Looking for translation help

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Joined Mar 6, 2001
I'd like to make a recipe from Herme's book and I'm stuck on an ingredient. He calls it : sifted "brisures" de succes.

Can anyone tell me what that is, please?
 
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Joined Jul 31, 2000
I am not exactly sure how it translates but I make a "Fond de succes" with whipped egg whites and a little almond flour and sugar and bake it very slowly. I learned this from Andre Soltner as he used to layer his frozen raspberry souffle with it at Lutece.

Brisures i think means chip or crack? I don't know if this helps but it's all I can come up with
 

isa

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Joined Apr 4, 2000
AS CC mentionned, Brisures is the French term for chips as in chocolate chips, brisures de chocolat. It can also means bits and pieces of something.

From what you said I take it he wants you to make a fond de succes and brake it into little pieces. Does he mention anything about the size of the brisures?

Just to make sure my translation is acurate, give me a bit more text from the recipe...
 
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BRISER means to break up into pieces such as PATE BRISE (forgive the absent accents - don't know how to apply them)

BRISURE would mean the object (or perhaps process) of breaking; as someone mentioned, chips or flakes.
 
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Joined Mar 6, 2001
Here's the way the recipe reads:

Hazelnut Meringue Succes


250 g powdered hazelnut
250 g confectioners sugar
80 g sifted "brisures" de Succes

mix together.

500 g egg whites
500 g sugar

Beat the whites with a small amount of sugar. Add the remaining sugar when they become stiff. Spread in spiral with a number 16 nozzle. Bake at 150c with open draught for a minimum of 45 minutes.



This meringue recipe above gets layered with a praline cream with crushed homemade praline. Then wrapped in a sheet of milk chocolate. That's the entire recipe.

So the question is... while I'm making this meringue (the recipe posted) I add sifted broken pieces of what? Succes, but putting boken peices from a meingue into another meringue is weird...no reason to do so ??? I think it's broken pieces of something else....could it be as simple as pieces of hazelnuts????
 
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Joined Jul 23, 2002
direct translation
"brisures" de Succes
break of success

could it be an old brand name for meringue powder?
jon
 
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Joined Feb 21, 2001
I was gonna butt in here yesterday but it looked like the answer was there if only between the lines. I think it means just that..putting in broken and sifted pieces of meringue. It's going to add flavor and texture.
 
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Joined Jan 15, 2001
Wendy, I have seen a recipe like that somewhere but my brain isn't working properly without coffee. Maybe the recipe is geared towards bakeries where they always have extra "brisures" de Succes laying around. I agree with bighat--the addition is for extra flavor/texture and for not wasting scraps(?). It is possible to make a hazelnut succes without using the brisures.
 
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wendy
In english it means "cracks" of succes" i know this doesnt help but thats what it means .. try this site for translation in the futer


pat http://translation.langenberg.com/
 
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Thank you everyone! I'll book mark that site pmj, every now and then my french books throw me.
 
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Bummer, when I clicked on your source pmj it didn't work. Would you enter that again, please?
 
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I guess i did something wrong ? Copy the link and when you get the "the page cannot be displayed" page...paste the link and hit enter and it works

pat
 

isa

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Joined Apr 4, 2000
No it's not hazelnuts Wensy if it was so he would have said noisettes. I do wonder why put those two words in French when everyhting else is in English??


Maybe he wants the brisures to add texture to the meringue....
 
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There's lots of crazy examples like that in the most expensive professional pastry books. Sentences that make no sense, words used incorrectly, etc....

Whom ever they use to edit their work, English can't be their first language!
 

isa

3,236
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Joined Apr 4, 2000
You should see the errors in the English book written by French chefs...
 

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