Looking for High Quality Canned Soup ...

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by schmoozer, Mar 2, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. schmoozer

    schmoozer

    Messages:
    279
    Likes Received:
    26
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    Hi, Finding some high quality canned or boxed soups, perhaps even organic, has become something of a priority. The usual soups, Campbell's, Progresso, and even some of the organics, tend to be overly salted, watery, and sometimes lacking in quality and quantity of solid ingredients. Around here a can of soup can be as much as $3.00 or more, and while soup can be had on sale, for that kind of money it would be nice to have better quality ingredients in the can.

    So, what do you recommend as a quality prepared soup? All types interest me - chowders, vegetable soups, meat soups, etc.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2010
  2. mikelm

    mikelm

    Messages:
    1,691
    Likes Received:
    37
    Exp:
    Home Chef
    Costco carries Boston-based Legal Seafoods' marvelous New England clam chowder, er... chowdah. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/bounce.gif     It's  $10 for two pint containers, and well worth it.

    For some reason though, they leave out Rosemary and Thyme, which are essentials in NE chowder. These are easily added when you reheat, though.

    Mike.
     
  3. cyberdoc

    cyberdoc

    Messages:
    163
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Chef
    $3.00 for a can of Campbell's???!!!  Where, pray tell, do you live?
     
  4. leeniek

    leeniek

    Messages:
    1,648
    Likes Received:
    49
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I've seen the ready to eat Campbell's soups run around $3 but the condensed ones are considerably cheaper than that.  If I buy soup I like to buy it frozen from Denninger's.  They make it fresh on site and then freeze it for sale. 
     
  5. thegardenguru

    thegardenguru

    Messages:
    95
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I am curious and at the risk of sounding judgemental or snobby or otherwise self-righteous, I need to ask: why would you ask for a source of canned soup from a forum membership that is composed of professional chefs and other cooks with an interest in cooking?

    I am truly confused.  This might be the best website available for anyone to get all degrees and variety of information on how to best make healthy inexpensive homemade soup.  And I suspect there are a gazillion other sites and interactive forums where such information can be had.  Why would you not come here and ask how to make soup at home for 1/10th the cost of canned soup?

    I feel like I'm not understanding something.

    Maybe the constructive reply is to offer to send Schmoozer my own collection of 200+ soup recipes.  Should I not assume that this "Cook at home" member is interested in cooking and not simply warming up a can of soup?

    Joe
     
  6. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

    Messages:
    2,119
    Likes Received:
    463
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    If they made good canned soups, most of use would be replaced by can openers. I spent two hours today making a Killer crawfish Gumbo...........now learn how to make a good stock, and you will be on your way to a better tasting life, a good soup, doesn't come out of a can............Chef Bill
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2010
  7. deltadude

    deltadude

    Messages:
    179
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    I'm with you gardenguru, why buy canned soup, rarely do you get the yummy comfort flavors you are craving.  My wife is the soup queen in our home.  Soup is something that is normally easy and when she gets home she doesn't like to toil in the kitchen for a few hours.  Two of my favorites she makes is lentil hamburger soup, lentils by themselves deliver a meaty flavor but had in some lean ground beef and every spoonful is hearty rich meaty flavor.  While she does good at chicken soup, I like her hamburger vegetable soup.  My wife isn't big on a lot of extra prep and uses only a few seasonings, but her soup broths have a clarity in flavor and taste that seem to impart the essence of what you are eating.  I'm big seasoning and adjusting cook and tend to overpower the natural flavors. 
     
  8. schmoozer

    schmoozer

    Messages:
    279
    Likes Received:
    26
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    Yeah, you're not understanding something.  I sometimes get very busy, sometimes I deal with a number of problems and issues that must be dealt with on short notice, and sometimes, at such times, I'd like something quick and easy to prepare, especially when my freezer and fridge are low on supplies.  What's wrong with canned soup.  I know that there are lots of people here that eat prepared foods - some even eat junk food.  So WTF is wrong with trying to find a few good quality prepared soups to make my life a little easier and more comfortable.

    As for recipes, well, I have more than 1,200 recipes on my computer, going back to when I first started cooking seriously in 1966.  If I want to make soup or stock I can certainly do so, and I do so frequently.

    And by the way, you do sound like a judgemental snob.  I'm willing to bet that, should I go through your pantry and kitchen, there'd be a fair amount of prepared and commercial foods to be found.    And this forum is composed of people who EAT all sorts of things as well as people who cook.  Do you prepare every meal from scratch?  Ever have a bowl of breakfast cereal?  Did you go out and harvest the grains, grind them, toast them, and milk the cow that provided the milk or cream?  So, put a sock in it and get off your high horse.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2010
  9. schmoozer

    schmoozer

    Messages:
    279
    Likes Received:
    26
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    Buzz off ... you don't know who I am and what I cook.  I make a lot of stocks and soups, teach cooking classes to seniors, and prepare several nice dinners for friends every month or so.  And, FWIW, soup not only gets made from scratch, but it comes out of a can and box as well. 
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2010
  10. schmoozer

    schmoozer

    Messages:
    279
    Likes Received:
    26
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    Hey there, DeltaDork - whatever I said in my previous messages is applicable to you as well.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2010
  11. fr33_mason

    fr33_mason

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
     Try the Knorr line of soups.  Some in the line are basic but well made and high quality as far as commercial soups are concerned.  A few igredients with some in the lineup make a wonderful, quick meal or snack.

    Here is a link to Knorr's site: www.knorr.ca
     
  12. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

    Messages:
    6,367
    Likes Received:
    129
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    Nothing against your basic argument, Schmooser, but I've a question about this line: "especially when my freezer and fridge are low on supplies."  Doesn't that apply to canned goods as well?

    I don't know how it is by you, but around here if I'm in a too busy to shop/cook mode, it isn't a one-night thing. So, if you haven't had a chance to shop for awhile you tend to go through the pantry items lickity split.

    More seriously, have you considered canning your own soups? That, to me, is the best of both worlds. Not only do you always have your favorites on hand, with just the ingredients you prefer, you can have built-in portion control based on the jar sizes you use.  

    Stocks can readily too, which frees up some of that tight freezer space.

    You do need a pressure canner for this, because few soups are acidic enough to process using other means. But the pressure canner is one of those tools that pays for itself fairly quickly.
     
  13. teamfat

    teamfat

    Messages:
    4,019
    Likes Received:
    434
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    I'll also mention the Knorr dry soup mixes.  Back when I was doing a lot of mountaineering stuff we almost always used Knorr for our soups when camping.  It has been quite some time since then, but I do recall them being the best tasting of those we tried.  I think oxtail was one of my favorites back then, and I think a leek mix.

    mjb.
     
  14. thegardenguru

    thegardenguru

    Messages:
    95
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Mr. Schmoozer:

    You have a serious chip on your shoulder, a bad attitude and a terribly uncivilized and immature internet manner.

    I asked, out of curiosity, why you would ask question such as yours on a site such as this.  I'm confident there are better forums. I asked in a civilized manner and I had hoped for an answer in an equally civilized manner.  I do not doubt your cooking ability so hence my questions rather than a condescending attitude.

    I deserve an apology but I won't ask for one, for me anyway.  But I'm hoping you're man enough to put up an apology for your nasty retorts to two others.  Where do you think you can communicate such as that?

    As for my pantry, believe it or not, I have no canned products and no packaged cereals.  But I admit to having some processed foods -- food products I cannot make because I have no mill for the wheat berries nor barrels for fermenting the soy sauce.

    Joe
     
  15. schmoozer

    schmoozer

    Messages:
    279
    Likes Received:
    26
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    If I'm low on fresh food and ingredients, it doesn't mean that I'd be low on canned items.  You see, I generally don't shop at supermarkets.  The local, organic farmers' market is my preference, so items like cans of soup can hang around for quite a while.  I usually shop for fresh ingredients several times a week, and don't inventory meat, fish, or produce for more than a couple of days.  But there are some days I don't feel like shopping, or can't shop, and it would be nice to just heat up a can or box of soup.  For me it's usually a one or, at most, two day thing.  Often I'll add ingredients to the soups I have been buying - using the soup as a base and then dumping in vegetables, meat, herbs, etc.  But every now and then I get in a bind, and just popping open a can of soup and not fussing would be very nice, unfortunately, most commercial soups are pretty bad, and that's why I asked for good quality possibilities.

    No, I've not thought much about canning my own soups, but I've certainly made plenty of soup and stock that has been frozen.
    However, not all soups freeze well, or as well as I'd like.  Having home made stock on hand means that I can whip up a soup by just tossing in some vegetables, meat, grains, beans, or whatever, but my life is such that I don't always have everything I want on hand, and I won't go into details here about my personal life to explain my circumstances.  All I want is a few suggestions for soups that others like and that I may not be familiar with to try.

    Honestly, I'm not too interested in canning, at least I haven't been in the past.  Nonetheless, even if I had a freezer filled with soup, etc., I'd still want a few cans of soup around.
     
  16. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

    Messages:
    2,119
    Likes Received:
    463
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Schmoozer, I think you stopped Schmoozing. The word "Schmoozing" is the art of working a room, I think you lost the art of Schmoozing. Every good Schmoozer knows when its working, and for you , its not. See you in the canned food isle.......TTFN...............Chef Bill
     
  17. gunnar

    gunnar

    Messages:
    1,447
    Likes Received:
    47
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    sounds like he is just stuck paying his 3 bucks a can
     
  18. charron

    charron

    Messages:
    231
    Likes Received:
    13
    Exp:
    Owner/Operator
    I know you said you'd rather have canned than frozen, but have you tried portioning out homemade soup in the serving bowls, lined with plastic film, and freezing?  If you wrap em, once frozen, in foil and gather like soups together in large ziplocks they keep very well.  Then it's just a matter of unwrapping, popping them back into the serving bowl and nuking for about 4 minutes on high.  It has worked for me for years and keeps me from pilfering the junkfood in my store when I'm too uh, disinclined to cook.

    If, like me, you find that food tastes better when prepared by someone else then perhaps you can find some fellow foodies and make a soup club.  Each of you prepare a large batch of soup and portion it in singles for freezing.  Swap 'em around... the more the merrier.


    Also, if I may ask, I would really appreciate it if you could tone down the bitter.  It's kinda spoiling the flavour of this lovely forum.  I realize you are my elder, since you have been 'cooking seriously' since before I was born, but even a young punk like me understands that reacting offensively to a divergent viewpoint is beyond rude.  Had I been present and heard you speak like that I would have Gibbs-slapped you without thinking twice.  And I would not have been sorry. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/tongue.gif

    Anywho, good luck in your quest. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif   I hope you find what you are looking for soon.
     
  19. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

    Messages:
    6,367
    Likes Received:
    129
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    I would have Gibbs-slapped you without thinking twice.

    Hmmmmm? And he's not even named Tony. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif
     
  20. francie12

    francie12

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    I know you already mentioned Progresso, but if you haven't tried Progresso lentil and Progresso "hearty tomato" I think they are 2 that do stand out and are worth trying and buying.        
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.