Long Term or Short Term, Which Is Better?

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Joined Sep 22, 2002
I am in the process of deciding whether or not I want to enter one of the many culinary schools here in 2003. Cook's Street, Cooking School of the Rockies, and the Culinary Institute of America (and later on, Johnson & Wales University) are among some of the schools I have considered. My question about schools lies in the fact that I noticed that the school called Cook's Street offers a 3-month term, whereas the others give the usual full-year term. I am having a difficult time deciding between long-term and short-term. Would a short-term be worth it or would I be able to learn the Culinary Arts more fully by the full-year term? I am interested in hearing what you all think. Thanks in advance!
 
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Joined Sep 26, 2002
Well are they ACF accredited or not? Does that give you a degree or certificate? I would be careful. What is it you want to do career wise(goal). There are a lot of ways to judge it. Also listen to your gut instinct. Do they have a website
 
3,853
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Joined May 26, 2001
Look at their curricula. How much material do they expect to cover? How much practical time, how much classroom? Is the course at an appropriate for YOU -- what you already know, what you need to learn?

If you can actually check them out on-site: which has a teaching style that makes you the most comfortable?

And, as RickH pointed out: what is your goal? Which school seems like it will move you the closest to that goal?

Go back through the archives of this forum. There have been many discussions of "How do I pick a school?" that might be helpful to you. :)
 
51
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Joined Sep 22, 2002
To be honest, I don't know if they are ACF accredited or not. None of the schools mentioned that association. I do know, however, that "Cooking School of the Rockies" does not qualify for financial aid yet, as they are still a somewhat new school. If you want to look at the websites, here are the links:
Cooking School of the Rockies
Cook's Street
My goal for wanting to go to school is to become a real certified, professional chef. I want to be the chef I have dreamed of being for so long. I want to take my simple homecooking skills and turn them into a real passion for the culinary arts. If I remember correctly, Cook's Street offers an online program, but I would much rather go into a classroom with other culinary students so that I may learn better that way, being able to watch the chef instructors unfold their culinary passion right before my eyes, so that I may catch the same enthusiasm and passion for the food that they display. I thought about homeschooling, but then I thought that maybe I would be better off learning in a real school.

Thanks for the suggestions about the archives; I'll check them out!
 
131
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Joined Aug 9, 2000
Actually Cook Street is worth 30 ACF continued-ed points.They are both part of the IACP.
 
131
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Joined Aug 9, 2000
Also Lumpia almost any decent school is good to get your foot in the door have you worked in a restaurant to see if you like it? That is highly recomended before you spend a bunch of money on school. Another point is do not be dazzled by big schools and their sales pitch big school or small they all teach you the basics what you do with it is up to you. You either have the talent for it or you don't. School names will beneifit you in the first couple of years but if you show talent and drive then it wont matter where you go.
 
51
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Joined Sep 22, 2002
Really? How did you find that out? I haven't had a chance to visit the schools yet; the only information I have about them are the brochures they sent me in my request for more information and the websites they have.

By the way, yes, I have worked in a real restaurant. Prior to that, I had a bit of experience in fast-food, but I wanted a change to the real side of the culinary world. From my experiences in these restaurants, I have developed a very faint picture in my mind of what the real culinary world must be like.
 
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Joined Aug 9, 2000
It is on the website I checked it out before and actually I mad a mistake it is only 20 points but they host the ACF chapter too.
 
427
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Joined Jan 21, 2002
As far as ACF accredidation (sp?) goes: there are some community colleges that have that (the one here does and Art Institute doesn't). Long term or short is a personal question only you can answer. But once you do there lies a new can of worms that's been opened. I have never heard of a 3-month degree awarding program. Maybe it's a class for hobbyists. If the CIA isn't ACF approved I'd laugh my a** off. But it is so I can't.
 
51
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Joined Sep 22, 2002
Thank you for all your responses! Now that I have asked my question, I am beginning to feel more confident as to what school I want to attend. I am eagerly looking forward to it!
 

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