Main course after bruschetta starter

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Joined Sep 14, 2015
Hi guys,

My wife and I have just invited a couple of friends for dinner tomorrow night, as a chance for me to show off my newly acquired skills (and chef jacket).

I've made bruschetta for my wife several times during the summer and she loved it, so that's a given and I'll serve it as starter (although I consider it more suitable for hot summer nights than for a rainy autumn evening).

Now I'm wonderring what to serve as main course. I don't feel pasta or anything 'flowery' should follow a bread-based starter, but not sure about mixing the cuisins either and serving soemthing like duck breast with plums or a shepherd's pie.

I'm thinking sea-food paella but still not sure, so any ideas are welcome.

Thanks!

P.S. I'm new ro the forum and I tried the search option before creating the thread, so please go easy on me if I'm breaking any rules or best practices here.
 
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Joined Apr 3, 2008
A bruschetta is only summery if you put summery ingredients on it. But as long as you stay away from tomatoes you'll be fine. At this time of year I would top the bruschetta with wilted greens or sautéed mushrooms, it doesn't get more autumnal than that. Italians live and eat seasonally so yea I'd stay away from raw tomato which seems to be the only way Americans serve it, shame really.

In my opinion you don't have to stay Italian for the rest of the night, think seasonally, it's the best time of year for food. How many courses will you be serving? Cassoulet would be great, or any braised dish like beef bourgognion served with mashed potatoes, or osso buco served with polenta or chicken cacciatore served with pasta or goulash served with egg noodles. Or roasted pork belly with sweet potatoes. Don't forget a colorful salad too with raddichio and arugula and maybe some roasted carrots with cumin. Gosh I'm hungry now.
 
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Joined May 27, 2013
A bruschetta is only summery if you put summery ingredients on it. But as long as you stay away from tomatoes you'll be fine. At this time of year I would top the bruschetta with wilted greens or sautéed mushrooms, it doesn't get more autumnal than that. Italians live and eat seasonally so yea I'd stay away from raw tomato which seems to be the only way Americans serve it, shame really.

In my opinion you don't have to stay Italian for the rest of the night, think seasonally, it's the best time of year for food. How many courses will you be serving? Cassoulet would be great, or any braised dish like beef bourgognion served with mashed potatoes, or osso buco served with polenta or chicken cacciatore served with pasta or goulash served with egg noodles. Or roasted pork belly with sweet potatoes. Don't forget a colorful salad too with raddichio and arugula and maybe some roasted carrots with cumin. Gosh I'm hungry now.
Now I'm hungry, even though I was never a fan of osso buco. 

Anyway, it's been a late season for tomatoes at my farmers market and I got a whole bag full for roasting last saturday. They even had heirlooms. A frost came through this week so I don't expect any today. 
 

cerise

Banned
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Joined Jul 5, 2013
Hi guys,

My wife and I have just invited a couple of friends for dinner tomorrow night, as a chance for me to show off my newly acquired skills (and chef jacket).

I've made bruschetta for my wife several times during the summer and she loved it, so that's a given and I'll serve it as starter (although I consider it more suitable for hot summer nights than for a rainy autumn evening).

Now I'm wonderring what to serve as main course. I don't feel pasta or anything 'flowery' should follow a bread-based starter, but not sure about mixing the cuisins either and serving soemthing like duck breast with plums or a shepherd's pie.

I'm thinking sea-food paella but still not sure, so any ideas are welcome.

Thanks!

P.S. I'm new ro the forum and I tried the search option before creating the thread, so please go easy on me if I'm breaking any rules or best practices here.

Re bruschetta, what ingredients and/or toppings are you using? Bread is a heavy starter. Might be best as part of an Antipasto, or a take-along dish, or served with soup and salad, ministronè, Caesar etc,

Unclear re pasta is flowery. Did you mean floury?

I would focus on the main dish and build the menu around same.
 
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14
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Joined Sep 14, 2015
@Cerise: floury,  yes, I feel like such an idiot now :)

@Koukouvagia: Great ideas, thanks! I'll have to expand my skills a bit to be able to make some of the stuff you proposed, though :)

So, what actually happened:

First I decided to go with paella, but yesterday morning my wife told me that one of the guests was allergic to seafood. Finally, I did steaks with thyme served with fresh asparagus and parmesan cheese. Steaks I knew I could do well so it was kind of a safe bet, and asparagus was a great success since neither one of the guests actually tried it before.

All in all, this was my first time cooking for somebody other than myself or my wife or daughter and it went quite well. Still a lot to learn, obviously.
 
3,238
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Joined May 5, 2010
I'm always amazed when people try fresh vegetables for the first time.

To us (cooks), these are everyday items that we always use. 
 
7,675
842
Joined Apr 3, 2008
I'm always amazed when people try fresh vegetables for the first time.
To us (cooks), these are everyday items that we always use. 
I'm amazed too but I shouldn't be. Hubby has never liked vegetables until just recently. I've always served them and forced a few on his plate which he ate dutifully but indifferently. He's recently taken a serious interest in his health and has suddenly awoken to the true beauty of vegetables. It makes dinner time so much more pleasant for me.

And then there are the people who only eat vegetables one way. It's kinda sad. I can't imagine having a dinner party where none of the guests have ever eaten asparagus, a very typical non exotic veg.
 
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Joined Apr 24, 2011
Bruschetta versus Crostini ?

I make alot of different toppings for toasted or grilled rustic bread as a starter or even a heavy snack; a great way to introduce vegetables.

Howsabout:

A schmear of Goat cheese topped with sauteed rapini with loads of garlic and red pepper flakes

A thin slice of Fontina cheese with roasted sweet peppers in beautiful olive oil

Homemade Green olive tapanade
 

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