Maintenance of Sakai Takayuki

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by gab english, Mar 7, 2016.

  1. gab english

    gab english

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    I've bought a Sakai Takayuki 33 layered damascus 210mm and I simply love it!



    I was wondering how to properly maintain my knife sharp and in good condition. I've bought this aluminum oxide stone to sharpen it.
    Is it a good idea? Should I sharpen it regularly on a metal hone or a ceramic hone? I'm confused by all the different information you can get on the web.

    Thank you !
     
  2. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Aluminum oxide stone is kind of rough, haven't used one for a long time. Rods are not necessary and you can damage your edge.

    Vg10 is tricky to de burrr, read one of the many threads on that.
     
  3. foody518

    foody518

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    Millions, I think a lot of synthetics use Aluminum Oxide as the main abrasive agent. 

    Stones and rods do different things. With usage over time, the metal that composes of the edge and immediately behind it gets fatigued and can slightly bend/microchip off. Sharpen using stones to re-establish or touch up an existing bevel and remove the fatigued steel, revealing fresh metal at the edge.

    Hones can somewhat re-align a fatiguing or slightly rolled edge but keep in mind this isn't a total maintenance type solution. It's still unclear to me what they do for steels that tend to chip and abrade more easily than bend.

    Hones can also add in some scuff/teeth to your edge to keep it going between sharpenings. Depending on your usage and preferences you may or may not like the slightly toothy feel.
     
  4. rick alan

    rick alan

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    I think Millions was referring to a sintered stone, also known as an India.  The picture shows what appears to be a generic 1K/3K waterstone.  Fine if you're ok with that finish.
     
  5. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Yeah let us know exactly what stone you bought there and we can tell you more about how to use it.  

    I was thinking it was one of these:

    "The Aluminum Oxide oil stones are a very popular man made choice. The most popular are called India Stone which are made by Norton. These stones can cut fast, and can also produce a fine edge on tools and knives. The grading system for these stones is generally labeled fine, medium, and coarse. These stones are often brown or orange in color. When compared with the Arkansas stones, Aluminum Oxide (India Stones) are more coarse. The India Stones are used in conjunction with Arkansas Stones to cover all levels of coarseness."
     
  6. bonesetter

    bonesetter

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    I have the same (well, slightly smaller) knife and although it's VG10 it is very easy to sharpen. So far in its 3 months with me I've licked it a couple of times on the 6K. Plenty sharp enough

    Nice knife
     
  7. rick alan

    rick alan

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    VG-10 is still soft and "bendable" in a relative sense, and it does respond to realigning.  Though a very hard and high carbide content steel like SRS-15 will microchip or experience carbide dropout rather than see any significant bending.

    But even with V-10 it is still better to strop on a fine grit rather than steel/realign.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2016
  8. bonesetter

    bonesetter

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    Also remember the uneven primary, and edge bevel (70/30 ish)

     
    rick alan likes this.