London Broil? Need advice as soon as possible

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by onepiece, Mar 30, 2012.

  1. onepiece

    onepiece

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    I haven't been on here in quite a while due to moving and other reasons, but I am finally getting settled in and wanted to come back here.  So I have a London Broil (I understand that is actually a way to cook the meat, and not the actual name) and it will be cooked later this evening.  It has been marinated since yesterday, but then I realized I don't have a broiler pan.  

    Basically what I have is a skillet, large glass dish for the oven, and tin foil.  What would be the best way to cook this with the items I have?
     
  2. onepiece

    onepiece

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    I have another idea on how I could do this.

    If I place the glass baking dish on the metal rack under the rack above it, it should cook decently.

    Turn the oven on to broil and place the Meat directly on the metal rack directly so the fat and juices 

    drip down to the baking dish so the fluids don't steam the meat.  Opinions?  
     
  3. ordo

    ordo

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    If yo do that, put some water in the glass or you could smoke the meat with the juices falling down and burning.
     
  4. onepiece

    onepiece

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    Good point.  Thanks for the response.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
  5. eastshores

    eastshores

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    My only contribution is make sure to let it rest 10+ minutes before slicing, and I bought a rotary slicer for exactly that cut of meat. I love it shaved.. so full of flavor and yet thin enough that the toughness is not an issue!
     
  6. chefedb

    chefedb

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    A true 'London Broil is a cut called a flank. The stuff they are pawning off in the supermarkets is from the chuck. A flank can't be cut on a slicer or as you call it a rotary blade. It is cut thin by hand on a bias so it is tender. if you cut it straight across, it is unchewable. It is best broiled and finished a feww minutes in oven. Since I do not know what cut of beef you have , I can't advise you except to say it is best you marinated it whatever it is.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2012
  7. onepiece

    onepiece

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    Well the cut the local Weis pawned off to me was cooked tonight.  

    Overall it was pretty decent.  It wasn't tough by any standard, and flavor was okay (I need to work out the marinade recipe).  

    Cooking directly on the oven rack with a dish under it worked better than I expected as well.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif
     
  8. thatchairlady

    thatchairlady

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    Have never been very pleased with steaks broiled indoors... just me, maybe.  SIL does something interesting with London Broil on the grill.She slices it ahead of time (raw) and then marinates.  Once grill is screaming hot, everybody scrambles to get everything else on the table.  She lays out the slices on grill.  By the time they're all on, she flips.  Once all flipped they come right off and onto s warm platter.  Has always been tasty and tender.  Sorta a fajita style cooking??
     
  9. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Still do not know what cut of beef everyone is using.
     
  10. duckfat

    duckfat

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    London broil is a dish not a particular cut of meat even though some stores label meat as such. Flank steak is the most common in the US for London broil but top round or other cuts like skirt will work as well.  A quick marinade and then the meat gets cooked directly under a hot broiler.

    When I grill the same steak it's closer to fajita meat than London Broil (IMO) but that's just splitting hairs on semantics or perhaps seasoning.

    I allow the meat to rest and cut on the bias. I never cut a London broil vertically like a regular steak. Instead of talking about angles I'd suggest using a pair of kitchen tongs as a guide by laying the side of your knife on the tongs, holding at an angle and then slicing very thin. This is not the best video to show this technique but I think it may help show what I'm talking about.

    Just FF to 2:12

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B1WU0QIvrs0

    Dave
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2012
  11. french fries

    french fries

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    Here in L.A. (Southern California) it's always bottom round. I've never seen a flank steak or a chuck steak labeled as "London Broil" around here! 
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2012
  12. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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  13. chefedb

    chefedb

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    If you check the USDA Meat Manuals  True/ original London Broil is cut from the Flank. There is only 1 from a steer.  They can cut 6 to 10 from a top round or a squared off chuck or even if desperate a bottom round;  Today some places even use Tri Tips.
     
  14. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Bottom round is one of the toughest cuts  and is meant for baising Ie pot roast, sauer  braten, swiss steak . To try and pass this off as London Broil is a hoax that the meat industry has pulled off over the years. I don't care Southen California or New York.
     
  15. duckfat

    duckfat

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    It really is amazing some times how regional differences can vary.  It's easy to over look on the site Pete linked as the print is smaller but the Meat Man also says;

    "The recipe (London Broil) first appeared in print in the US the early 1930's, and consisted of marinated Flank Steak".

    When in doubt I consult IMPS/NAMP meat buyers guide. I see no specific number designation for London broil but I haven't finished my coffee yet! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif

    I do agree with Chefedb. I'd find some place new to shop if I saw bottom round getting passed off as London Broil. While non-specific names like "london Broil" give retailers a wide berth in marketing that is well out side the norm on a national level.

    Dave
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2012
  16. onepiece

    onepiece

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    The label on the meat states it is "round" doesn't state whether it is top or bottom round.  
     
  17. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    Resurrecting this thread.

    Here in the Midwest, "London Broil" is a cut of top round and I have two. I was veg for a long time, so I am just learning to cook meats and I don't know how to cook them.

    They are not the big, 2" thick slabs of meat one would expect from the supermarket flyer picture. They are a little over an inch thick at best. (The other market that had them on sale this week had rather thin slices of top round which I shied away from, thinking there was no way to slice that kind of a cut on the bias to minimize toughness.) 

    I do plan on marinating them and would be open to hearing peoples' favorite marinades for this cut of meat.

    Once that is done, what is the best way to cook them?

    I am a city dweller and do not have access to a grill.

    Thanks for any suggestions.
     
  18. jimbo68

    jimbo68

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    Flank can be easily distinguished from round as the grain will run along the whole piece end to end.  When I worked in a packing house 50 years ago and someone ordered London broil, they got a trimmed flank steak.  Today I see more round or chuck passed off as LB than flank.  A lot of meats have been creatively named over the years.  The best bet is to become familiar enough with the critter and cuts to know what you are buying by looking at it.

    I generally marinade in a mixture of Worstershire, garlic, and pepper, but that is a personal preference.  I have also used Dales, which is a soy based marinade.
     
  19. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    I usually get a 6 - 7 # piece of bottom round (more fat than the top round) and slice off a two inch thick piece.  That's my L.B..  And the remainder is sliced very thinly and seasoned to make beef jerky.
     
  20. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Marinate it  to break down the fiborous cells of the meat otherwise it will be like shoeleather.  Yop round usually has more marbeling fat then a bottom round.     I have never used these two cuts for London Broil  Tops for roast top siroin  bottoms for pot roast, sauerbratin etc.

    Bottom round is also sols as cube steak ,swiss steaks when pounded ,, mom and pop steak, Brassole meat, chicken fried steak when pounded.

    The supermarkets also try to pawn off chuck as london broil No Way.  Unless the consumer knows meat cuts they are screwed daily.