. Burgers are really an individual taste, what one person thinks is wonderful another person thinks is awful. ......Welcome to Cheftalk...........Chef Bill
     
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  5. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I prefer a 75/25 lean to fat ratio for my burgers.  Makes them juicier and more flavorful, IMHO.  I usually keep my seasoning simple, salt and pepper, or the Turkish Seasoning from Penzey's spices which has become my "go-to" grill seasoning.

    There are numerous threads here, on Chef Talk, just over the last year, about making the best burgers.  Do a quick search and you will have more information than you know what to do with!!! 
     
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  6. cdbrown

    cdbrown

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    I like to season mine right before I cook them. I cook them at home on an iron skillet for crispy brown edges with a juicy center.
     
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  7. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    Bill, I just stumbled onto these buns, pretty good, give them a try.

     
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  8. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    I will thanks! I always have a hard time finding rolls that hold up to a burger and a lot of rolls have no taste. I like the sourdough touch.
     
  9. pera uzinica

    pera uzinica

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    I will give it a try with a chuck part and 20 % fat, i find that solution from many answers. Thank you for advice , it is a small restaurant on the beach by the way.
     
  10. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    I like over 25% fat.   More fat more flavor.   And it gives you a bigger margin of error on cooking.   Overcook a fatty burger and it is still juicy.  Overcook a lean one and it is terrible
     
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  11. berndy

    berndy

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    30 % fat is the  best  an outstanding burger
     
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  12. iceman

    iceman

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    WOW. Some of you are really fat-lovers. It's 85-15 for me. 
     
  13. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Guilty!  Sausage I'd go 30% so I figure burgers should be a little less.  

    The most important thing is balance. The whole thing has to come together as a dish. Maybe the difference between how much fat people like in their grind depends on the toppings too.  If you're slapping on mayo or an aioli, bacon, lots of cheese, maybe you don't need all the fat in the burger itself.   Rich on rich on rich is too much.   I don't want so much stuff on my burger but I try to balance it out with some greens, something spicyish like raw onion, and an acid to cut through the richness.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2016
  14. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Great tips everyone, I've always had a hard time making a good burger at home, there's lots to keep in mind.
     
  15. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    No offense Iceman, but 85/15 is way too lean for my tastes, especially if buying my meat ground instead of grinding myself.  If I buy pre-ground meat I usually cook them to just below well done and when cooked that far they can use the extra moisture.  But even in my house ground burgers, which I cook to MR I like the extra fat.  As Millionknives pointed out, it's probably because of the toppings I use which are pretty sharp and don't provide any added fattiness.  I'm a simple guy and like the traditional toppings; ketchup, mustard, dill pickle, and raw onion-no cheese, no bacon, none of those fancy toppings.  Not that I'll turn down burgers like that, but if left to my own devices that is usually how I roll.
     
  16. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    I guess my other comment about fat content is match it to the cooking method.  If you grill a lot will drip out and burn so higher fat content is okay.  If you skillet or griddle it will pool and be greasy, so you can go leaner.  

    Grass fed can be lean and have good flavor but got to keep it to mid rare or it dries out.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2016
  17. iceman

    iceman

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    Hey look ... I take no offense. Your explanation is it. I've always believed in having it your way for you. I buy my ground beef at high-quality places. I know how tricky it gets when using third-world purveyors. LOL. On top of that, My burgers are always cooked juicy ... no matter what stage I take them too. That well-done temp can get real tricky too for some of you guys.






    OK ... before anyone goes off ... I've just been squeezing shoes here a bit. You all may remember back a few times that I've said ... "Whoever is paying gets to order it their way." (no matter how pukey that might be). 85-15 is my choice for ground beef for whatever. It's got the right amount of fat for flavor and not enough that I have to take any out. Now on the other hand ... 93-7 can be tricky too. Only just a tiny little bit for Me ... but still ... but still tricky for regular guys.
     
  18. mike9

    mike9

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    I made these tonight - 80% top round, 20% bacon, cooked in a skillet (weather) with caramelized onion, dill pickle, American cheese on a toasted onion pocket with mustard and ketchup.  Absolutely delicious -

     
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  19. brett freeman

    brett freeman

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    Matty Matheson on youtube is a funny chef personality that I follow, he has a fantastic video called "the perfect cheeseburger" or something. I made his burger with a few adjustments:

    1) I use pretzel buns :D

    2) I made a horseradish mayo 

    3) I add bacon

    Side note: You'll need to watch the video a couple times probably.. also, the content is adult oriented (choice of words etc)

    Anyway hope you find it well!
     
  20. luis de vence

    luis de vence

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    Once you get your lean and fat ratios you should also take into account the seasoning you want to add. Salting the beef prior to grilling it can suck out moisture. I read an article I believe was on the Foodlab about salting the beef and letting it rest for an hour or so. The salty beefy moisture that gets extracted has no where else to go but back inside the beef. Something to ponder about the next time we make a burger.
    Some appeal the salt and peppering right before grilling method as well.

    Subtle spices can play a huge role on your beef as well. I find that allspice or jamaican pepper plays incredibly well with beef, as well as some paprika or a roasted chili powder. Cumin also hits the spot but a real subtle amount.
     
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