MAC Pro MBK-85 8.5" versus MTH-80 8"

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by jacobrb02, Jul 20, 2014.

  1. jacobrb02

    jacobrb02

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    So I got in over my head the other day when I picked up an Akifusa cladded steel santoku without ever having sufficiently developed my knife skills or ability to properly maintain a Japanese knife.  I micro-chipped the blade within a couple of weeks (took it in for re-sharpening) and wonder now if I even have the angle correct when honing it (ceramic rod) between uses.  Bottom line, I want to take a step back with a "simpler" knife and start from scratch.  I'm also going to pick up a gyuto just because it's more versatile and because developing skills with that knife will serve me better in the long run.

    I've been reading over a ton of threads and it looks like the top recommendations for a first time stainless monosteel gyuto in a reasonable price range are the MAC Pro series, Masamoto VG, and Hatorri FH. I think I'll get the most out of the MAC Pro, at least for the time being -- it seems like it might be the best "trainer" knife of the bunch, being a bit stiffer, easier to sharpen, not particularly prone to chipping, and having just a bit more weight and heft that will be a bit more forgiving of "amateur" technique.

    I've read BDL in particular recommending this knife for rookies.  What are people's thoughts on the MBK-85 8.5" versus the MTH-80 8"?  Looking at these knives, it's clear that the differences aren't only the length and granton edge on the MTH-80 -- they actually have what looks like completely different profiles.  Any reason to pick one or the other?  Ultimately, my goal is to learn better cutting technique and knife care, including sharpening.

    Thanks!
     
  2. rick alan

    rick alan

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    The MTH may have slightly more belly curve.  It is intended to ease sharpening as it takes slightly more care to maintain a completely flat belly edge such as found on Sabatier and vintage style German Chef, and Japanese Gyuto knives.  Since it will neither rock-chop or push-cut well I don't think it a great compromise for anyone bordering on a moderately serious+ kitchen knife user.

    Rick
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2014
  3. dsplayname

    dsplayname

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    If I were looking for something in that price range, that will be beginner-friendly, I'd buy a Tojiro DP or two.    They are cheap, effective, and cool enough to not be an embarrassment at work.

      That being said, I'll get back to the question asked.   Grantons are, in my experience, about 95% novelty and only get in the way when it comes to cleaning and maintenance.  Also, it looks like a weird profile and handle angle that might get uncomfortable on the wrist.  I've never tried either; just going off of photos.   I've had my eye on the BSC-85 for some time, but haven't found one to fondle in person before buying.