Looking for healthy cookbooks for home cook

Discussion in 'Cookbook Reviews' started by Qwertyuiop, Oct 31, 2018.

  1. Qwertyuiop

    Qwertyuiop

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    Pastry chef
    Hi,

    I'm moving out of my parents place in the spring and obviously I have to cook food myself lol. I know how to cook, just lack a bit on what I can make or inspiration

    I'm looking for cookbooks with healthy recipes. I don't mean vegan specific, vegetarian, or whatever-free type of cookbook

    Just general cookbook with healthy recipes that aren't loaded with butter, heavy cream/diary, fried food etc at pro chef level. It fine that it contain vegan or vegetarian recipes but no nuts related recipes because I don't like them except almond in tolerable amount.

    Thanks
     
  2. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    Sounds like you're also newish to cooking. One suggestion:

    Jacques Pepin's Simple and Healthy Cooking (1994)

    Good food, excellent technique. A great foundation for the future.
     
  3. Qwertyuiop

    Qwertyuiop

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    No I'm not newish to cooking... I'm a pastry chef but I don't cook alot but I know techniques and things like that

    Just need good modern dishes on what to make basically

    Will check out the book
     
  4. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    Well, serves me right for not checking your profile! Mouth open, foot inserted.

    Still, it's a good book.
     
    Qwertyuiop likes this.
  5. azenjoys

    azenjoys

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    I love all the Moosewood cookbooks for simple, wholesome, flavorful at-home cooking. The style is hippie meets world cuisine. The low-fat one is probably my favorite in terms of stuff I make over and over again, but I always add fat to all the recipes :rolleyes:.
     
  6. teamfat

    teamfat

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    Chinese and Indian cuisines tend to be heavy on veggies, light on dairy, fat and meat. I'll suggest you check out the classic "Indian Cooking" by Madhur Jaffrey.

    mjb.
     
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  7. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art, by Shizuo Tsuji.

    Now there's a cuisine low on fat and dairy!
     
  8. Ryan Fleischhacker

    Ryan Fleischhacker

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    Find a good German cook book.

    Southern Cooking and Most America cooking is heavily influenced by Traditional German Cooking.
     
  9. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    "Cooking Light" the magazine, puts out cookbooks and I have a couple. They are pretty decent and devote a lot of space to healthy, every day meals, and making comfort foods more healthy. You can also check books on Japanese, Thai and Vietnamese cuisine. These cuisines tend to, naturally, be more healthy diets. Indian cookbooks are another source of healthy recipes, but be careful and read the recipes thoroughly. Indian food may often be vegetarian, or vegetable heavy, but some of their foods, and recipes, are loaded with a lot of fat so be careful of which dishes you choose.
     
  10. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    If you want Japanese, I wrote a multi-review a while back. A bit dated now, but still I think useful.
     
  11. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    That strikes me as an odd recommendation and conclusion.

    IMHO most any cookbook will be healthy coooking for moderation choices in your menu. Portion control, moderating indulgences and focus ing on fresh seasonal ingredients as well as dried grains and legumes and you're there.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2018 at 5:12 AM
  12. Qwertyuiop

    Qwertyuiop

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    thanks guys... I will check out these suggestions
     
  13. butzy

    butzy

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    I know I wrote a reply to this question, but it seems to have gone awol.

    There are lots of interesting books, so it's difficult to give a recommendation.
    I do enjoy Madhur Jaffey books, esp "curry easy" and "curry easy vegetarian".
    Another one I would like to recomment is Raichens "bold and healthy flavors". His barbecue books also have a lot of interesting recipes
     
  14. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I wouldn't consider most barbecue to be "healthy."
     
  15. butzy

    butzy

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    Ah, but Pete,
    Those bbq books are not my recommendation for the healthy question, although I don't see why grilling/barbecueing would be unhealthy per se. But that's another discussion.
    I actually thought I had put that remark between brackets as it is just my personal opinion about his other books
    The recommended book is "bold and healthy flavours" which is not a bbq book
     
  16. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Got it. As for the other part-grilling can actually be a very healthy way to cook, but I not say that barbecue, in general, is really healthy. Look at most of the cuts that make great barbecue (slow and low cooking as opposed to much faster grilling) ribs, pork butt and shoulder, beef brisket. All of these cuts tend to be pretty fatty, which helps keep the meat moist during the long cooking process. Of course, there are always exceptions, but barbecuing is not the first thing I think of when thinking healthy cooking, although grilling does come immediately to mind.