Looking for 300mm Chef's knife

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by atatax, Feb 5, 2015.

  1. atatax

    atatax

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    So right now my Chef's knife is a 8" Wusthof grand prix ii and i want to replace with with a better, larger, Chef's knife. I prefer european styled handles and my hand is rather large, laying my hand on a tape measure, the palm width is about 4 3/4 in. My budget while not set in stone is about $300-$350(usd and i am in the USA). I feel like much higher then that and i would probably be too afraid to use it :p

    So Knives i'm currently looking at are:

    Masamoto VG Gyuto 300mm

    Mac Ult 12 1/2  Chef's knife

    Mac Pro 10 3/4 Chef's knife

    Fujiwara Teruyasu 300mm Gyuto Maboroshi

    So the Mac Ult and Fujiwara Teruyasu where i'm seeing them are a little over budget, but maybe there are deals somewhere for them or if there is a reputable used knife retailer. Maybe I'm just dreaming a little with the Fujiwara Teruyasu as it is a bit over budget. The Mac Pro is a little shorter then i would prefer and i don't see a longer pro series chef knife. The Masamoto VG is right in the budget and length but i have read its a bit flexible and can be punishing if your technique isn't the best, so probably not the best first large chef knife. Any advice?
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2015
  2. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    I have the Mac Pro 10 3/4 Chef's knife and love it. Have had it for 2 years now and use it for 97% (or better) of my work. I don't have a tape measure handy (on vacation) but it sounds like my hands are close to yours in size.
     
  3. mike9

    mike9

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    Last edited: Feb 5, 2015
  4. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    270mm is a good size.  300mm is unwieldy. 

    If you're getting something this big, it is for massive amounts of prep right? I would say get the lightest thinnest 270mm you can get.  The weight and the time you spend working don't just add, they multiply.  Konosuke, gesshin ginga, or other laser 270mm.
     
  5. mike9

    mike9

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    I did a couple of 12" American carbon conversions a few years ago and while being quite nimble with wa handles they were just too much knife to be practical for home use.  I moved down to 270mm and used those for quite a while.  Now a 240mm, or 10" is my go to knife for prep work.  For smaller tasks I use a 150mm petty, or a 210mm line knife, or a cleaver, or any other "special purpose" blades I have on hand.

    300mm is generally for Yanagiba and Sujihiki.  

    I would buy this and rehandle it - I have one that I did and it's not for sale.  Amazing profile, great steel, great American maker.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Fine-Vintag...789?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item540ae11fe5

    Here's mine - I made the handle from flame maple and blue dyed maple burl.


     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2015
  6. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Yeah, but OP is a professional and probably does more prep work in a day than you do all week.  270mm is a reasonable size for that.  300mm is unnecessary because you should have a long slicer for slicing tasks.
     
  7. atatax

    atatax

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    yeah, i have a Suji. So sounds like the consensus is that the Mac Pro should be more then long enough.
     
  8. mike9

    mike9

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    Yes, but the difference between 270mm and 10" is 1/2" and that Goodell will cut rings around a lot of "modern" knives.  Hey - I'm a carbon junky what can I say?  Carbon Devin, carbon Rader, carbon Marko, carbon Carters, etc., etc., etc.
     
  9. benuser

    benuser

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    Try a 300mm Fujiwara FKH, $100 with JCK. I've been using a 290mm vintage Trompette Sabatier (1890's) for some time and liked it a lot -- once I got used to it, and that took a few hours. Just see if it fits.
     
  10. duckfat

    duckfat

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    I'd be paying as much attention to profile and intended use as length. 300mm for me is minimal on a yanagi but a beast on a Gyuto.  270mm for a Gyuto is going to be the norm in a working knife. Larger hands do not mean you need a larger knife. Sarah Moulton is about 5' nothing and probably weighs 100# on a bad day. She wields a 12" knife with ease. Gotta roll with what ever works best for you.

    For 300mm I'd also look at the Yoshihiro (carbon) on Amazon ($160) or the Tojiro DP ($120) on eBay. This way if you find 300mm too much for all tasks you can still add the 9.5" Mac Pro for less than the cost of the Masamoto alone.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2015
  11. atatax

    atatax

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  12. atatax

    atatax

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    If i was to get a carbon knife, is there really an advantage to getting a vintage sabatier or goodell over a modern carbon knife like the Yoshihiro on amazon for $160?
     
  13. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    It'd be soft carbon so you can use a honing steel, but overall edge retention is not as good.
     
  14. benuser

    benuser

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    Expect a lot of work to be done on most vintages. Protruding heel, reverse belly, tip correction, thinning are the most common. You can hardly see it from pictures. Prices have risen a lot the last years. Have you considered a new Sab instead?
     
  15. atatax

    atatax

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    Ended up just going with the mac pro 270mm; saw it new on ebay for $210
     
  16. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    I have used a few chef's knives in 40 years and this my favorite so far.
     
  17. atatax

    atatax

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    for maintenance, i assume a quick daily hone and then maybe a weekly sharpening with water stones?

    also, not crazy about the logo on the knife, looks like imitation american imo. But i guess if it performs well i can live with the logo.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2015
  18. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    No hone, just once a week on stones. In general, this seems to be what I routinely do for maintenance purposes during normal weeks.
     
  19. benuser

    benuser

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    Traditional honing with a rod will indeed rather weaken an edge. You may -- depending on your requirements -- strop on your finest stone between full sharpening sessions. I guess that will be one edge trailing stroke one the right side, one on the left one, and finally one on the the right side, all very light. With an asymmetric edge in a pro environment that will be at some 15 degrees at right, and 22 at the left side. When it doesn't work to get the edge smooth do the same with the previous -- penultimate -- stone.
     
  20. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Our vanished knife guru BDL recommended the Mac Pro over the Masamoto VG and best choice as far as mid-priced stainless gyutos go.

    Whether you need to do touch up during the week or not will depend on how acute and angle you sharpen to.  I'd guess that if you are below 36deg inclusive then probably yes, in which case an Idahone can be used if you think Stropping on stones inconvenient.   It will remove a small amount of metal as well as realign the edge, use it gently both for the sake of the Idahone and your new Japanese knife.  I use a fine Arkansas stone with one edge rounded a bit, pressure is nothing more than the weight of the knife.

    Rick