looking for a change , but need advice

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by pricey, Sep 28, 2015.

  1. pricey

    pricey

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    Ok Guys and possibly gals, I've been chefing for a short 6 years now , and for the majority of my time , been using European knives,ie wustof, mainly, however I'm looking for a new knife as a workhorse, around 210-240mm traditional Japanese made what ever that means , nothing like global , or shun as they seem to be overpriced and terrible , (my own oppinion , awaiting hate mail for disliking shun) I want a knife than can hold an edge and sharpens easily. I'm using stones to sharpen free hand , and a steel in work to touch up.

    Any and all advice is appreciated and as for my budget , well, I havnt really got one as long as it isn't ridiculously priced , looking to spend around £100-180. Additionally I love the domascus look on jap knives so keep that in mind.
    Have a nice day thank you for being patient and reading.
     
  2. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Are you open to carbon steel or stainless only?  How about stainless clad carbon (only the edge is reactive)?  Left handed right handed?  You're in the UK?
     
  3. pricey

    pricey

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    I'm open to all types of steel. As its all learning curve I won't shy away fr any types of steel. As I want my own oppinion , right handed , and yes in the UK so it will be a bit harder for me to import, but I have no problem doing so.
    Never heard of stainless clad carbon, what's the difference to other steels mentioned? It's only been the past year or so I've started to put intrest into all the properties of a knife so take it easy on me ;)
     
  4. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    The core steel is carbon, so it's easy to sharpen.  However the sides are covered in a stainless layer. Only the edge shows the core steel.  Think of it like sharpening a pencil, where the lead is the core steel.  It has the benefits of being easy to sharpen, but you don't have to worry as much about reactivity.  I treat all my knives the same though.  As soon as I'm done cutting, I wipe and dry.  It's a different way of working, but once you get it, you get it.

    I would recommend you this one http://www.cheftalk.com/t/86119/itinomonn-wa-kasumi-240 but I didn't pay VAT over here in the states, so it's not as good a deal. Atatax got the same one if you want to wait for his review.  Full Sack has the 270mm from the same.

    Other than JNS, look through http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/ to see if anything strikes your fancy.  $7 worldwide shipping direct from Japan.

    If you can't buy local you have the possibility of being hit by VAT and import duties.  Another option is to buy used.  kitchenknifeforums.com has an active trading forum and sometimes I kick myself when I see UK only sales.
     
    emilycooksretro likes this.
  5. pricey

    pricey

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    That is a beautiful knife indeed, I may wait for the review , as the wustof still does it's job, as for buying pre owned knives, I'm a little cautious , if rather buy new , as I love the intial New knife feel!

    Other than that knife youve recommended , what are you oppinions on Fujiwara and moronic knives as I've heard people reccomending them , but enough people objecting to make me think twice, after all , I believe knives are personall, however I don't want to spend the money then not have a feel for the knife!
     
    millionsknives likes this.
  6. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    You won't find too much hate mail on this forum regarding your disinterest in Shun knives.  But even the late, great Saint BDL would say that your comment about them being "terrible" is inaccurate. They may not be your cup o'tea, and they may not meet your needs... but calling them "terrible" is just ignorant.

    Thus ends the only "hate mail" you might receive. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/talker.gif  

    Good luck finding the knife of your dreams!
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2015
  7. pricey

    pricey

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    Fair comment , I won't argue it does come accross ignorant, I have used them in the past , my head chef uses them and swears by them and personally just nothing special to me, so as I leave familiar waters of knives from Europe I'm now taking the plunge! Who knows , this purchase may end up being a shun. Only time will tell!
     
  8. pricey

    pricey

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    Ok then , I've seen a knife I like the look of, it's expensive , but a knife is like your baby after all , so I intend on looking after it and keeping it for well for ever just because of how beautiful the knife looks, the review the website gives is a good one, but that could just be to sell it , so ill let you guys who know every thing there is or most about knives , so experts , here's the link:
    http://www.chefsarmoury.com/kitchen...maboroshi-no-meito-210mm-gyuto/prod_1554.html

    Hit me!
     
  9. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    The Maboroshi line in particular has good reviews in terms of cutting performance. It tapers a lot so the spine at the heel is thicker and at the tip it is very thin.  Be aware so you use the tip for things that require thinness. The profile looks very flat if you like that sort of thing.  White steel is the easiest to sharpen which is good if you're doing the sharpening yourself.  If this is what you're intent on, it is cheaper to buy direct from the maker

    http://www.teruyasu.net/products/detail_4.html
     
  10. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    The pricing is so weird from this maker.  23000 yen for 210mm then 43000 yen for 240mm.  Almost 2x increase for 3 cm! 
     
  11. pricey

    pricey

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    Well you have got a point there, looking at it it's a interesting knife I won't say I'm getting it as why rush there's a lot of options out there. This is one of many, however I have heard of fujiwara being one of the finer makers from Japan , but having never used there knives , I can't comment
     
  12. pricey

    pricey

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    I'm hearing today about these "laser knives" more specifically Richmond Laser AS Gyuto 210mm Maple I have seen on the cktg website , wüst makes These Type of knives so reliable , I am a little worried that the blades may shatter being so thin or being prone to chip on stones during the sharpening process? Still another knife I'm considering , I hear a lot of compliments on Richmond's so having never used them myself , some information on the group would be appreciated.
     
  13. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Richmond Laser is thin behind the edge, but the rest of it going up to the spine isn't thin enough that I would call it a laser.   It's not even a great deal anymore (they used to be cheaper) considering other options in the price range.   Any knife that is very thin behind the edge is going to be more prone to chipping.  A price you pay for the performance.  Being very thin, it will slide through vegetables easy.  On the other hand, if you cut something like thinly sliced potato, it can stick on you. 

    To maximize edge retention and minimize chipping:

    - End grain wood board (you won't use one in pro kitchen) or rubber like Hi-Soft brand etc.  Stay away from glass, bamboo (which is mostly hard glue)

    - Don't cut chicken bones with it, use your wusthof for that

    - Tip down pivoting/ rock chopping can chip it.  Push cut or slice/pull cut

    - Put on a microbevel

    For lasers consider this one which IMO is the best deal on 'laser' knives right now http://www.cheftalk.com/t/87228/need-some-convincing#post_517444
     
  14. pricey

    pricey

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    Yeah I'm not too sure about lasers, I'm using plastic boards in work , and using a stone (fine) at beggining and the end of shift, so I keep my edges well, the knife atm I've fell in love with is a fujiwara 210mm Gyuto

    http://www.chefknivestogo.com/funa21gyocha.html
     
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  15. pricey

    pricey

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    But as I said I don't want a laser knife as I feel cautious about how likely they are to chipping, especially with all the hard veg I can be cutting , this fujiwara has nice reviews and looks beautiful, not overly expensive and is made with a white steel core? Which is meant to maintain a edge and be somewhat easy to maintain? Correct me if I'm wrong , I'm still learning all the little details so many of us chefs choose to turn a blind eye too!
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2015
  16. benuser

    benuser

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    Have a blade with some convexity on the right face, thin behind the edge and put a conservative edge on it.
    Never seen an edge chipping on stones -- during sharpening.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2015
  17. ordo

    ordo

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    If you like the pear skin (nashiji) finishing, you may also consider this Tanaka Ginsanko (Stainless Steel core) 240mm. for U$170.


    http://www.chefknivestogo.com/tagigy24.html

    It may  not be in the same league as the Fujiwara in terms of hardness and handle quality, but gets the job done.

    As you see, i recommend you to buy the 240mm. I own  the same Tanaka knife in 210mm. -i love it- but always regret not buying the 240mm.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2015
  18. pricey

    pricey

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    Interesting choice, pros and cons in your own oppinion , I havnt seen or used that brand before , so I will take it into consideration.
     
  19. ordo

    ordo

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    pros:
    • almost half the price of a similar 240mm. Fujiwara which lists for U$315.
    • stainless steel core. No maintenance problems.
    • similar exterior finishing.
    cons:
    • the core is not carbon steel. Not a paradox, but many people will prefer carbon steel.
    • hardness 62 HRC instead of 64 HRC, could mean better edge retention (and also chipping issues if misused).
    • Fujiwara being thicker may have a better grind in terms of food release.
    • handle quality. The Tanaka handle is pretty basic D shape.
    Considering all this, me personally would not pay U$145 more for the Fujiwara, but remember i only have first hand experience with the Tanaka, which, by the way, is a very well known brand.

    In any case, please go for the 240mm.
     
  20. pricey

    pricey

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    Noted , and will think about it, the money I'm spending , it isn't a huge deal as my knives normally will last me for years as I look after them and sharpen them briefly on stones every other day with stropping after work and before.
    Thank you for your post and will take that knife into consideration