Looking for old fashion chocolate frosting that hardens

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by barbara6711, Sep 12, 2011.

  1. maureen m

    maureen m

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    HERSEY’S FUDGE FROSTING
    This is the recipe that was on the back of the can as long as I can remember. My daddy wanted a chocolate cake every week, and I’ve made this recipe so many times that I remember the recipe without looking. This frosting will get hard and crack sometimes. This is the one that, also makes fudge.

    3 cups sugar
    2/3 cup cocoa
    dash of salt (1/8 tsp.)
    ¼ cup of butter, melted
    1 – ½ cups of milk (Whole milk is best choice)
    1 tsp. pure vanilla extract

    Mix dry ingredients thoroughly in a heavy-bottomed pan such as a cast iron skillet.
    Add milk and bring pan to a simmer, add butter. Bring to a rolling boil (a boil that can’t be stirred down). Reduce heat to medium low, maintaining a boil and stirring constantly. Boil at this rate for one minute. (This should produce a hard-ball candy stage where a drop of the liquid dropped in cold water forms a ball as it falls to the bottom.)

    Remove from heat and stir in vanilla. Set aside to cool and stir often, finishing by beating with a hand mixer until spreading consistancy is reached. This takes a bit of time, but worth it. *If you’re in a hurry, set the pan in a larger pan with ice cubes to speed the cooling. Quickly assemble the cake. If the frosting becomes too hard, place the pan in a container with a couple of inches of hot water in it to make the frosting soft again.
     
  2. lareine gretzky

    lareine gretzky

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    Fast fudge frosting from better homes & gardens 1971

    1 lb confectioner's sugar sifted ~ 4-3/4 cups
    1/2 cup cocoa
    1/3 cup boiling water (I sometimes need a 1/2 cup depending on humidity)
    1/3 cup butter or margarine softened
    1 tsp vanilla

    Combine everything but the water and butter with a fork. Add the softened butter or margarine, using the fork break it up so it will melt easier. Slowly add boiling water. The water must be boiling. The consistency of the frosting should be smooth and pourable. But not runny. Think a little thinner than peanut butter. When you lift a fork out of the frosting you should have frosting on the fork which you can watch ooze back into the bowl. The beauty of this frosting is if it's a little too thick ad a little more water a tablespoon at a time, if it's too thin at a little conf. Sugar. Do not use a mixer!! When you're ready pour 1/2 the frosting on the top of your cake and gently nudge it over the sides adding more frosting where you need it,
     
  3. stephaniee

    stephaniee

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    I am trying to get a hard icing or frosting.  I made this old fashion yellow cake and i wanted the chocolate frosting like my grannie made.  I got the cake down and boy is it moist.  But the frosting/icing...

    I'm doing something wrong and I'm trying to remember what grannie used.  I melt a stick of butter with 1 cup sugar and 1/2 cup cocoa.  I know it's milk next but the amount I must be getting wrong.  I boil the mixture up to 9 min. while stirring but it's not forming a ball when put a drop in water to test it. 

    After 10 min. of boiling this I go ahead and add vanilla then stir it some more before pouring it over my cake.  It never gets hard.

    If someone could explain what I've done wrong, I'd appreciate it.

    Thanks!
     
  4. krhcbh

    krhcbh

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    This is the recipe I use
    3/4 cup Hershey's cocoa
    1 stick butter (not margarine and I use salted some say unsalted)
    3 cups sugar
    1 1/2 cup whole milk
    1/2 teaspoon vanilla

    I put all ingredients in except vanilla and start stirring. As soon as the chocolate begins to boil put a timer on one minute. Pull it off heat add vanilla and stir then start pouring. Make sure not to overcook it. Hope this helps and if you ever want it a little thicker quickly stir in a cup or two of confectioners sugar right off the stove with the vanilla and will give it more of a Thicker consistency
     
  5. soesje

    soesje

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    what about making a classic ganache?  (for instance  8 oz choc with a cocoa percent over 50% minimum, to one cup heavy cream) pour it over the cake when the chocolate has melted and the mix cooled a bit in a thick sauce.

    should be thick enough to stay put. 

    it will set hard.

    if you want a fluffier chocolate frosting, you could whip this mix until cool and spread it like a butterfrosting, or pipe it, on the cake.
     
  6. stephaniee

    stephaniee

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    Thanks for the help!  I'm going to try these recipes today after I make two cakes for Thanksgiving.

    :D

    God Bless
     
  7. mickel corrodus

    mickel corrodus

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  8. gail egs

    gail egs

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    How much salt do I use?
     
  9. tr8gram

    tr8gram

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    Dear SouthernGal, thanks soooo much for sharing this recipe!  I am 64 years old and my "Grannie" who passed away 25 years ago at the age of 95.  By the time I got really old enough to want to learn to cook some of her recipes, she had gotten too old to cook.  So thanks for sharing this recipe.
     
  10. ccsummers

    ccsummers

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    This is probably a stupid question but here it goes... How long should I cook the sugar and chocolate etc? The recipe if the one I been looking for but that is the only problem I have with it. So I will greatly appreciate it if someone can answer this for me. Thanks
     
  11. h2035

    h2035

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    Thank you for providing a good, useable(home made)recipe.  It is perfect.  The combination of these ingredients, using the cream as the thinner, make the perfect frosting described as firm, but not brittle.  
     
  12. crystalwernicke

    crystalwernicke

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    There was a post on the first page saying that you'd need cocoa butter for the "crackle" experience. That actually leads me to believe that it was just actual chocolate, as cocoa powder contains no cocoa butter. Back then,  chocolate actually contained cocoa butter rather than now, which has palm oil or other alternatives, so please make sure to actually get couverture chocolate. I look forward to seeing everyones future experiences.
     
  13. cakeladyohio

    cakeladyohio

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    Stupid, yes margarine was invented in 1869 well over 100 years
     
  14. lovestocook1

    lovestocook1

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    I don't know who you are but this sounds exactly like my grandmothers cake. Layers were one inch thick, stayed moist but did not absorb the chocolate. She worked fast so it wouldn't harden before she finished. She would quickly top the cake with pecan halves. Sometimes she would make 14 layers. It was the best ever and always looked like it came from a bakery. She never wrote down the recipe. Now the grandchildren, great grandchildren and great-great grandchildren want to make it. I am going to use the recipe given in response to your question. As many people (including bakeries) as I have asked, no one can imagine 14 one inch layers with hard chocolate on the outside. Here goes!!!!!  
     
  15. diane f

    diane f

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    I am looking for the same frosting I think you are. for a 7 layer cake that the old ladies at  church and my grandma made. the frosting is thin and layers are thin. It cracks when you cut. But what I remember from my grandma was just Hersey choc. unsweet., water little saltand grandulated sugar. she would say it is in the timing. But it was so long ago and I want so bad to watch someone make it. She would have layers and layers of what she called a yellow daisy cake made. she would do several cakes at a time for holidays, always more than 6 layers, using old cast iron skillet. like others she did not measure or use recipe. But I am so aggravated now that I am going to try again this weekend to make my cake and if I succeed I will let you know. What I remember her doing was about 2 cups choc. and 2 cups sugar mix those two well first in skillet she would have a glass of water near by, oh and vanilla too. and salt.she heated the choc and sugar mix and salt she would start heating then slowly add water and bring to boil stirring madly , I beleive the key was when it got shiny she would allow a few more bubbles and then off heat pour vanilla and then stir stir stir. then pour on cakes , thin layers when it set it was always perfect.I don't know if that helps you, but I'm going to try it again this weekend. A friend showed me one sim. but she added sm. can evaap. milk and 3 tsp butter. but to me it was to thick, sweet and more like pudding. good luck.
     
  16. chef lenny

    chef lenny

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    I have this cook book and I think (I could be wrong) that a recipe similar to what you are looking for may be in here, I could check for you if you'd like. Did you find it or would you like me to look?

    The cook book I have:

     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2016
  17. hislander

    hislander

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    People in our area make a thin layer (usually 8) yellow cake iced with cooked fudge icing. It is inexpensive and very easy to fix.

    Ingredients:

    2 cups sugar

    9 tsp dry cocoa

    1 15 oz. can evaporated milk

    1 tsp vanilla

    1/2 stick butter

    In medium saucepan blend sugar and cocoa, making sure there are no lumps. Stir in milk. Over medium heat, cook for 7 minutes after the mixture begins to boil, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat. Stir in vanilla and butter. If mixture is too thin let cool for 5 minutes. Pour a small portion over each layer of cake. The icing hardens as it cools. Enjoy!
     
  18. valsue

    valsue

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    This is the exact reason that I came here to search! My mother has never forgotten the cake that her aunt would prepare in the country when she would prepare for company. My mother reports that my great aunt's cake was like nothing she has had since. From the replies that I am reading, I do not think that others understand either! It was a chocolate cake, and when it was cut to be served, the icing would literally CRACK. It sounds like it is heavenly! It is FAR from a thick creamy or even fudgy icing. I am still searching, too and prayerfully we will find that icing! This cake was prepared in the 1940's or 50's if that is of any help. Best Wishes to us as we search for this icing. I could begin to compare it to the thin icing that is poured over petis fours at the bakery...maybe helpful, and thank you to all who try to help!
     
  19. kelvin

    kelvin

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    Wow! sounds pretty tasty! :)
     
  20. kelvin

    kelvin

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    thanks diane :)