Looking to buy high quality knives for prep work, need advice

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Joined May 20, 2018
So, being frank, i'm new to this game. I've spent my last few years doing a job that has absolutely nothing to do with cooking, but decided to make the switch and loving ever second of it.

That being said, i know nothing of good knives or what an appropriate set would be like, i ended up just buying a set from Costco for personal use that had decent reviews due to it not being my profession at the time (this was about 5 years ago). Now that I've finally moved into the cooking industry, i'm attempting to start out right.

While i don't mind the German style knives, i tend to lean towards wanting to use Japanese style knives as i think the flatter profile of the edge might be more to my liking and chopping habits, that being said, i haven't used them before.

My daily work consists mainly of Veg prep with some side work (cutting lettuce, chopping parsley, slicing bread for croutons, cutting Turkey breasts for portioning and similar tasks)

Price tag wise I'm not looking to skimp, but id like to keep the total at $500 or less if possible to start. I don't want to get stupid and buy a kitchen full of knives when I'm simply doing prep work, but id like to start out right and add when i get the ability to.

Any advice on Brands/manufacturers and what type of knives you think would be useful for this type of work would be greatly appreciated along with any additional tips you might have.
 
2,865
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Joined Nov 15, 2012
If in the States you could also look at JKI stainless series, significantly less money than Misono 440, probably on par in every other way.

In both cases I think you will want to round the choil and spine near the handle with sandpaper.
 
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2,486
492
Joined Oct 9, 2008
Knives: my only question is why 240 chef's? I'd have thought it best to go 270 for a professional kitchen. Maybe I'm wrong?

On the whetstones, I thought the current state of knowledge was that the Chosera stones are really too hard for kitchen knives. For learning to sharpen, I'd recommend the King Combi 800/3000 instead, as it's cheap, gives great feedback, and can be carried around easily. If you want to spend a lot more later on, the Naniwa Super line are much softer than the Chosera.
 
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Joined Oct 9, 2008
I wouldn't know what makes the Choseras too hard for kitchen knives, and am looking forward to hearing the line of thoughts that leaded to that conclusion. They are relatively fast and give a great tactile feedback.
Ok, so a number of hardcore sharpeners say that kitchen knives get better polish and edge from soft stones. Naniwa makes things like the Chosera line for woodworking tools, especially chisels, and soft lines like the Supers for knives. Remember that speed has nothing to do with hardness, or anyway not much.

As to precisely why soft is better for kitchen knives, I'm hoping someone like Jon Broida (@jbroida ) will chime in to explain, because I've never entirely understood this myself. I do know it's pretty commonly accepted wisdom in Japan, so it's not just a couple people's pet theory, but again, I can't really explain with any claim to accuracy.
 
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Joined Mar 6, 2014
So, being frank, i'm new to this game. I've spent my last few years doing a job that has absolutely nothing to do with cooking, but decided to make the switch and loving ever second of it.

That being said, i know nothing of good knives or what an appropriate set would be like, i ended up just buying a set from Costco for personal use that had decent reviews due to it not being my profession at the time (this was about 5 years ago). Now that I've finally moved into the cooking industry, i'm attempting to start out right.

While i don't mind the German style knives, i tend to lean towards wanting to use Japanese style knives as i think the flatter profile of the edge might be more to my liking and chopping habits, that being said, i haven't used them before.

My daily work consists mainly of Veg prep with some side work (cutting lettuce, chopping parsley, slicing bread for croutons, cutting Turkey breasts for portioning and similar tasks)

Price tag wise I'm not looking to skimp, but id like to keep the total at $500 or less if possible to start. I don't want to get stupid and buy a kitchen full of knives when I'm simply doing prep work, but id like to start out right and add when i get the ability to.

Any advice on Brands/manufacturers and what type of knives you think would be useful for this type of work would be greatly appreciated along with any additional tips you might have.[/QUOTE
Don't buy new. For $500 and a bit of work I could have a 15 piece set carbon and stainless
 
28
17
Joined Mar 6, 2014
So, being frank, i'm new to this game. I've spent my last few years doing a job that has absolutely nothing to do with cooking, but decided to make the switch and loving ever second of it.

That being said, i know nothing of good knives or what an appropriate set would be like, i ended up just buying a set from Costco for personal use that had decent reviews due to it not being my profession at the time (this was about 5 years ago). Now that I've finally moved into the cooking industry, i'm attempting to start out right.

While i don't mind the German style knives, i tend to lean towards wanting to use Japanese style knives as i think the flatter profile of the edge might be more to my liking and chopping habits, that being said, i haven't used them before.

My daily work consists mainly of Veg prep with some side work (cutting lettuce, chopping parsley, slicing bread for croutons, cutting Turkey breasts for portioning and similar tasks)

Price tag wise I'm not looking to skimp, but id like to keep the total at $500 or less if possible to start. I don't want to get stupid and buy a kitchen full of knives when I'm simply doing prep work, but id like to start out right and add when i get the ability to.

Any advice on Brands/manufacturers and what type of knives you think would be useful for this type of work would be greatly appreciated along with any additional tips you might have.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Sabatier-V...70.l1313.TR5.TRC1.A0.H0.Xsabatier+carbon.TRS0 Just bought this beautiful 11" carbon sabatier from one of the best makers. Bargain this one is mine
 
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Joined Apr 24, 2018
Ok, so a number of hardcore sharpeners say that kitchen knives get better polish and edge from soft stones. Naniwa makes things like the Chosera line for woodworking tools, especially chisels, and soft lines like the Supers for knives. Remember that speed has nothing to do with hardness, or anyway not much.

As to precisely why soft is better for kitchen knives, I'm hoping someone like Jon Broida (@jbroida ) will chime in to explain, because I've never entirely understood this myself. I do know it's pretty commonly accepted wisdom in Japan, so it's not just a couple people's pet theory, but again, I can't really explain with any claim to accuracy.

Just speaking from experience I started out with the King 1000/6000 combo stone. I found the 1000 side dished quickly and the 6000 provided little to no feedback. I upgraded to 2 separate stones, the Chosera 800 and the Chosera 3000. Both provide excellent feedback, cut very quickly with no noticeable dishing. I have used them on a Aogami Super gyuto (HRC 65) and a Mac Pro gyuto (HRC 57). In my admittedly limited experience they are outstanding stones for Japanese steel kitchen knives.
 

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