Looking for a Italian pastry

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by patease, Nov 28, 2009.

  1. patease

    patease

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    Hi all, this is my first time on this forum. I've been searching for a recipe that my ex boyfriends mother used to make at christmas. It's an Italian pastry that are round deep fried balls filled with pastry cream, they are sweet and sticky and stacked on top of each other. It's absolutely amazing!!!! If anyone knows what this is and perhaps has a recipe I would be extremely grateful:p.
    Thanks in advance, Patty
     
  2. siduri

    siduri

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    This sounds like two possible things that I know, though there may be others.
    One is Zeppole di San Giuseppe (tzep'-po-leh dee sahn joo-zep'-peh) made on st joseph's day. They are basically choux dough (cream puff pastry) fried rather than baked, and filled with pastry cream. However these are not generally sticky, though i guess they sprinkle powdered sugar on top which might melt and become so. I like these if the pastry cream is good.

    The other is Cicerchiata (chee-cher-kyah'-tah) or Struffoli (stroof'-fo-lee) and probably have other names as well. This is a carnevale (mardi gras) sweet (to use up the grease in the house before lent). But they are not filled with cream. On the other hand they're sticky (they have some kind of sticky syrup that holds them all together (it's like a pile or ring of chick-pea shaped balls, made of rolled-out snakes of pasta frolla and cut into small pieces, fried and then rolled in the syrup, maybe made of honey, and stuck together). I think cicerchiata comes from ceci (chickpeas) though it could come from cerchio (circle) since they are often pressed into a ring shape. Usually little non-pareils are strewn on top and some pieces of candied orange peel. (I really don't see the point of them, they dont; taste like much).

    Oh, right, and another is sometimes filled with cream, also for carnevale, and are called Castagnole (cah stah NYO leh). These are (to my taste) pretty awful, just greasy balls about the size of a chestnut (castagna) from which their name, and are just balls of cakey dough that are fried, but not good like doughnuts, to my taste.
    Ok, so three things.
     
  3. patease

    patease

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    Thanks Siduri, I'm thinking it's probably the first recipe that you mentioned and perhaps she has altered it a bit. :thumb: I'm going to give it a go this Christmas, I'll let you know how it turns out.
    Thanks again, Patty;)
     
  4. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Croque-en-bouche by any other name would be as gooey. It's not particularly difficult to make, but it is tedious.

    BDL
     
  5. siduri

    siduri

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    but croque en bouche is not fried, right?
    zeppole are fried choux dough.
     
  6. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    You're right. Croque-en-bouche are baked and not fried. Health food, you might say.

    BDL
     
  7. patease

    patease

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    Thanks all, I think it's probably the zeppole and will be giving it a try this Christmas (fingers crossed) it turns out. I'll let you know how it goes.
    Thanks again, Patty:p